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Poets Inspired by Technology? 52

Posted by Cliff
from the geeks-and-literature dept.
dejetal asks: "Does anyone know of a poet who's typical topic is some form of technology? I have been personally interested in this subject for some time now (with disappointing search results), but now I have some new motivation: I will be attending Columbia University fairly soon, and I would like to have an interesting topic to work on for a writing/composition course. Columbia also has some exciting new majors that may appeal to the Slashdot crowd, one of them being Digital Media Technology , the area of study that I wish to enter. Can anybody point me towards some good techno-poets?"
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Poets Inspired by Technology?

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  • Haiku (Score:2, Funny)

    by cyberkreiger (463962)
    First post on slashdot
    Everybody see me rule
    Even on-topic
  • me and my girlie like to AOL Instant Message TM peoms back and forward to see who can write stupid limmrick type things faster, sometimes we get going fast enough that we'd basically be writing them in real time, which in someways is akin to freestyle rap, which is interesting.

    anyway, here are a few of the dumber ones, for some reason a lot of them have animals doing stuff as their themes...

    There was a snake named Luan
    That jumped in a pool not a pond
    She said with a lisp, "oh I can't drink thissss!"
    and laughed as she slithered along
    The end

    There twice was a frog named Samantha
    Who married a strong young grey Panther
    He said to her nightly, "I would hold you tightly"
    But my paws would quell your sweet banter
    The end

    Three boats in a dock near the harbor
    All waiting to go travel farther
    The first captain said, "You two, go ahead"
    But the two, being led
    by courtesey said,
    "Grab hold of wind and we'll follow!"
    The end

    Now that I read them again, they're not really perfect limmricks, but oh well...
  • perl poets (Score:4, Interesting)

    by neillewis (137544) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @08:02AM (#5492663)
    There is a thriving perl poetry [perlmonks.org] community.
  • Mostly anti-tech (Score:5, Informative)

    by RobotWisdom (25776) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @08:02AM (#5492665) Homepage
    I can't really imagine a serious poem about tech unless it's anti-tech. For light verse, John Updike no doubt has some things, and there's Nabokov's "The Refrigerator Awakes" [RealAudio] [psu.edu]. (In the realm of song lyrics, They Might Be Giants is another likely source.)

    Paul Durcan's "Christmas Day" (not online) has a comment that could be Slashdot's motto:

    Why do computer programmers always answer

    When asked in questionnaires
    In Sunday newspapers
    What is your idea of Heaven? -
    Snorkelling in Acapulco.

    Pope Leo XIII wrote a Latin piece on photography in 1867: [translation] [gavinbryars.com]

    O miracle of human thought,

    O art with newest marvels fraught...

    Some gleanings from my weblog: landing-gear crisis [poems.com], Chuck-E-Cheese [poems.com], auto repair [poems.com]

    • by rodentia (102779)
      I beg to differ. Anti-tech is too strong. Much of modern poetry may regard the machine with ambivalence, but to the extent it features in a poem it partakes of the struggle for relevance with every other external.

      There are numberous odes to the bridge of Brooklyn: Mayakovsky and Lorca come to mind.
  • Linux Haikus (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Linux Haikus [linuxhaiku.com]. Share thoughts and humor on linux using the ancient Japanese form of poetry known as haiku
    • Uh, call me batty, but I can't find one scrap of haiku anywhere at Linuxhaiku.com. I see a blog, and a slashbox. I did find an empty topic catagory called haiku....
  • Some Haikus (Score:1, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward
    No keyboard present, Hit F1 to continue Zen engineering?

    The Tao that is seen; Is not the true Tao, until You bring fresh toner.

    Three things are certain: Death, taxes, and lost data. Guess which has occurred.

    Windows NT crashed. I am the Blue Screen of Death. No one hears your screams.

    Seeing my great fault Through darkening blue windows I begin again.

    The code was willing, It considered your request, But the chips were weak.

    Printer not ready. Could be a fatal error. Have a pen handy?

    A file that big? It might be very useful. But now it is gone.

    Errors have occurred. We won't tell you where or why. Lazy programmers.

    Server's poor response Not quick enough for browser. Timed out, plum blossom.

    Chaos reigns within. Reflect, repent, and reboot. Order shall return.

    Login incorrect. Only perfect spellers may enter this system.

    This site has been moved. We'd tell you where, but then we'd have to delete you.

    Wind catches lily scatt'ring petals to the wind: segmentation fault

    ABORTED effort: Close all that you have. You ask way too much.

    First snow, then silence. This thousand dollar screen dies so beautifully.

    With searching comes loss and the presence of absence: "My Novel" not found.

    The Web site you seek cannot be located but endless others exist

    Stay the patient course Of little worth is your ire The network is down

    A crash reduces your expensive computer to a simple stone.

    There is a chasm of carbon and silicon
    the software can't bridge

    Yesterday it worked Today it is not working Windows is like that.

    To have no errors Would be life without meaning No struggle, no joy

    You step in the stream, but the water has moved on. This page is not here.

    Hal, open the file Hal, open the damn file, Hal open the, please Hal

    Out of memory. We wish to hold the whole sky, But we never will.

    Having been erased, The document you're seeking Must now be retyped.

    The ten thousand things How long do any persist? Netscape, too, has gone.

    Rather than a beep Or a rude error message, These words: "File not found."

    Serious error. All shortcuts have disappeared Screen. Mind. Both are blank.
  • Luis de Camoes (Score:5, Informative)

    by SAN1701 (537455) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @08:44AM (#5492796)
    Considered the great portuguese poet ever, his most important work, "Os Lusiadas", is a story about the Portuguese explorations of the seas since 1400, and their achivements (like, discovering the route to India, "discovering" Madagascar, etc.). Since they were dealing with the highest technology of their time, I think it qualifies as an important poem inspired by technology.

    "Os Lusiadas" is mandatory reading in many high schools in Brazil and Portugal. Some links:

    http://web.rccn.net/Camoes/ [rccn.net]
    http://lusiadas.gertrudes.com/ [gertrudes.com]
  • Share & Enjoy ! (Score:2, Informative)

    by espee (64799)
    "Share and Enjoy" is, of course, the company motto of the hugely successful Sirius Cybernetics Corporation Complaints division.

    At times of special celebration a choir of over two million robots sing the company song "Share and Enjoy". Unfortunately another of the computing errors for which the company is justly famous means that the robot's voices are exactly a flattened fifth out of tune...

    Share and Enjoy
    Share and Enjoy
    Journey through life
    With a plastic boy
    Or girl by your side
    Let your pal be your guide
    And when it breaks down
    Or starts to annoy
    Or grinds when it moves
    And gives you no joy
    Cos it's eaten your hat
    Or had sex with your cat
    Bled oil on the floor
    or ripped off your door
    You get to the point
    You can't stand it anymore
    Bring it to us
    We won't give a fig
    We'll tell you...
    Go Stick Your Head In A Pig
  • Violets are blue...
    If I keep going..
    I'll get mod'ed down too..
  • by metamatic (202216) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @09:42AM (#5493074) Homepage Journal
    I'm assuming you mean published "name brand" poets, rather than Anonymous Cowards... I suspect I'm gonna be the only person posting anything useful here, but it just so happens that you've touched on a favorite obsession of mine: why aren't there more poets dealing with actual modern life?

    Anyway, a few pointers:

    You'll probably have trouble finding them, but Lawrence Lerner wrote two books of computer-inspired poems. The first was "A.R.T.H.U.R.: The Life and Opinions of a Digital Computer". UMass Press, ISBN 0-87023-181-2.

    ARTHUR is a dim-witted AI (the poems were written in the early 70s). The poems are humorous, but at the same time some of them are quite chilling. I forget the title of his second ARTHUR book; I never managed to track down a copy.

    The other obvious answer is "The Policeman's Beard Is Half Constructed" by RACTER, aka William Chamberlain and Thomas Etter. RACTER was the psychotic cousin of ELIZA, and Chamberlain and Etter used it to create programs which would output demented prose and poetry.

    Something I've often pondered is the feasibility of building a reverse-engineered INRAC clone under the GPL, so RACTER could live again. (Apparently the original authors lost the BASIC source code some years ago.)

    If you include song lyrics as poetry, you have to check out recent albums by Momus [demon.co.uk]. He's the only songwriter I'm aware of dealing with technological subjects in an intelligent and witty fashion. "Virtual Valerie" (from "The Philosophy of Momus") is the best song I've ever heard about long-distance relationships via Internet, and "Finnegan The Folk Hero" is a hilarious pastiche of country music that'll strike a nerve with any web developer.
  • by eddy the lip (20794) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @10:17AM (#5493305)

    The first that springs to mind is Ray Bradbury. He's published at least two volumes of poetry with wide ranging subject matter (rather like his fiction, for that mattter). It's not necessarily to everyone's taste in the same sense that his short stories may not be; that is, he's obviously having fun and they're extremely un-pretentious. I enjoyed them.

    While I was googling for another name (which I unfortunately couldn't find), I discovered that both Ursula K. LeGuin and Thomas Disch have published poetry. Not sure how technology oriented any of it is. I think I'll be looking for some of it though, especially Disch.

    Finally, you may want to check out the Rhysling Awards [dm.net] (also a collection [sfsite.com]) and Star*Line [dm.net], the newsletter of the Science Fiction Poetry Association.

  • Technology as a typical subject perhaps not, but the immortal William McGonagall did touch on that topic, as he did on many others[*].
    1. The Railway Bridge of the Silvery Tay [mcgonagall-online.org.uk]
    2. The Tay Bridge Disaster [mcgonagall-online.org.uk]
    3. An Address to the New Tay Bridge [mcgonagall-online.org.uk]
    Enjoy.

    [*]Poetry, alas, not being one of them.

    • oh yes, good old william mcgonagall, he's quite possibly the greatest poet ever, well, ok, that'sa teeny weeny lie. HE got a mention in the book "worst writers" or something, part of a series of books called the mind's eye or something. But seriously, he s really awful, hilariously awful
  • From Locksley Hall (Score:3, Interesting)

    by hey! (33014) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @11:08AM (#5493719) Homepage Journal
    Here is a snippet from Tennyson's Locksley Hall:


    For I dipt into the future, far as human eye could see,
    Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be;

    Saw the heavens fill with commerce, argosies of magic sails,
    Pilots of the purple twilight dropping down with costly bales;

    Heard the heavens fill with shouting, and there rain'd a ghastly dew
    From the nations' airy navies grappling in the central blue;

    Far along the world-wide whisper of the south-wind rushing warm,
    With the standards of the peoples plunging thro' the thunder-storm;

    Till the war-drum throbb'd no longer, and the battle-flags were furl'd
    In the Parliament of man, the Federation of the world.



    A better question than what poets are inspired by technology, is what makes inspiring poetry, and how does technology fit into that? Art at its best makes you look at the world differently, and, in some rare cases, as above, rises to prescience. Poetry, if it is of lasting value, addresses conditions that are themselves lasting. In this case, the constants of commerce and conflict interact with an imagined new technology of flight (naturally the details are somewhat wrong but in general he has the right picture). Of course, there is some wish fulfilment going on here too: aerial warfare will be in Tennyson's view so ghastly that we will finally put aside warfare altogether.

    I think that poetry inspired by technology per se would be a bad idea. Partly it is the nature of poetry: a poem should be the most succint description of itself that is possible; if it can be condensed and rendered literal, then it isn't really a poem anymore. Nothing is more succint and accurate an explanation of a technology per se than that technology itself. Therefore technology is a poor choice as a source of poetic inspriation (not to mention the long term downside of becoming obsolete). Howver, relating the human experience to technology is a different matter. Technological change is, itself, a new constant in human experience.

    • Interesting.

      I think that poetry inspired by technology per se would be a bad idea.

      I think that's prejudicial.

      Partly it is the nature of poetry: a poem should be the most succint description of itself that is possible; if it can be condensed and rendered literal, then it isn't really a poem anymore.

      I believe it is in pursuit of this value and in neglect of others that contemporary poetry finds itself so lost to its audience, as another poster observes. The ineffable everyday object is burdened with all the aspirations of the poet.

      Nothing is more succint and accurate an explanation of a technology per se than that technology itself.

      That is interesting. There is, then, a poetry of the machine. Aesthetic value in the efficient expression of power, in its simplicity.

      Howver, relating the human experience to technology is a different matter. Technological change is, itself, a new constant in human experience.

      And this matter is not contingent upon change as a new constant. This is the fertile ground for technology within the poem: not as its focus but as its ground. The poetry of the junkyard, of the tramway, of the computer exists, but as notes within a melody more internal.


      • I believe it is in pursuit of this value and in neglect of others that contemporary poetry finds itself so lost to its audience, as another poster observes. The ineffable everyday object is burdened with all the aspirations of the poet.


        What I am talking about is economy, not necessarily obscurity. Not every poem has to be The Wasteland. Not every poem has to be hard to approach, but it does need to reward effort that goes beyond the superficial.

        You can't dismiss "contemporary poetry" in a broad sweep. The failure of poetry to capture a broad contemporary audience can't be laid to a single stylistic trend. If there was somebody who could capture the public's imagination the way Homer, or even Kipling did, then it would have been done by now. There are external reasons why poetry has declined in popularity. Among them:the availability and quality of artificial light. The natural change of pace and mood that the waning of the day brought to every generation of humanity before the twentieth century is gone. With it went a whole oral tradition of legend, storytelling, and poetry. Poetry is now a largely literary activity.

        Another is the availability of mass entertainment and media. In the nineteenth century, an illterate person might still have memorized a body of popular poetry, political doggerel, and popular drinking songs. Now, they are intimately familiar with the latest episode of "Friends".

        And yet another is that the pace and volume of information that a person deals with are much greater. This has driven a dual tendency in communication style towards terseness (good in my opinion) and vagueness (bad). Good poetry is never actually vague (in my opinion), but it at times may be dense or even self-contradictory.


        That is interesting. There is, then, a poetry of the machine. Aesthetic value in the efficient expression of power, in its simplicity.


        You must see that underlying this observation is a metaphor. The essence of this metaphor is this: we carry over this sense of the minimal sufficiency of a poem as a description of itself to some other thing that defies compact literal description. If somebody's dancing is poetry in motion, it means that a detailed breakdown of its components of it will fail to capture its net essence. You might say that the intricate lacework of girders and cables of a mighty bridge are "poetry in steel" -- this means that no literal description can have the same impact on the imagination as the thing itself. No literal description could capture the majesty of a truly great engineering work. But poetry actually could capture part of the human reaction to the drama of a great bridge.


        >I think that poetry inspired by technology per se would be a bad idea.

        I think that's prejudicial.


        Perhaps my position could be clarified in this way: I think technology and poetry exist in different realms of human endeavor, according to their own values of aesthetics and craft. If there is a place to look for poetry "inspired by" technology, it will be in the interface between their realms: between engineering form and norms of efficiency and function on one hand, and the subjective realm of sensuality, perception, and sympathy on the other.

        • There are external reasons why poetry has declined in popularity. Among them: the availability and quality of artificial light. The natural change of pace and mood that the waning of the day brought to every generation of humanity before the twentieth century is gone. With it went a whole oral tradition of legend, storytelling, and poetry.

          I haven't run across this idea before-- is it original?

          • I haven't run across this idea before-- is it original?

            I wish it were; I've heard this from a few folklorists, and found it compelling. How many of us have sat around a campfire and told stories? How many of us have tried our hand at storytelling in any other situation?

            Cultural anthropologists have just begun to ask how patterns of sleep differ in cultures that don't have artificial light and where clocks are scarce. One finding is that the people often go to bed shortly after dark and wake up near
  • Is a poem he wrote wehn his father died. It was on disk and erased itself as the poem progressed. It has been cracked, of course, and can be found here http://www.antonraubenweiss.com/gibson/gibson0.htm l
  • I think... (Score:3, Funny)

    by msouth (10321) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @11:16AM (#5493789) Homepage Journal
    ...that you shall never see
    A lovely poem about PIII's

    sorry, couldn't resist

    http://archive.salon.com/21st/chal/1998/02/10cha l2 .html
  • http://www.everypoet.com/haiku/default.htm
  • 5 Volts (Score:3, Informative)

    by Tal Cohen (4834) <tal@ f o r u m 2 . o rg> on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @11:21AM (#5493848) Homepage
    Here is 5 Volts [forum2.org], by Eran Tromer.
  • Alan Sondheim is the author of a lengthy meditation on the poetry and philosophy of cyberspace, The Internet Text [anu.edu.au], amongst (many) other things. He has used shell scripts and other techniques to generate texts. He writes about sex, death, the body, desire, trauma, capital, terror, etc.; technology and its implications remain an important theme throughout.

  • Have you tried the following?

    http://epc.buffalo.edu/poetics/

    (the buffalo poetics list is interesting)

    or alan sondheim
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=IS O-8859-1&q =alan+sondheim&btnG=Google+Search

    or Trace
    http://trace.ntu.ac.uk
  • Albert Goldbarth (Score:2, Interesting)

    by madisonriver (654678)
    I'm writing my thesis on physics in poetry, and I have to tell you you're probably out of luck finding a specific poet who writes mainly about technology. However, there are many poets out there who have written one or two poems about technology that are worth checking out. Check out a database like LitFinder (which I'm sure Columbia will have in their library system) and use the search option. Except for the exception: Albert Goldbarth writes awesome poems about physics, astronomy, geology . . . he's pretty well known, and loves science. I'd suggest his books "Heaven and Earth: A Cosmology", and "Marriage, and Other Science Fiction".
  • This guy's work [slashdot.org] might be interesting to at.

  • by hatless (8275) on Wednesday March 12, 2003 @11:46AM (#5494092)
    There are plenty of odes to technology from secular totalitarian states. Dig into poetry from the likes of the USSR, Communist China, North Korea, Nazi Germany and their satellite states for an endless supply of verse about rockets, hydroelectric dams, nuclear submarines, tractors and vaccination campaigns. Mao Zedong himself penned quite a few fetching works about rural electrification and massive irrigation projects in his day.

    It's not just for dictatorships, of course. No country that prides itself on its technological superiority over its neighbors can do without at least a few state-sanctioned sonnets about whatever it is the country produces. Major empires of any kind tend to produce plenty of it during their big expansionist periods. Go back to the 19th Century and you'll find plenty of American poems about the building of railroads, telegraph lines and steamships, for instance.

    Poems about technology tend not to hold up very well over time. A poem about a gigantic concrete dam isn't quite so resonant 30 years later when a dam twice as big is built a couple hundred miles upriver and the first dam is covered in scaffolding for 10 years at a time for repairs to some of that concrete and one of the turbines. A poem about an emotional moment in your life conjured up by seeing the dam covered in that scaffolding has a better chance of holding up. People tend to be more interesting than technology in the long run, and the good poems with, uh, technology in them tend not to be about technology at all.
    • A poem about an emotional moment in your life conjured up by seeing the dam covered in that scaffolding has a better chance of holding up. People tend to be more interesting than technology in the long run, and the good poems with, uh, technology in them tend not to be about technology at all.

      Given my lack of mod points I'll second this. I wouldn't even bother with the tact in this case either. If a poem is good then it is because it is to do with people in some way, whatever else it may reference.


    • The only technology-inspired poetic literature I can think of that isn't primarily totalitarian propaganda is a "novel"--which it's not; it's a book of poetry--by Mark Leyner called My Cousin, My Gastroenterologist.

      But, like hatless said, since it's Serious Literature, it's about people, not technology (one theme is tech-overkill's potential personality-disintegrating effects).

      Also, it's maybe the oddest, and probably the funniest, book ever.

    • This is an amazingly insightful comment. Our teacher in elementary school had the entire class write an "Ode to Voyager II". While it definitely piqued my interest in poetry, I found the process of invoking emotions for a space probe awkward to say the least. I always get an icky feeling whenever I see cold-war-era state-sponsored murals of people plowing in fields with rockets behind them in US universities. You're right, "totalitarian" regimes aren't the only ones that have created such presumptuous
  • Filippo Tommaso Marinetti [google.com], a Futurist Italian writer (1876-1944) was inspired by the technology of it time (among other things). I am not sure whether you can find online anything translated in english but judging from the google search there seems to be a number of pages in english dedicated to his work and you can certainly find some books.
  • How about homer -- it seems that he wrote a lot of stuff about the highest technology of his time, like bronze spears and fast black ships, and so on.

    Or, do you mean the hideously limited view of "technology" that only applies to something with a keyboard?
  • by ahknight (128958)
    Damn it, now you're going to make me do something with my domain, aren't you?
  • The danger of chest-beating notwithstanding, I published a volume of poetry
    in Norway in -96 called "The Cement Garden" using aggressively contemporary imagery
    and quite a bit of "sci-fi-y" stuff too.
    Problem is the sci-fi-y stuff is pretty much untranslatable due to the quite
    complicated verse.
    Anyway I'll just throw out two of the "contemporary" ones to show that one can
    make poetry that is not about an English 18 century meadow but set in modern technological
    life, and is NOT a limerick or light verse.


    The Wild Side

    Lou Reed in Brooklyn, 1978;
    Sniffing powder-dope and talking piss
    on CD-tracks that fix the date
    of unrenocicating "Fuck all this!"

    A microscopic hieroglyph maybe -
    a plastic-haiku lit by laser-light,
    illumined sparks of noise we cannot see,
    but still comes through the speakers all too bright.

    The rancid words are just a show,
    a twisted exclamation mark -
    the boy onstage who reads them knows
    he still is frightened of the dark,

    and blinks in spots of white-hot speed
    and pulls the same joke as Lou Reed.


    Remote Control

    Remote-control will guide me through
    the channels of pale electric blue,

    through frequencies forever stuck
    in all encompassing, final "Fuck!"

    and heroes never draws as fast
    as remote-control that flicks me past.

    Real and fictitious pieces of life
    (much like the words in this poem I write),

    to outweigh all the deaths you've seen
    in the radiance of the TV-screen,

    stubborn advertisement-flicks
    divided by a simple click,

    and where your face's forever free
    from pixel-old-age on TV.

    But the heavy bomber that slowly soars
    in a movie (from who knows what war),

    reminds me of the deepest fear:
    There's no control, remote or near.

  • Several different techno-fied versions of "The Raven" circle on the net. My favorite [netspace.org]:
    Once upon a midnight dreary, fingers cramped and vision bleary,
    System manuals piled high and wasted paper on the floor,
    Longing for the warmth of bed sheets, still I sat there doing spreadsheets.
    Having reached the bottom line I took a floppy from the drawer,
    I then invoked the SAVE command and waited for the disk to store,
    Only this and nothing more.

    Deep into the monitor peering, long I sat there wond'ring, fearing,
    Doubting, while the disk kept churning, turning yet to churn some more.
    But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token.
    "Save!" I said, "You cursed mother! Save my data from before!"
    One thing did the phosphors answer, only this and nothing more,
    Just, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

    Was this some occult illusion, some maniacal intrusion?
    These were choices undesired, ones I'd never faced before.
    Carefully I weighed the choices as the disk made impish noises.
    The cursor flashed, insistent, waiting, baiting me to type some more.
    Clearly I must press a key, choosing one and nothing more,
    From "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

    With fingers pale and trembling, slowly toward the keyboard bending,
    Longing for a happy ending, hoping all would be restored,
    Praying for some guarantee, timidly, I pressed a key.
    But on the screen there still persisted words appearing as before.
    Ghastly grim they blinked and taunted, haunted, as my patience wore,
    Saying "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

    I tried to catch the chips off guard, and pressed again, but twice as hard.
    I pleaded with the cursed machine: I begged and cried and then I swore.
    Now in mighty desperation, trying random combinations,
    Still there came the incantation, just as senseless as before.
    Cursor blinking, angrily winking, blinking nonsense as before.
    Reading, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

    There I sat, distraught, exhausted, by my own machine accosted.
    Getting up I turned away and paced across the office floor.
    And then I saw a dreadful sight: a lightning bolt cut through the night.
    A gasp of horror overtook me, shook me to my very core.
    The lightning zapped my previous data, lost and gone forevermore.
    Not even, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"

    To this day I do not know the place to which lost data go.
    What demonic nether world us wrought where lost data will be stored,
    Beyond the reach of mortal souls, beyond the ether, into black holes?
    But sure as there's C, Pascal, Lotus, Ashton-Tate and more,
    You will be one day be left to wander, lost on some Plutonian shore,
    Pleading, "Abort, Retry, Ignore?"
  • Will The Real Bruce Perens Please Stand Up [slashdot.org]

    Almost as good: USian Pie [slashdot.org]

    Ah, the good old days of Musical Trolls.

  • He's a Canadian poet whose poetry is very inspired by technology and science.

    Read about him a bit more here:
    http://www.vex.net/rikscafe/dewdney/Overvie w.html
  • It won't let me post it here (something about too few characters per line (Damn you Cowboy Neal1)), so here's a link to a relevant poem in my /. journal.

    Life in Binary [slashdot.org].

    Enjoy
  • ...are written by the science fiction fan community. Commonly called 'filk music' (the name is a typo of 'folk music'), technology is only one of the many themes used by this genre.

    Here are some links to technology themed filksongs:

    Steve Savitzky's computer songs [thestarport.org]. My favorite is The World Inside the Crystal [thestarport.org].

    There are other technologies besides computers though. Here are some songs about space exploration [mp3s.com] available as MP3s.

    Here is a list of links to science and technology filk songs [dnaco.net].
  • If I say 'Vogon Poetry [google.com]', I wonder if I'll get modded up or down...
  • You definitely want to have a look at Richard Kenney. His themes are largely technological and scientific. See particularly his collections Orrery and The Invention of the Zero, the latter of which deals with code very specifically. Here's a passage:

    Descent
    he said. O, luck! like Alice through the bisqueware
    chip, we've crossed our glass. What man in nineteen forty-
    two could have predicted that queer antecendent
    to the gunsight? Microchip: the square
    projection of the crystal ball -- imagi
  • The immunologist Miroslav Holub is a poet of great depth and subtlety. His poetry sometimes includes scientific concepts, and there's very definitely no boundary between his science and the rest of his worldview.

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