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Google Has All My Data – How Do I Back It Up? 215

Posted by timothy
from the widespread-problem dept.
shadeshope writes "Slowly but surely Google has taken over my computing life. How can I back it up? Bit by bit with their mantra, hip image and brilliant services, Google has gained my trust and all my data. I am doing almost all of my computing in the cloud. Google Reader, Calender, Email, Docs and Notes have become my tools of choice; even to the point where my day book, research notes, etc., are all on Google's servers. It was just so easy, enabling me to effortlessly work from multiple computers, operating systems and locations. I know, I know, this is foolish — all my eggs are firmly in one basket. It has crept up on me. As a long-time computer user and committed pessimist, I have used many schemes over the years to ensure my data is safe. Now I have ceded all control to Google. How can I regain some control and back this all up? Is there a one-touch solution that will take all my data from the various online apps and archive it on my home server?"
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Google Has All My Data – How Do I Back It Up?

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  • by LearnToSpell (694184) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:07PM (#24539269) Homepage
    Then the gov't will back it all up for you! Easy.
  • Easy! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Yvan256 (722131) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:08PM (#24539271) Homepage Journal

    Once you get all your data back, buy a Mac, subscribe to MobileMe and be safe, knowing that all your data is in the safe hands of a single compa...

    Oh wait.

    • Re:Easy! (Score:5, Funny)

      by Divebus (860563) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:16PM (#24539365)

      Idunno, Sergey. Ask Larry what he does.

    • Re:Easy! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:36PM (#24539529)

      Once you get all your data back, buy a Mac, subscribe to MobileMe and be safe, knowing that all your data is in the safe hands of a single compa...

      You chose a poor example. Pretty much all the Mobile Me services store the data both on Apple's servers and on the local machine, by default.

      I know you meant this as a joke, but your suggestion actually would allow a user to regain control of their data, albeit probably not in the most flexible way.

      • Re:Easy! (Score:5, Informative)

        by me at werk (836328) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:39PM (#24539553) Homepage Journal

        There's also notMac [notmacchallenge.com], which replaces .Mac.

      • Re:Easy! (Score:5, Interesting)

        by mpe (36238) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @05:09PM (#24539757)
        I know you meant this as a joke, but your suggestion actually would allow a user to regain control of their data, albeit probably not in the most flexible way.

        It might enable them to regain control of their future data. But they have almost certainly lost control of their current data.
        About the only way of retaining control over your data whilst having a third party store it would be if you encrypt in such a way that that party will never have access to anything other than the cyphertext. Which has the side effect that you can't process that data with web based apps.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Yvan256 (722131)

        Yeah I mean that as a joke (since a lot of people here think Apple is as evil as Google).

        Any sane person using Leopard will also have Time Machine enabled, on an external hard drive, meaning a local and external backup for most people, and three backups for those also using MobileMe.

        You're right, using a Mac as an example was the worst possible choice.

    • by fermion (181285)
      .mac, does serve one important function of a data retention plan. It provides multiple multiple and offsite backups of data. I can say it works pretty well. I have not lost much data since using it. I have data stored on my computer, on my phone, and on Apple servers. I am not sure what changes with Mobileme, though my suspicion is that data might become more susceptible to loss. This is because Apple does not provide a system to insure data integrity. I have lost individual files and bits of data ov
    • by jo42 (227475)

      "A Fool and his Data are soon parted."

  • Uh, Google? (Score:5, Informative)

    by clang_jangle (975789) * on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:09PM (#24539283) Journal
    Gbackup, of course! Well OK, not yer, but apparently coming soon [wordpress.com]. If you need it now, um, Google is your friend [lifehacker.com]. And there's more, if you check Google [google.com].
    And BTW, web apps != "the cloud".
    • Re:Uh, Google? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by SanityInAnarchy (655584) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:14PM (#24539335) Journal

      And BTW, web apps != "the cloud".

      Huh? Google web apps, at the very least, can be considered "the cloud", unless you are arguing that the term "cloud computing" has no meaning.

      • Re:Uh, Google? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by clang_jangle (975789) * on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:30PM (#24539483) Journal

        unless you are arguing that the term "cloud computing" has no meaning.

        Correct, it's an unnecessary buzzword (is that an oxymoron?) to cover something that's existed since the days of mainframes and dumb terminals. You know, that limiting, ancient paradigm that led to the microcomputer revolution because it sucked so bad? :)

        • Re:Uh, Google? (Score:5, Informative)

          by chunk08 (1229574) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:33PM (#24539507) Journal

          (is that an oxymoron?)

          No, it's needlessly redundant.
          Necessarily redundant is an oxymoron.

          (And so are many people when burnt.)/jokealert

          • by monk (1958)

            Necessarily redundant is an oxymoron.

            Unless you need failover.

            • by chunk08 (1229574)
              LOL ok, got me there. I was talking about in language. Of course, the English language could use failover many times...
        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by SoVeryTired (967875)

          You're confusing an oxymoron with a tautology.

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          is that an oxymoron?

          No, it's rhetorical tautology.

        • The big difference between a cloud and a mainframe is that the cloud itself runs on 'micro-computers' - so the old problem of the micro-computers obeying Moore's law and out-running the mainframe is obsolete. Anyway, cloud computing is the latest greatest thing, and you can expect many forwards of 'the website is down' until you agree:-).
        • by Nutria (679911)

          You know, that limiting, ancient paradigm that led to the microcomputer revolution because it sucked so bad?

          You mean the paradigm where data and apps are stored centrally, and some intelligence (like simple data verification) is passed out to the edge?

          Seriously, Dozens-of-web-servers-in-a-DC+AJAX+browser is the pendulum swinging back to the mainframe-in-a-DC+COBOL+CICS+3270 paradigm that we-who-are-old-enough derided as horribly ancient and dinosaurish.

          The reason that this paradigm survived and is returning

        • by gnuman99 (746007)

          In today's world of cloud computing synergies of Web 2.0, who needs backup? Information is there to be free!

          Is that enough buzzwords for today?

    • by pitchpipe (708843) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:23PM (#24539429)
      "Slowly but surely [Meth] has taken over my [...] life. How can I [get it back]? Bit by bit with [its seductiveness], hip image and brilliant [highs]. [Meth] has gained my trust and all my [money]. I am doing almost all of my [living] in the cloud. [Meth Labs and narco-traffickers] have become my tools of choice. Even to the point where my [home, business] etc are all [Meth labs].It was just so easy, enabling me to effortlessly work from multiple computers, operating systems and locations. I know, I know, this is foolish -- all my eggs are firmly in one [drug]. It has crept up on me. As a long-time [cocaine] user, and committed pessimist, I have used many [drugs] over the years to ensure my [highs] are safe. Now I have ceded all control to [Meth]. How can I regain some control and back this all up? Is there a one-touch solution that will take [] my [life] from the various [drugs] and [recover] it[]?"
      • by couchslug (175151) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @06:51PM (#24540461)

        "How can I regain some control and back this all up?"

        I suggest searching [Meth] for answers!

      • Actually you bring up a very good point in your humor, with the advent of the internet and google people are becoming increasingly addicted to data. Now, considering opportunity vs time cost which is ever present in our short lives so we end up giving up more and more of our data to the websites/cloud. Privacy in the coming age will be either a product for big companies, etc, or increasingly irrelevant as the web has shown (myspace/facebook generation). It seems in order to do anything and gain peoples t

        • Privacy in the coming age will be either a product for big companies, etc, or increasingly irrelevant as the web has shown (myspace/facebook generation).

          Unfortunately too many people give up their privacy with facebook/myspace, gmail, and online data storage. They use these so they'll expect others to use them too. I haven't signed up with any of them though I may join Photo.net [photo.net] when I start a photo business. Otherwise I want to keep my data local, I use an external drive for backup. And I want to run m

    • by plopez (54068)

      And BTW, web apps != "the cloud".

      Please enlighten me. What is the definition of "the cloud".

  • why bother? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    google's redundancy is legendary. why bother?

    i can see if they maybe canceled a service or somesuch, but that's highly unlikely, especially for their more popular stuff. (spreadsheets, email, pictures)

    i can understand the urge to keep it all local, but with their diversity, it's much more safe in their "cloud" than it would be at my house...

    • Re:why bother? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by corsec67 (627446) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:17PM (#24539377) Homepage Journal

      That would work, unless Google itself deletes your account [blogspot.com] or all of your email [techcrunch.com].

      Backups are meant to cover more than just hard drive failures, otherwise RAID 1/5 would be sufficient.

      Also, if you can't backup your data from Google, you can't switch from Google to anyone else, so you are locked in.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by hedwards (940851)

        Right, and not to mention that time that they had an error and a lot of people really did lose messages.

        Personally, I don't keep anything vital on google services except email. The email gets backed up via imap periodically.

        This works fine for me because I don't usually have items that I'd be upset about losing, most of the things I do have are not sent over email or are easily backed up individually.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Also, if you can't backup your data from Google, you can't switch from Google to anyone else, so you are locked in.

        Switch!? What is this crazy talk!

    • by STrinity (723872)
      What if they slowly transform their services into kludgy messes, as has already happen to their Usenet archive? Relying on a single company because you believe they'll never screw up is a recipe for disaster.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:11PM (#24539307)

    I don't know ... Google it

  • by SanityInAnarchy (655584) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:13PM (#24539319) Journal

    But Google solutions tend to at least support established open standards.

    That is: You can archive your Gmail account via IMAP. You can probably download your Google Calendar appointments as an iCal file. While I'm not sure of the best way to automate it, all of your documents in Google Docs are available in OpenDocument.

    Still, these are all "some assembly required".

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @06:07PM (#24540131) Journal

      But Google solutions tend to at least support established open standards.

      That is: You can archive your Gmail account via IMAP.

      You might have to rejigger some of your tags to end up with a folder structure in your IMAP archive
      Otherwise it'll just be all your mail in one folder.

      http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2007/10/nested-folders-in-gmail.html [blogspot.com]
       
      /Unless Gmail has changed something since that was written.
      //Personally, I don't consider tags a replacement for folders

      • //Personally, I don't consider tags a replacement for folders

        I consider them to be a superset, though I do wish they were hierarchical. Writing an open-source Gmail replacement is at #3 or #4 on my list of weekend projects. Unfortunately, the first one is taking more weekends than I anticipated...

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      "But Google solutions tend to at least support established open standards."

      Oh really? [blogspot.com]. You must have a new definition of 'standards'.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        You appear to have linked to yet another Google technology which is used internally, which they've open sourced because they've found it useful.

        It's no more relevant to this discussion than what filesystem they're using. (And, for the record, they rolled their own FS anyway.)

        Remember: I said "support open standards". I didn't say "exclusively uses open standards for everything, including stuff the public was never meant to see."

        Are you running on OpenFirmware? Have you flashed your BIOS with Coreboot?

        No? Th

    • by illumin8 (148082)

      That is: You can archive your Gmail account via IMAP.

      You can use fetchmail, a UNIX/Linux command line tool to grab all of your email from your IMAP enabled Gmail account and archive it somewhere else. It can even keep headers intact so it doesn't look like you forwarded all of your email. I would suggest getting another IMAP enabled email server somewhere, whether on a webhost or elsewhere, and have fetchmail run in a daily or hourly cron job, grabbing all new email messages and forwarding them to your ba

    • I back up my gmail and gcalendar in exactly that manner. I only use GDocs for simple publishing/sharing for just that reason - it could all go away, poof! and with no recourse or backup available.

      Of course, an electromagnetic pulse could achieve the same result on my home computer, I suppose. Life would probably go on, albeit with challenges.
  • Not one solution (Score:5, Informative)

    by vrmlguy (120854) <samwyse.gmail@com> on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:13PM (#24539327) Homepage Journal

    Thunderbird can back up gmail, and the Zindus extension will back up you address book. Lifehacker had a story in the past month about using wget to backup your del.icio.us bookmarks; I presume it can be adapted to Googlepages and your blog. Finally, if you install Google Gears, a lot of content will be cached on your laptop. I don't know how you'd retrieve it, but at least you'd know where it was.

  • by XxtraLarGe (551297) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:14PM (#24539343) Journal
    File -> "Save As..."
  • Google has their own backups I am sure. So the only way your data would be lost is if the entire Google company goes under. And would you really want to live in a world without Google?
    • Re:why back up (Score:5, Insightful)

      by jsebrech (525647) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:27PM (#24539457)

      Google does NOT have your backups. They have redundancy in their data storage, but when their servers get the command to delete something, it gets deleted everywhere, permanently!

      See their own faq: http://mail.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?answer=50208 [google.com]

    • by Yaa 101 (664725)

      Yes please... Besides I did before too. :-)

    • Re:why back up (Score:4, Interesting)

      by John Hasler (414242) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:29PM (#24539471) Homepage

      > Google has their own backups I am sure.

      What makes you think that they back up the users' data? (Note: users, not customers.)

      • by mpe (36238)
        What makes you think that they back up the users' data? (Note: users, not customers.)

        Not being able to restore a "user's" data, for the benefit of that user dosn't mean that they don't back it up for the benefit of someone else...
  • by mnslinky (1105103) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:16PM (#24539367) Homepage

    Use the Google services only where necessary. We've been doing this for a company I've started, but we only put documents and information on Google's services while we need it there. Not only is all our data on our backup server, but we only put data on their servers while it's needed. Visiting customer sites, etc.

    In addition, isn't this the kind of thing that makes laptops so great? Bring it with you! There are tons of sharing apps about for various uses. Use a VPN and sshfs for remote file access. Use iCal/whatever to sync with your google calendar. That sort of thing.

    In short, slowly migrate to a safer solution you're in more control of. You may lose a bit of your convenience, but safe data is worth it, in my opinion.

    • by silanea (1241518)

      [...] we only put data on their servers while it's needed. Visiting customer sites, etc. [...]

      I do hope you don't put any sensitive data there, like any kind of customer data? At least at my current employer we'd grill you for good if we found out about something like this. We already have quite a hard time keeping our employees from storing company data anywhere outside approved locations. Contractors are required to sign an agreement that forbids them from doing such a thing under penalty (along with requiring them to encrypt all data they receive from us).

  • Cloud Addiction (Score:5, Interesting)

    by daveime (1253762) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:20PM (#24539409)
    As a long-time computer user, and committed pessimist, I'd have hoped you'd think about backups long before you placed all your trust in the cloud.

    This is exactly the model that all clouds will eventually mutate into ... once enough people become dependent on the cloud, they will announce it will become a paid service the following week.

    Your eggs, Google's basket.

    Cat got your tongue? (something important seems to be missing from your comment ... like the body or the subject!) Erm, you mean you can't detect which it is ???
  • by vic-traill (1038742) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:21PM (#24539413)

    Does This 'Ask Slashdot' have the air of a troll to anyone else? It's like the questioner is serving it up so that every Google-hating/privacy-loving/I-told-you-so'er can go *apeshit* on it.

    • by Nymz (905908) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:45PM (#24539601) Journal
      While /. management might encourage /. editors to troll in order to drive page views and profits, I imagine there are a number of people out there, that one day woke up and realized 'the Google has you Neo'. Not that Google is the only bad guy, or that they must be demonized. But each person or company needs at some point to take some responsibility for themselves. Asking /. readers for a little advice seems reasonable.
    • by Aladrin (926209)

      It does, except that I want to know this. I have only put a few docs on Google Docs, but I'd like an easy way to back that stuff up so I never lose it. I can manually save each one, but I'd rather push a button and go eat lunch, instead.

      Someone above suggested writing a script that automates it, but let's be honest... I'm lazy. If someone else writes it, that means I don't have to. If Google writes it, I'll feel pretty confident about it working and being there when I want it.

      I'm not so crazy yet as to

  • Backing up email (Score:3, Interesting)

    by betelgeuse68 (230611) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:37PM (#24539543)

    Use Outlook and connect to GMAIL through IMAP, then save off your email to a .PST file via the Import/Export tool.

    -M

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Ewww... Outlook? PST file?! I think you're on the wrong site.

      • And you want to suggest linux users to do what exactly?

        I'm a pro-linux myself but he actually gave some good advice.

        • by Haeleth (414428)

          Um, just because someone doesn't use or like Outlook doesn't mean they're a Linux user.

          Outlook is a complicated and expensive business-oriented tool, used primarily by people who need to connect to Exchange servers. Most Windows users, if they use a desktop mail client at all, use either Outlook Express (which has nothing to do with Outlook whatsoever), its successor Windows Live Mail, or a third-party client such as Eudora or Thunderbird.

    • Use Outlook and connect to GMAIL through IMAP, then save off your email to a .PST file via the Import/Export tool.

      -M

      I use Outlook to retrieve my gmail via IMAP. It appears that only the headers and subject line are downloaded all at once. Only until you open an individual email will it actually download the rest (including attachments).

  • I remember not so many years ago people would say here that they would never ever trust their data with an online storage company. Far too dangerous: they can read your data, what if they go bankrupt or something goes wrong and you loose your subscription, etc etc. Now suddenly people don't make local backups anymore. I wonder whose RDF is larger: Google's or Steve's?

  • one-touch solution? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Noke (8971) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @04:58PM (#24539705) Homepage

    Is there a one-touch solution that will take all my data from the various online apps and archive it on my home server?"

    no.

  • I use http://www.gmail-backup.com/ [gmail-backup.com] to backup my gmail accounts. It works with regular gmail and google apps gmail. It has a click and backup view, but I use the cmd line interface to automate a daily backup of all my mail and labels to a folder as .eml files. It also lets you restore to gmail if needed. It has a few quirks, but over all is very useful.

  • by Bazman (4849) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @05:07PM (#24539753) Journal

    If I delete something at work, and then six months later think 'whatever happened to that file?', there's a chance it'll be on our backup archive and I can get it back. Or I can roll back to any of the last week's daily backups. Can Google do that? Has anyone tried? Does it keep versions?

    They seem to encourage you to not delete anything, but that doesn't help with undoing several revisions of a document, does it?

    I'm not a big google docs user, so I might have missed this somewhere.

    • by maglor_83 (856254)

      They have a revisions tab with this for spreadsheets at least. I've never used their other stuff, but I assume it would be the same.

  • by CaptainTux (658655) <papillion@gmail.com> on Saturday August 09, 2008 @05:20PM (#24539837) Homepage Journal

    First, Google did not 'take over' your life or your data. You willingly gave it to them and, now that you find yourself a bit worried about the implications of one company having all of your data, you are trying to paint them as some sort of evil entity that cajoled and nearly forced you to turn over your data to them.

    They didn't.

    Take responsibility for your decision to hand over your data. Just because a service or company is cool and sexy doesn't give them any special powers to make you do anything. Google included.

    Now, as to backing up your data, I'm not sure what the problem is. Google isn't holding your data hostage at all. With the exception of maybe Notes, you can get your data from Google to your local machine pretty easy:

    Email: setup a POP3 client and download all your mail to your machine from GMail.

    Documents: Go to FILE->DOWNLOAD AS and export each document to a file on your hard disk.

    Reader: Spend some time looking at each feeds URL and bring them into a desktop feed reader.

    Calendar: Find a tool (and there are some, I just can't think of the name now) that will allow you to bring Google Calendar data off of the server and into a local app.

    The truth is you are not a slave to Google. You can leave anytime you want. That doesn't mean it's not going to take a little work on your end to do so but, then, why shouldn't it? YOU chose to go 100% with Google (as many of us have including me) and it isn't Googles responsibility to make it super simple for you to up and leave.

    • Calendar: Find a tool (and there are some, I just can't think of the name now) that will allow you to bring Google Calendar data off of the server and into a local app.

      For Calendars and Mail, here's what I do (Mac OS X 10.5):

      • Spanning Sync for 2-way syncing of contacts and calendar to Address Book and iCal, respectively
      • Mail.app for IMAP sync of email
      • A (rather convoluted, I must say) series of backup jobs using JungleDisk [jungledisk.com], which mirrors to Amazon S3 using encryption; I guess Mozy or Carbonite (if they ever manage to come up with a Mac client) would be the same.
      • Time Machine to keep hourly incrementals over WiFi both at home and at the office
      • SuperDuper for disk mirroring to
  • by beaststwo (806402) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @05:30PM (#24539875)
    I wonder precisely what promises Google has made and what responsibilities have they disclaimed themselves of? As any business school graduate knows, one of the keys to keeping customers is to make it easy to start with them but tough to leave.

    Does Google owe any level of data integrity and privacy? Do they owe return of user data without claiming rights to use it otherwise? Do they make any promise of data protection and disaster recovery? What due diligence does the use owe in the process?

    As we move to an environment where more and more people simply 'trust" corporations to hold and protect their (potentially personal) data, I fear that we're way ahead of the law in defining the rights and responsibilities of both users and providers. In the absence of law, providers, such as Google, will write naturally terms of use that mostly benefit themselves. Users will simply lose.
    • by John Hasler (414242) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @06:34PM (#24540319) Homepage

      > In the absence of law, providers, such as Google, will write naturally terms of use that
      > mostly benefit themselves.

      Real providers with whom you have a contract are obligated by law to do whatever the contract says they have to do (assuming that you hold up your end by paying the bill). Advertising agencies such as Google that provide free services for promotional purposes have no legal obligations to their "users" whatever. Nor should they.

      • by Durindana (442090)

        Erm if Google is providing a service, it's a "real provider" of that service, whether Google chooses to charge for it or not... are you suggesting there is no contractual relationship between users of Google services and Google?

        I haven't read any Google ToS/EULAs (I don't use gmail et al), so I don't know their terms, but... those assuredly are contracts, and I would be pretty damn surprised if they didn't disclaim Google's liability for all sorts of things. If that were not the case, it seems like it would

  • I'm personally excepting to Conduit [conduit-project.org] to fulfill my needs in backing up from different sites. Of course synchronizing is different from backing up, but when I have all the data on my local machine I can backup those easily.

    I'm not very keen in using Google or any other services for my calendar, contacts, photos etc. data. If I'll think I'll need on-the-fly syncing, I'll rather just setup a sync server on my home server.
  • OK, don't go there. It's just some lousy advertising site. It's just that if it weren't taken, I might have used this domain to run the hypothetical service I've been talking about for months now: backdown, as opposed to backup. It would be just what you're talking about--something that takes all this web app crap and pulls it back down to your local box. Ideally, you should be able to change services. I began to think of this when I realized I was accumulating a lot of metadata for my photos in Flick

  • whatelse? (Score:2, Informative)

    by jsim (1341765)
    Mail - Download use POP3 or IMAP

    Documents - Use "offline access for Google Docs"

    Contacts - export to CSV or vCard

    calendar - export it as a private address in ical format (also XML, html)

    blogs - HTTracker

    photos - try picasa

    what else?

  • already to 111 posts and non one has says:

    all your data are belong to google /. I am disappointed.

  • by MichaelPenne (605299) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @08:10PM (#24541133) Homepage
    Google Docs Offline [google.com] If the 'cloud' explodes, I guess you can open your Docs offline folder with a web browser, and save the documents as OO, HTML, etc. Other folks have posted about using IMAP to get your email, etc.
  • I'm sure Google provides an online backup service of some sort. Use that and you'll be fine.
  • several solutions (Score:3, Interesting)

    by speedtux (1307149) on Saturday August 09, 2008 @10:35PM (#24542101)

    Mail and Calendar, you can simply back up by subscribing to them using IMAP/POP and iCal.

    Google Sites, you can kind of backup with wget; just make a copy of the site from a cron job.

    For Google Docs, you can use Gears; it won't be a full backup, but it will have local copies of the most important documents, and you can cut-and-paste out of that in a pinch.

    In the long term, something like Gnome Conduit will probably solve this problem once and for all; until then, one just has to muddle through.

  • What do we do?

    Googles applications and services (thus far) are still completely within my 'non evil' threshold, they are useful, convienient, fast, cross platform etc etc.
    Google docs has an incredibly important spreadsheet in there, which I can manually backup but interestingly I would also like to add a password to it (beyond the pass required for my google account) I wish they'd add that feature too, because if anyone ever reads that spreadsheet with malicious intent, I'm @$%#ed!

    Anyone got any ideas on ho

  • Putting stuff in the cloud sorta worries me as well, which is why I've kept out of it.

    I find that things like Picassa are OK because these are only copies of your digital stuff at home. But even then, your comments, captions and arrangements would, it seems belong to them.

  • I don't actually use the google stuff all that much... but I set up gmail to forward all mail to my home account.

    Also I have goosync publish all my calendar and contact data from my palm onto the site. I guess I could use it to go the other way as well.

    Don't know what to do about google docs, other than to export everything to local files. I really haven't used it, though the collaboration features seem interesting.

  • http://www.google.com/a/help/intl/en/users/terms.html [google.com]

    You agree to comply with your company's data usage and privacy policies.

    So in other words, don't put important company information on their servers without permission. In other words, that end run you are doing around your companies security policies is a violation.

    You agree that Google has no responsibility or liability for the deletion or failure to store any Content and other communications maintained or transmitted by Google services.

    No backups, no li

There is no royal road to geometry. -- Euclid

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