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Where is the Killer Calendar? 725

Posted by timothy
from the use-hired-elephants dept.
AnonaCow writes "Firefox and Thunderbird rock my world, but Mozilla's Calendar (Sunbird) has a long way to go. This maybe mundane, but what software does the slashdot community use to schedule? How do you keep track of your various appointments? What about your 'To Do' List?"
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Where is the Killer Calendar?

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  • Outlook 2003 (Score:5, Informative)

    by timothv (730957) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:26PM (#12792013)
    Outlook 2003, which has best calendar/todo interface I've seen.
    • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:5, Interesting)

      by ejdmoo (193585) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:28PM (#12792034)
      Ditto. I even do fancy color coding. It syncs with Exchange 2003, which allows for an always up to day copy on the web and on my pocket PC phone.

      MS did Exchange 2003/Outlook 2003 right.
      • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:3, Informative)

        by mr. methane (593577)
        For those who use the Treo, there's an app called "versamail" (I think) which sync's the palm calendar with outlook as well. It's not real-time, but pretty close to it (I think mine is set for hourly updates.)
    • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:30PM (#12792055)
      Yeah, I'm a big open source convert but email and calendaring are so critical to what I do that I simply can't stand not having the best. Even if it is sadly a ms product. Nothing comes close to MS Outlook 2003, not even outlook XP.
    • Absolutely. I am a scheduler power user. Outlook has everything I need and more. Very intuitive too. Not an MS fanboy, but I've yet to see anything that has the power/ease of use as Outlook.
    • Have to agree - I use Outlook (Office XP) and it syncs perfectly and transparently with my PDA and also my Windows-based SmartPhone - both via USB cables - and I use either the phone or PDA to 'carry' my appointments with me and also to sync them with my laptop and home PC - this all happens automatically whenever I plug one of the devices in for a charge (via a USB cable).

      In house we use eGroupWare's calendar for company and personal events - it does the job well, but the complaint is always that "it's n
    • Outlook 2003 is the best calendar/to do program available for Windows. The interface is refined and fairly quick.

      I run Slackware on my primary computer but there is nothing on the Linux side that comes close to Outlook 2003. Believe me, I've tried them all. I keep a Windows box around just for my scheduling. Microsoft also got Pocket PC right. I've never had a problem syncing my Dell Axim with Outlook 2003.

      I'm not a fanboy. I use the right tool for the job. For general computing and coding I use Li
      • by ozmanjusri (601766) <aussie_bobNO@SPAMhotmail.com> on Saturday June 11, 2005 @09:12PM (#12792334) Journal
        Outlook 2003 is the best calendar/to do program available for Windows.

        I know I'll probably get shouted down over this, but I switched from Outlook to Lotus Notes and have never looked back. The interface is, um, idiosyncratic, but once you get used to it, it's immensely customisable, and surprisingly effective at ensuring you know what you need to know.
        • Okay, normally I'm not one to shout, but I've got to on this one. First, I respect your opinion, and if Lotus Notes works for you, fantastic. But...

          I work at a really big company, and our e-mail/calendaring application standard is Lotus Notes. It has caused me nothing but immense pain and anguish. I've used and supported both Lotus Notes and Microsoft Exchange, along with their various clients, and I would much rather sell my soul to Bill Gates than use Lotus Notes a single day longer.

          I once compose

    • I am not sure if you were trying to be funny or not but outlook 2003 with exchange 2003 is IMHO the best calendar out there. Shareing appointments, booking recources (room, phones, server time, etc..) I use OSS as much as I can. I am up to 20% OSS in the server room in fact. However, for desktop scheduling nothing is better and I have pretty much quit looking at options for the last year unless I hear of something by word of mouth.
    • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:5, Informative)

      by gessel (310103) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @09:02PM (#12792275) Homepage
      Does anyone who ever worked on Outlook ever get on a plane? Ever? Do they know what a time zone is?

      There is only one program I've found that handles time zones correctly: TrueSync Desktop and it is abandonware. I kept buying motorola P8167s for years just so I could stick with TSD.

      There are two features of TrueSync Desktop that no other PIM seems to do correctly, and there is only one correct method. The two features are:

      1) When you create an standard event, you specify the time zone the event will happen in. All time zone math is handled automatically. This is the only correct method of handling events for people who travel outside their time zone regularly.

      2) When you mark a special day, say a birthday or a holiday, TSD remembers the date, rather than creating a 24 hour event from 0:00 to 23:59. This is the only correct way to handle special days.

      Consider the following scenarios, which I face almost every week:

      A) You are in California on the phone with someone in Boston planning a phone conference from 10:00-11:30am for next week at which time you'll be in London. What time should you set the conference for? Can you do the math? How about if you're in Phoenix in April? There are 31 time zones and almost all contain some regions that observe and some that do not observe DST. This is the sort of irritating arithmetic my computer should do, and only True Sync Desktop does it the right way.

      With Outlook can set your system time zone to the time zone the event will happen in, then create the event, then set your time zone back to the time zone you're in. Oh yeah, that's really convenient.

      B) You make a new friend on a visit a trip that includes a visit to Hawaii and Boston and put her birthday in your outlook/phone tools calendar. You get to San Francisco. What day is her birthday? With outlook when you change time zones the event straddles two days, only one of them the actual correct day. Depending on whether you travel east or west, the correct date is either the first or the second of the two days marked. How flabbergastingly stupid is that?

      Now one would think that _someone_ (anyone) involved in the development of outlook would, sooner or later, actually travel to a different time zone and realize just how utterly brain dead their handling of time zones really is (yes, outlook supports two (2)whole time zones, and for purely bicoastal people that's fine, but some of us actually travel to the flyover states occasionally. And some people even travel outside the US, which is still legal.)

      I personally can't stand the outlook look and feel. I find it sort of smothering, though I acknowledge that there are some good features to it, but if there's one good model for how a PIM should work it's True Sync Desktop, but since it won't sync to a modern phone, it's just not all that useful anymore, sadly.

      Thanks to my incessant whining, BVRP has put time zones on it's feature path, so Motorola's PhoneTools might soon correctly implement time zones and all-day events, probably more quickly if more people encourage them to.
      • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:4, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 11, 2005 @09:34PM (#12792455)
        Yes, I have exactly the same timezone handling requirement and surprisingly, the evolution calendar does it right. You can set separate timezones for the beginning and end of an event, which I particularly like for entering flights with the "local times" listed on the airline itinerary. You can also trivially change your timezone for viewing the calendar, independently of the timezone for your computer/shell environment.

        I've been using it for years now (since my reliable calendar stopped being supported on RedHat). They seem to have shaken most of the annoying bugs out of its time handling in the past few releases that are bundled with Fedora Core. What irritates me is that evolution wants so badly to be a suite when I just want a damn calendar to go with my fetchmail+procmail+sa+mutt+rsync+ssh+xterm distributed mail handling gyrations.
      • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:5, Interesting)

        by NotBorg (829820) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @11:29PM (#12792951)

        Does anyone who ever worked on Outlook ever get on a plane? Ever? Do they know what a time zone is?

        Anyone take an exchange server around the world? I maintain a few shipboard servers for the US Navy, and one thing I know (believe) is that Microsoft never intended for exchange servers to change time zones. If we update the time zone of the server, say advance it by one time zone, all scheduled events are off by an hour. The only solution we found that outlook, exchange, and some other software would work with (because they seem to have differing ideas about how to reflect the change) was to leave the time zone the same and just advance the clock.

        It seems also that both exchange and outlook have some if-then blocks to deal with some time zone changing, but nether knows what the other does about it. I'm not sure if this has changed with newer versions of the software (we are several behind the current).

        One would think that if the exchange server doesn't move (it usually doesn't), that outlook would work across time zone changes.

        • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:4, Informative)

          by halo8 (445515) on Sunday June 12, 2005 @07:14AM (#12794037)
          I can answer this because i had another customer with this exact same case 2 weeks ago

          the Exchange Team told me that the servers were never meant to have their time changed. Microsoft handles time changes on the client side (meaning windows) so windows adjusts the time for you and that reflects on the Outlook
    • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:3, Informative)

      by killjoe (766577)
      I could not disagree more. It's bloated, overly complex, has options buried 15 clicks deep, slow as hell, and really gives you no more functionality then dozens of other PIMs on the market for the windows platform. I used to be forced to use it at work, I am so glad I don't work there anymore.
    • Re:Outlook 2003 (Score:3, Insightful)

      by nihilogos (87025)
      Doesn't *anyone* on slashdot run linux anymore?
  • pen and paper (Score:4, Interesting)

    by IEBEYEBALL (827052) <anemmer@gmail.com> on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:26PM (#12792014) Homepage
    pen and paper, and sometimes pen on the back of my hand.
  • but what software does the slashdot community use to schedule? How do you keep track of your various appointments?

    .Mac?

  • Korganizer (Score:5, Interesting)

    by dangermen (248354) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:28PM (#12792033) Homepage
    Korganizer as part of Kontact does a decent job and it actually integrates with Exchange.
    • by rampant mac (561036) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @09:49PM (#12792522)
      "Korganizer as part of Kontact does a decent job and it actually integrates with Exchange."

      Shouldn't that be: "Korganizer Kas Kpart Kof Kontact Kdoes Ka Kdecent Kjob Kand Kit Kactually Kintegrates Kwith Kexchange."

      bork bork bork?

  • I use my PDA (Score:5, Interesting)

    by prockcore (543967) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:29PM (#12792041)
    Seriously. Until I can safely and securely use a remote calendar cross-platform (OSX and Linux and Windows), I'm going to stick with the PDA.
    • Re:I use my PDA (Score:2, Interesting)

      Same here. I have a p910 which is nice. I would use something on my computer, but I don't take that everywhere I go (yes, it is a laptop).
    • I would use mine but it isnt allowed on the premises at work. Damn security policy :(
    • Re:I use my PDA (Score:3, Informative)

      by Goeland86 (741690)
      you are right that the PDA is the best.
      Even better, to my mind, is that Linux (thus probably OS X, not sure) has a clone of Palm Desktop software: jpilot!
      That program does everything I need it to do: to-do list, address book, calendar...
      And it syncs with any Palm PDA. I love it, and wish there was one for windows.
      Outlook seriously bugs me, though I know that Jpilot doesn't have anything close to an Exchange server (because the PDAs don't use them to start with).
      So for small needs, a PDA, or PDA syncing app
  • So far... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tavor (845700) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:29PM (#12792043)
    Nothing I've seen beats the Paper calander. Customizable notes, available with any wallpaper you could ask for, and quirky quotes available upon request. User can edit most all of the interface by writing, cutting, and/or pasting objects into the suqres and into the pictures. Beat that, Outlook 2003!
    • Re:So far... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by CausticPuppy (82139) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @11:13PM (#12792887) Homepage
      Beat that, Outlook 2003!

      Easy. Your method sucks at the office, when you need to schedule a meeting of about 10 people at a time when everybody is free (you need to look at THEIR calendars) and find a conference room that is available for that time period, then track RSVP's. And you have to assume that everybody else actually writes all their own appointments on their calendars.

      That's a LOT of phone calls, walking around to cubicles, and collecting post-it notes. And then you're gonna wind up fighting over a room anyway with the other folks who got there first.
  • Korganizer (Score:5, Informative)

    by hardaker (32597) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:30PM (#12792048) Homepage
    I use Korganizer [kde.org] synced with a palm for my scheduling. It works quite well. Like any piece of software, it's far from perfect. But I'm continually impressed with what I can pull off with it. I really like being able to link in other schedules as well and have them available from a checkbox to display them or not. I have the fedora release schedule pulled from HTTP, my wifes schedule copied to my machine hourly from hers... Lets me quickly overlay multiple things.

    To make sure I look at it, my login session opens it whenever I log into my machine (and I do shutdown nightly just to start clean though it's hardly necessary). A cron job to open it every morning would be just as helpful.

    Obviously, this needs at least some level of KDE installed.

    • Re:Korganizer (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Nasarius (593729)
      I love Korganizer and Kontact, but I'm still looking for a decent Windows program that supports the vCalendar format. I dual boot by necessity, so it's frustrating. I've looked at a few online calendar apps, including Yahoo's stuff, but it's not great. I can't wait for Sunbird.
    • Re:Korganizer (Score:3, Informative)

      by d^2b (34992)
      Well, surprisingly enough, KDE is not required. There is a project call korganizer-pi [pi-sync.net] (pi=platform independant) that runs without KDE. Indeed, it runs on Windows. The UI is a little less slick than the latest Korganizer, but it does e.g., allow me to sync my laptop and my zaurus to a server via ssh.
  • Yahoo! Calendar (Score:2, Interesting)

    by TeleoMan (529859)
    Works for me. Email. Calendar. meh.
    • Re:Yahoo! Calendar (Score:5, Interesting)

      by eggoeater (704775) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:54PM (#12792224) Journal
      Yahoo Calendar rocks. I can access it from home and work (two different computers), it will sync up with my Palm (although the sync is a little kludgey), has a to-do list, etc., and the calendar sends me a text message (via an email address) to my cell phone to remind me of appointments.

      Way fricken cool. I'll never go back to a non-web based calendar.
  • Emacs Diary (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Greyfox (87712) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:31PM (#12792060) Homepage Journal
    Ow! Stop hitting me!

    Seriously though, the Emacs diary is pretty flexible, can be configured to give reminders of events and actually works pretty well as long as you have emacs up all the time. I like it better than anything else I've run across. The old PalmOS diary was pretty useful, too, but my last PalmPilot died a couple of years ago and I haven't found a PDA to replace it yet. I'm thinking of writing a webapp for calendar events and hooking it up to Asterisk to call my cellphone with reminders (Use festival for TTS or something like that *vague handwave*)

  • My To Do List Is... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by creimer (824291) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:31PM (#12792061) Homepage
    Post-It Notes.
  • by newdamage (753043) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:32PM (#12792064) Homepage Journal
    I gave the Mail/iCal/Address Book combo a shot when I first bought my iBook a year ago, but it just didn't do everything I was looking for and I didn't like having to keep 3 apps open at the same time.

    I've been using Entourage since Office 2004 can out for Mac. It's great, the mail client, calendar, to do list, and address book all integrate nicely. It really simplies all the things I need to do to stay organized.

    While I'm not sure it's worth the high price of Office, if you can get it through a campus agreement (like I did) for under $20, I'd recommend it.
    • I didn't like having to keep 3 apps open at the same time.

      Out of interest why?

      One of the things I hated when I had to use Windows (in business) was that unlike the OS I loved (RISC OS which doesn't have the concept of the MDI and everything is opened in its own window) it had big monolithic apps rather than lots of little ones that worked together.

      One of the things I like about OS-X (and the earlier MacOSes) is that they have relatively small apps that do work together.

      Isn't the point of the GUI to be
    • It seems like most major universities have some kind of deal with Microsoft to let students buy Office for cheap. Most of the time you can check with your schools IT department to see if your school is part of the program. And sometimes the school isn't part of the program, but individual colleges within the university are enrolled in the program. (The Computer Science dept I went through had the Microsoft agreement before the entire school did).

      And for people that graduated from College and are in the
  • by Scott Tracy (317419) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:32PM (#12792066)
    It's about the only PIM I've seen that can handle things like 'tomorrow', 'a week Friday' or 'next Thursday' in a date field and figure it out for you. Makes entering appointments and tasks quicker and more intuitive for me.
  • Decidedly low-tech (Score:3, Insightful)

    by c0d3h4x0r (604141) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:32PM (#12792069) Homepage Journal
    I sometimes stick personal appointments into my Outlook calendar at work, but for the most part, I simply don't keep a to-do list or a datebook or anything like that.

    I've found over the years that if I start compiling things into a "to-do" list or a schedule, then I'm more inclined (not less) to miss things or not do things, because they have officially become more of a nuissance by being on a list of things I feel obligated to do. When I just keep track of things mentally instead, then it doesn't feel like it's hanging over my head all the time and I feel like I can do it whenever I damn well please, which makes it more likely to actually get done.

  • by Xeroc (877174) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:32PM (#12792070)
    I actually use an organizer / to-do list that I programmed myself in PHP and Javascript (actually using AJAX!), so that I can access it and modify it anywhere in the world! (As it resides on a web server on my computer)
  • Kontact (Score:3, Informative)

    by InodoroPereyra (514794) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:32PM (#12792071)
    The answer for me is easy: kontact [kontact.org]. I use all the components, including KMail. It syncs the Calendar, TODO list, etc., perfectly with my PDA (a Sony Clie).
  • Evolution + iPod (Score:2, Interesting)

    by chesapeake (264414)
    I use evolution to do my calendaring and to-do lists. It's really quite good. I also prefer it as a mail client to thunderbird, which kinda irritates me for some reason (I still use thunderbird for reading usenet though).

    But this isn't much use if you can't read your calendar when you need to, so I use some of the scripts from gtkPod to sync my calendar, contacts and todo with my iPod. It works quite well, and since I carry the iPod around fairly often I can always get to the information.

    I have vague memo
  • I just use the Evolution calendar. Simple to use, and right there on my desktop at all times.
  • Scheduling? (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:33PM (#12792077)
    For scheduling? Why cron, of course...
  • It rocks my world. AIM and Yahoo screen names feed right into GAIM 1.3, my GNOME taskbar calendar shows my appointments right then and there, and it runs fast (at least for me).
  • PDA, actually (Score:2, Informative)

    by mkswap-notwar (764715)
    Actually, I still use my PDA. It's very flexible, not tied to whatever OS I'm booted into at the moment, and does everything you inquired about.

    And, if it doesn't do something that I need, I'll write something that does.
  • by helix400 (558178) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:35PM (#12792094) Journal
    Sunbird is currently undergoing a complete rewrite. I've worked with early builds of the new Sunbird, and it's looking pretty nice. Eventually, it should emerge with a much better framework to handle many Calendar and scheduling needs.

    Mozilla Lightning is also doing well in development. You can see some screenshots of it here (may load slowly): http://diary.e-gandalf.net/?p=35 [e-gandalf.net].

    It seems like these developers finally understand the great need for Calendar products. I frequently hear discussion of the most wanted features, such as different calendar formats, integration with other handhelds, etc.

    • I frequently hear discussion of the most wanted features, such as different calendar formats, integration with other handhelds, etc.

      How about integration with other calendar programs.

      iCal, Netscape Calendar, and Outlook- none of them actually work with each other (sorry, they DO NOT despite what anyone has told you; for example, an iCal calendar item's title won't show up properly in Mozilla Calendar.)

      It's pretty astounding that a simple file format like a frigging CALENDAR can't be standardized acr

    • I've been wondering how Lightning was coming along.

      * Can you send calendar invites to other users?
      * If you can, will the recipient be able to just click it and add it to their calendar?

      Those are two really basic things that are useful to have in a corporate/small business calendaring solution. Sadly, they're features that can tie people into Outlook.. :(
  • I use iCal, simply because of the iSync support and the ability to publish calendars easily (I have some third parties who schedule me on occasion for their clients, and it's easier to avoid being inadvertently double-booked if I publish my schedule for them to check). I sync between three different Macs (home, office, and PowerBook), my cellphone, and my PocketPC.

    I like MS Entourage a lot better than iCal, and if it had direct support for iSync I'd probably use it instead. Supposedly an update this summ
  • I wish you could mark a whole day on a calendar, but not tie it to a specifc task that needs to be checked off

    For example:

    Recycling day. Mark the day before the actual day to remind you to take it out to the curb. But if you miss it, no big deal.

    Pay day. Direct deposit, whoopee.

  • by l0ungeb0y (442022) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:45PM (#12792154) Homepage Journal
    I'm sure a lot of other people will or have said it,
    but iCal synched with iPod is bliss.

    Additionally, you can post your iCal schedule online and share it with .mac

  • by NeoThermic (732100) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:46PM (#12792158) Homepage Journal
    Being dyslexic and dyspraxic (it has its perks once and a while), I can't write well on paper. Infact, my fine motor control is so bad that it looks like a spider has died, rather than my todo list.

    So to organise anything, I use a whiteboard with pens. Why? Its better than any digital application as it works without power, doesn't require me to sit down to use it, and most importantly, it requires gross motor control, something that I still have.

    When you're able to write your todo list in 10cm letters at any time, able to check it off in many ways, and even the ability to doddle when bored, you'll see that there isn't a single application that can ever come close to a whiteboard.

    NeoThermic
  • Having a calendar client is all fine and good, but until open source calendar servers are as ubiquitious as Apache, a calender client isn't going to be a lot of use.

    An especially promising initiave in this are is the Hula project [hula-project.org].

  • Gregorian (Score:5, Funny)

    by macz (797860) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:49PM (#12792188)
    I have tried them all, Julian, Aztech... you name it. But I find that Gregorian does the job with minimal fuss and a high degree of accuracy (but not so much accuracy that it is cold and unfriendly.)
  • Horde Kronolith (Score:5, Informative)

    by egburr (141740) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:50PM (#12792193) Homepage
    www.horde.org See the kronolith project It's what I use for web-based email, calendar, address book, and more on my home server, and is available anywhere I have access to a web browser.
  • by Umbral Blot (737704) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @08:52PM (#12792202) Homepage
    sticky notes
  • Psion Agenda (Score:3, Insightful)

    by tverbeek (457094) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @09:35PM (#12792460) Homepage
    I have lived most of the past decade and a half in the "Agenda" programs included in Psion's PDAs. The EPOC5 version has everything I need: customised alarms, recurring events (by almost any formula), multiple prioritised to-do lists, embedded notes... I seriously haven't figured out what features it could be missing. Maybe someone who's used the more recent Symbian versions can clue me in.

    As a 5-year-old release, the Agenda version I'm using is probably getting hard to synch up with desktop- or network-based apps, but I've never really seen much point in doing that. I can check it whether I'm at the office, at home, or anywhere else, after all.

  • by wideBlueSkies (618979) * on Saturday June 11, 2005 @10:11PM (#12792604) Journal
    All,

    I have been meaning to ask this question to the community here for a while.

    I am looking for good task management software. And I haven't seen anything yet that does what I need. Please let me explain.

    I'm a project manager and Architect (software development) with 5 direct reports and an Offshore Team which I co-manage with others. It's a large project...30 people, over 4 years.

    At any given time I have approx 125 tasks out there, for myself and my team. I have been having a hard time keeping track of stuff using excel and pen and paper.

    I've considered writing the software I need (possibly in perl/perltk/mysql) but I don't have the time.

    I'm looking for something more flexible than MS Outlook...which is way too simple, but not as top heavy as MS project (which I use for long term planning...but does not really do what I need for task management).

    I should be able to assign a task with:
    -5 levels of priority
    -Task description
    -Status (not yet assigned, assigned, in progress, cancelled, hold, late, completed)
    -Proposed start and end dates
    -Actual start and end dates
    -Assign primary responsibility, backup, and off responsible helper
    -Task due to (group or individual)
    -Category (by my definition)
    -Sub-category (by my definition)
    -Status comments (by date)

    It should have the ability to assign subtasks to a task... for example, task 10, which is a UAT release, is dependant on task 15 which is a daatabase refresh assigned to our DBA. This requirement sounds like MS Project but I really don't need top heavy project plannig software in this case... just task management.

    Yhe tool should be able to generate reports and .csv files. For example : report of what's due for completion this week, or everything of priority 1 that is late to the clients)

    I should also be able to program it with a simple schedule, say a schedule of software releases and I should get reminders of what's coming up in the next X period of time.

    I am sure that someone else has needed this level of detail and control, and has this problem already solved. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    wbs.


    • My advice, IBM Lotus Domino products [lotus.com]. It's the most powerful, flexible, and comprehensive tool out there. Technically, it's a software development platform for collaboration and messaging. But there's a subset of tools called "Quickplace" [lotus.com] which includes out-of-the-box features that I think would be perfect for you.

      From the IBM Quickplace site:
      * Provides anytime, anywhere access to collective knowledge, information-sharing, tasks and team calendar events whether on-line or disconnected.
      * Sea
  • the real need? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by circusboy (580130) on Saturday June 11, 2005 @10:34PM (#12792709)
    I use iCal and it does for me, personally, especially since it syncs happily with 'basecamp.'

    But this is just for me. The real strength of Outlook, (as it has been mentioned before,) is really it's connection to an Exchange server. The problem is that it ties you to an Exchange server.

    If anyone has ties to the P2P networking world, *This* and not simple file sharing, would seem to be the killer app.

    can you imagine the ability to link and unlink with various groups and schedules via a peer to peer protocol? If there were a convenient way to connect a group of people's scheduling etc. without having to maintain a central server? and be able to segregate the views based on selected groups?

    hmmmmmm.

    though I suppose that you always need a central server for those who only occasionally connect, but that might be relatively easy...
  • by tezza (539307) on Sunday June 12, 2005 @04:49AM (#12793756)
    Wow, I can't believe no-one has mentioned Ecco Pro.

    It has:
    * Nested outline notes for everything
    * call tracker
    * looks just awful

    If the last is not too much, check it out. It's great. Available here thands to CompuSol [compusol.org]

  • Wikimedia (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Scarblac (122480) <slashdot@gerlich.nl> on Sunday June 12, 2005 @04:50AM (#12793757) Homepage

    I installed a Wiki on a webserver, behind a password. It's like using pen and paper with endless paper, it goes with you wherever you have an internet connection, and you have hyperlinks.

    My calendar is just a page with links to pages named 2005-06-12, 2005-06-13, with headers above them for month names. To-do lists, projects, whatever, I can make new pages just by typing a link to them and then starting to edit them.

New crypt. See /usr/news/crypt.

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