Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
GUI Programming

IDEs With VIM Text Editing Capability? 193 193

An anonymous reader writes "I am currently looking to move from text editing with vim to a full fledged IDE with gdb integration, integrated command line, etc. Extending VIM with these capabilities is a mortal sin, so I am looking for a linux based GUI IDE. I do not want to give up the efficient text editing capabilities of VIM though. How do I have my cake and eat it too?"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

IDEs With VIM Text Editing Capability?

Comments Filter:
  • by Paradigm_Complex (968558) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @03:36PM (#30598336)
    Could anyone explain the reason why simply extending vim is being ruled out? Why is it considered a "mortal sin"?
  • by dkleinsc (563838) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @03:46PM (#30598510) Homepage

    Try Emacs.

    Seriously. The integration with gdb, gcc, etc is where Emacs really shines. Yes, the Control-Meta-cokebottle commands are a bit annoying, but there's worthwhile tradeoffs there.

    The first post was also quite useful. And to be fair, I like vim too.

  • Gvim (Score:4, Insightful)

    by theinvisibleguy (982464) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @03:47PM (#30598536)
    Gvim is pretty good, it might still be too lean for what you are asking for, I would say it's more an intermediary step between vim and a big gui ide.
  • by Subliminalbits (998434) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @03:49PM (#30598570)

    The poster probably doesn't want to have to learn keybindings for a new editor. He may even already know them but just prefers vim keybindings. What he really probably wants is the luxuries of of a full IDE without having to give up the editing flexibility and familiarity he has with vim.

  • Extend Vim (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Finder83 (829130) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @04:04PM (#30598760)
    Mortal sin? First, get over your ridiculous predisposition against extending vim. Vim is built to be extended, and extending it can make it much more useful as a tool and not just an editor. If you're good enough in Vim to prefer it as a text editor, then make it comfortable as an environment. There are some amazing extensions for vim, that for me at least, make me much more productive than using an "IDE". Fuzzy file finder, exuberant ctags with taglist, minibufexplorer...
  • Re:Emacs! (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @04:05PM (#30598764)

    Old joke. Stop using it. Now.

  • by Fujisawa Sensei (207127) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @04:45PM (#30599284) Journal

    Try Emacs.

    Seriously. The integration with gdb, gcc, etc is where Emacs really shines. Yes, the Control-Meta-cokebottle commands are a bit annoying, but there's worthwhile tradeoffs there.

    The first post was also quite useful. And to be fair, I like vim too.

    Been there, done that, emacs, x-emacs, emacs with the GTK stuff. Am sticking with vim. I've been using vim since 1992-1993, back on my Amiga.

  • by Splab (574204) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @04:50PM (#30599352)

    I've only been using VI for 10 years, but still is almost impossible for me to work in any editor now where there aren't modes.

    What made me choose VI over Emacs back in the day [tm] was the fact that my hands aren't build for the ctrl voodoo used in Emacs.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @07:01PM (#30600656)
    Have you tried swapping Caps Lock and Control?
  • by FreeBSD evangelist (873412) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @07:06PM (#30600702)

    If you wanted lean and fast, you'd run vi, not vim.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @07:14PM (#30600768)

    The 1960's called and said they want their smelly hippy beards and antiquated programmer tools back.

    Some suggestions for future installments of Ask Slashdot:
    - How do I set up Microsoft Word 2007 to recognize the DOS WordPerfect key bindings?
    - Should I be feeding my dinosaur a vegan diet?
    - How can I make an mp3 player out of rocks?

  • by martin-boundary (547041) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @07:38PM (#30600982)
    People often say that the control key combinations are difficult in Emacs, but this is only so if 1) you don't touch-type and 2) your keyboard is older than 20 years. On a modern (=post 90s) keyboard, there are two control keys and two alt keys, one for each hand.

    Here's how you should type a typical Emacs chordal command: use both hands. For example, M-x is typed by pressing the x with the left hand, and the ALT with the right hand. This is touch typing 101. (Similarly, you would type a capital letter by pressing the letter with the nearest hand, and pressing shift with the other hand.)

    You can still reprogram your keyboard, and you can change the key combinations in your .emacs if you prefer something else, but if you think about it a little, all the commands you're likely to need can be typed comfortably if you use both hands simultaneously.

  • by tempest69 (572798) on Wednesday December 30, 2009 @08:50PM (#30601538) Journal
    if I want line 200 I type in 199j from the top..

    if I want to change all of the X to - in an amino acid sequence line I type :s/X/\-/g

    yea.. I'm sure that emacs can do it too.. But once all that brainpower is invested, theres no way I'd bother with emacs.. It's like a secretary changing to dvorak after she's hit 200wpm

    vim is fast, powerful, user friendly, and quite picky about it's friends.

    Storm

"If there isn't a population problem, why is the government putting cancer in the cigarettes?" -- the elder Steptoe, c. 1970

Working...