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Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Learn About Game Theory and AI? 152

Posted by Soulskill
from the watch-scifi-movies-from-the-eighties dept.
xmojox writes "I would like to learn more about Artificial Intelligence and Game Theory. I know these are both large areas of study; however, my main interest is in how these affect decisions in the world. This would include politicians, business people, and general society. I'm not looking for a career or anything; this is just a personal interest of mine. Where are good places to start in these areas for somebody new to them? I'm aware of the Stanford on-line classes, but those don't work with my current schedule."
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Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Learn About Game Theory and AI?

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  • Russell and Norvig (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @01:50AM (#37523658)

    Grab a copy of Russell and Norvig. It's a nice survey, and a fairly easy read.

    • by ArAgost (853804)
      Seconded. There's everything you need, and it's also well written. No wonder it's a de facto standard in universities everywhere.
      • No the correct answer is : "You want to learn the basics for no other use than misrepresenting it in political discussions ? Please don't."

        • by ArAgost (853804)
          You do raise a very interesting point, which would be worth discussing far more than my limited attention span and the hostility to long form writing of this input box allow me to.
          I do think that the interest of OP goes beyond the superficial coverage of these topics we often see in press and politics, and this is already made evident by the fact he came here to ask. Moreover, even a cursory read of the Russel-Norvig brings no risk of misrepresentation - that's exactly why I loved that book: clear language
    • Seconding this. Norvig is also teaching a free class online next month from this text through Stanford.
  • See: http://www.lenfisherscience.com/books/rock_paper_scissors.html

  • by ThorGod (456163) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @01:57AM (#37523708) Journal

    -bone up on your probability (continuous/discrete distributions, transformations, etc)
    -grab a book on statistical decision theory like Parmigiani and Inoue or Berger (85).
    -read Von Neumann/Morgenstern

    • by scottgfx (68236)

      Many years ago I read the book "Prisoner's Dilemma".

      Interesting book with a bit of Game Theory and biography of Von Neumann.

      Thought it interesting to note that my father's and Von Neumann's lives ever-so-slightly intersected at Operation Crossroads.

      • by ThorGod (456163)

        Thought it interesting to note that my father's and Von Neumann's lives ever-so-slightly intersected at Operation Crossroads.

        That's pretty cool! Never heard of Operation Crossroads before, but it sounds like it was the second nuclear test?

    • by Slugster (635830) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @05:10AM (#37524484)

      -read Von Neumann/Morgenstern

      I have the Von Neumann/Morganstern book. It is very heavy reading, Rain-Man level stuff. Unless you're rich or its really cheap, it's a good idea to thumb through a copy before buying.

      On the other [fuffy] end of the spectrum is Prisoner's Dilemma by William Poundstone. A 1-2 hour read suitable for teens, with no difficult math and a lot of real-world examples.

      • by sammyo (166904)

        The first chapters of Theory of Games and Economic Behavior is quite accesable, at least it was when I got my copy in high school. Do to be able to grasp the idea of a matrix.

      • by ThorGod (456163)

        I'm under the impression that this is a legal source:
        http://www.archive.org/details/theoryofgamesand030098mbp

        Has pdf/epub/kindle/etc versions of NM. (As well as lots of other good reads!)

  • Less Wrong (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Bob9113 (14996) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @02:00AM (#37523724) Homepage

    I haven't had much time to dig in yet, but I hear good things about Less Wrong [lesswrong.com] from some friends who are into game theory, ai, and sociology.

    Here's their front page blurb:

    Thinking and deciding are central to our daily lives. The Less Wrong community aims to gain expertise in how human brains think and decide, so that we can do so more successfully. We use the latest insights from cognitive science, social psychology, probability theory, and decision theory to improve our understanding of how the world works and what we can do to achieve our goals.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by GrimmParoD (2468306)
      You should be careful with communities assembled around prohibited subject matter. Game theory is one thing - Singularity class AI would be so disruptive that it may be assumed unregulated advances in the field could get you 'cleaned up' in pretty short order. People peddling entre into communities gathered around such subjects should be considered suspect unless they openly tell you that any significant contribution will likely come with total loss of your freedoms.

      This fact gets conveniently left out
    • by Hatta (162192)

      Right at the top of the page they have a line endorsing human rationality. Right next to that is a link to a singularity summit. There is no hint of irony in the juxtaposition. That's a big red flag right there.

  • by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @02:01AM (#37523736)

    I'm aware of the Stanford on-line classes, but those don't work with my current schedule

    Why? You can just watch the videos instead of doing the homework, or watch them sometime later and do the homework then.

    But if you really had any interest you would be shifting around everything else, including sleep, to take fullest advantage of these classes in real time.

    • by manwargi (1361031)
      Not only that, the AI class has a "light" version that's simpler than the full course.
      • by fartrader (323244)

        Its a good thing that everyone seems to be clairvoyant and understand how the OP *can* indeed fit it in to his current schedule when he says he can't. Maybe he has a 100 hour a week job, a demanding girlfriend, 200 kids or all three. ...and "interest" doesn't mean you give up sleep. Perhaps if he was interested in two things he should give up eating as well.

        Reasonable question asked - with reasonable parameters - unreasonable dissection.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          demanding girlfriend - is that what the kids are calling xbox these days?

        • by Threni (635302)

          I like how you sarcastically, and unintentionally, give the exact same answer! He doesn't work that long, have that many kids etc, and therefore COULD in fact find the time.

          Another possibility is that there's no way for him to learn this stuff as there's no way of doing it without leaving the girlfriend, drowning some kids etc.

        • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

          by HeckRuler (1369601)
          Hi Fart rader,
          I'm interested in subject X, could you help out? I know that I could go google things, work through tutorials, and browse the communities that are dedicated to subject X, but I want your input. Also my schedule is pretty busy. So I'm looking for some way to spend zero time to get real meaningful advances.
        • by mattack2 (1165421)

          But if he has ANY time to learn something.. How would he by definition NOT have time to watch a video he can watch whenever he wants... but WOULD have time to read a book or something?

          (The only reasonable case I can think of would be time on a subway or bus without a net connection -- I have no idea if the Stanford videos are downloadable to watch offline.)

        • by manwargi (1361031)
          If the OP isn't even willing to attempt the casual watered down version of an already free class and it didn't occur to him to read the book, or even a book on the subject, then I guess he has no choice but to hook himself up to the Nebuchadnezzar through a socket in the back of his neck and download the information he seeks.
      • by Dr Max (1696200)
        I think it's the same course just minus the assignments and exams and you don't get the same certificate.
    • Anyone who has any interest but hasn't already looked into it themselves, is not going to be interested in getting up at 4am. Nor do I think it would do much use. Why, if you can watch the video?

      Personally I wouldn't even bother with the videos, just read the book.. I might dig it out and see if it has any Lambda Calculus stuff - I'm about to go through Norvig's book on AI/Common Lisp.. and my memory of LC is really rusty.

    • by elsurexiste (1758620) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @08:55AM (#37525352) Journal

      Why? You can just watch the videos instead of doing the homework, or watch them sometime later and do the homework then.

      Maybe xmojox isn't around a PC for hours, because of his/her job, and spend a few more hours commuting. Maybe he/she has no tablet that's easily carried. We are not to judge. If we don't believe what's telling us, we may as well think this question is just an attempt at trollling and stop wasting our times.

      But if you really had any interest you would be shifting around everything else, including sleep, to take fullest advantage of these classes in real time.

      Worst. Advice. Ever. If you don't sleep at least six hours, you'll notice. It isn't sustainable.

      On topic: Check Wikipedia's page for Game Theory and go to the citations. There you'll find a few books and other resources you can read.

      • Maybe xmojox isn't around a PC for hours, because of his/her job, and spend a few more hours commuting. Maybe he/she has no tablet that's easily carried. We are not to judge.

        I am. I'm working 60+ hours a week, including weekends, and I'm taking the class.

        I'm making the class work because I do have a deep interest in AI, but more importantly want the chance to ask questions from experts as I learn and see what other questions people ask while I learn, because I know this well help substantially with retentio

    • by xmojox (2468846)
      Between work and other studying obligations (which my job depends on) ... I can't commit myself to that kind of structure. If I just could download the videos or watch them at any time, likes month or so after they have been posted then I could do it. Any idea if this is possible?
      • by Rakishi (759894)

        An older version of the machine learning class videos actually given at Stanford is available here:
        http://see.stanford.edu/see/courses.aspx [stanford.edu]

        Despite the title saying "Machine Learning| Artificial Intelligence" it seems to be only the Machine Learning class.

        That said, the AI class may be more useful for you unless you plan to do hardcore machine learning. The AI class seems to go over a broader set of machine learning topics than the ML class. I'm guessing the AI class will cover it's topics in less detail.

      • Between work and other studying obligations (which my job depends on) ... I can't commit myself to that kind of structure.

        Why not try? There is NO DOWNSIDE to signing up. It's free!!! You can see if there's any way to make it work. You can see if even the light version would work, or in fact if the topic really interests you after you see what it involves. The videos are put up once a week and you watch them whenever.

        Why should you try? Because you will learn, and retain, much more if you are working

    • by Rakishi (759894)

      Having actually taken both of the classes in question at Stanford I'd disagree. They're useful but it's not god shoving knowledge into your head. If you can learn from a book (seriously learn, not half ass it) then just go with that.

      Plus, you can already get the machine learning class videos (and a few other ones):
      http://see.stanford.edu/see/courses.aspx [stanford.edu]

  • by slasher999 (513533) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @02:05AM (#37523754)

    I purchased a course from "The Great Courses" on DVD last year (thegreatcourses.com), the topic of which was Game Theory. I've enjoyed the first half of the course, but haven't completed it. Unfortunately whenever I get time to go back to it, it has been long enough that I tend to start back at the beginning and watch the entire course over.

    • These are awesome courses! Especially if you are new to the field. There are a couple of them that might interest you - the course on Game Theory, taught by a matemetician, focuses on the theory itself, although it gives some real life and historical scenarios of how game theory should be (or was) applied.

      Then there is a course on Conflict Resolution which discusses a lot of the themes from Game Theory applied to real life and another course on Leadership that discusses a lot of historical examples of failu

  • Read perceptrons, I'm sure a copy exists in your local college library.
    • don't kill me with -1 troll, it's a joke.
      • don't kill me with -1 troll, it's a joke.

        Slashdot should have a "just kidding" button, that will change your -5, troll to +5, funny.

        • by DanDD (1857066)

          But then some asshat named Marvin would point out, in the most malicious way, how there can be no guarantee of linear separation between joke and troll...

  • by Anonymous Coward

    After you go thru the usual stuff (Intro to AI, on-line courses, et al)
    Game Theory and Decision Theory in Agent-Based Systems ISBN 978-1-4020-7115-7
    Game Theory: Analysis of Conflict ISBN 978-0674341166
    Hope this helps.

  • Russell & Norvig (Score:5, Informative)

    by Black Parrot (19622) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @02:38AM (#37523904)

    Read Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, 3rd edition. It's supposedly the most-used AI textbook in the world.

    It's weak on the biologically inspired methods (genetic algorithms, neural networks, fuzzy logic), but very solid in "Good Old Fashioned AI" (GOFAI) and some of the decision-making procedures from other fields such as economics.

    If you don't have a background in CS, you'll need to work through a book on discrete math first.

    • +1 for this book. It was the only textbook in my uni study that I read cover to cover like a novel. It's exceptionally well written an accessible
  • I like the Yale course by Benjamin Polak so far. I've only seen the first four videos, but it is presented very accessibly. You can find the videos easily on google.
  • Central planning doesn't work nearly as well as decentralization of knowledge does.
    • by migla (1099771)

      Maybe I'm off on a tangent or somewhere completely different alltogether, but...

      How about decentralization of planning, too? If everyone that wanted to could be part of decision making. That would probably be the best and most democratic (obviously) way? In this age of the internet, it should not be that hard to implement technically, either.

      AFAICS, the only reason not to increase democracy to an extreme is the possibility that democracy really isn't good for people. And even if that were true, it must stil

      • "If everyone that wanted to could be part of decision making."

        The bigger problem is all the people that don't want to be involved in planning, but want to remain employed/in good graces/not drawn outside the lines. Solve the organizational problem of perceived proximity to satisfaction and you might have a stab at making this work. Unfortunately, it is all too easy to make a human believe that the distance between current position and satisfaction is variable according to externally controlled factors. The distance is always equal to the duration of the urge, no m

  • by Unoriginal_Nickname (1248894) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @02:49AM (#37523976)

    The best way to learn is to do it. Choose a "game" and try to solve it with some different approaches. I say "game" with quotes because the game you pick should definitely not be a game which a normal adult would choose to play, but something very young children would play, or a heavily simplified variant of a full game. Something like Tic-Tac-Toe or RPS.

    RPS seems trivial, but it's actually a very interesting game to study. It's an easy-to-understand example of how a Nash equilibrium strategy doesn't always produce an optimal outcome. The equilibrium strategy is to choose between the three moves at random, but you can't naively use the strategy because it offers no way of taking advantage of weak opponents, such as an opponent that favors a particular move or a pattern of moves. Computer RPS tournaments will always include a variety of bots that are predictably weak in various ways, to separate out the good bots that are capable of using these weaknesses.

    Another simple game you could experiment with is Leduc Poker. Leduc Poker is another matrix game, and it's simple enough that you can easily compute the Nash equilibrium (which, remember, is not necessarily optimal, but it's a good starting point) or iterate over the entire game tree. You could also use a similar subset of poker to experiment with more advanced techniques - e.g. minimax and alphabeta pruning, or maybe Monte Carlo Tree Search (I can't guarantee that MCTS would work for poker, I'm not sure it's ever been done, but it might be interesting to try.)

    • by Rockoon (1252108)
      In all likelihood, the OP doesnt actually want to learn AI but rather the related subject of Machine Learning.

      The problem with tackling AI is in fact everything you were talking about. Pick a simple game, write a player for it, etc, where the answer is nearly always some form of tree search leveraging hard-coded knowledge (chess-like) or simple Bayesian derivations using hard-coded knowledge (poker-like.) While that stuff (and path finding) is the mainstay of popularized AI, its both limiting and non-inte
  • by v(*_*)vvvv (233078) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @02:52AM (#37523984)

    Some think that artificial intelligence seeks to emulate the real intelligence of humans. But most of it is just software, and has little to do with real intelligence.

    There are certain problems that AI can solve, but those solutions are not "intelligent" but rather are merely "formulas" programmed by intelligent people (computer scientists).

    We get excited when these formulas emulate what a real person might do, and when we can hide the underlying machine, but that is not to say we know how people think or even how we are implemented. We are just getting better at programming.

    There are some great advancements in cognitive science, and the more we discover about how the brain works, the less it looks like it could be run by any "code". No intel inside. The brain is an organ that grows and dies, and takes its memories with it. If anything, it programs itself.

    That is not to say there haven't been advancements in AI. It too is incredibly useful.

    A good place to start:
    http://www.ted.com/search?q=brain [ted.com]
    http://www.ted.com/search?q=artificial+intelligence [ted.com] ... and wikipedia of course...

  • by meburke (736645) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @03:15AM (#37524088)

    Not to belittle your choices, but this is a VERY complicated subject. My favorite introductions to game theory are, "The Compleat Strategyst" by Williams, and, "Strategy in Poker, Business and War" by McDonald. These are not trivial books, but they are easy reads into the uses of Game Theory.

    After that, you get into some Math. Read anything you can on Probability and Risk; know your Statistics and Calculus. Much of what you are looking for will be found under the subject "Decision Theory."

    I say study Economics because this is where political and economic scientific thought is making the greatest gains at this time. Game theory has a lot to do with "payoff" and Economics is a fertile field for studying payoffs. (So is Political Science, and there some good laboratories in, say, Afghanistan, Mexico and Chicago. But that's a slightly different, pragmatic, field of study.)

    My favorite definition of "politics" is: "The behavior of vying for scarce rewards." This is almost exactly a definition for Economics. At one time Economics was thought to be a sub-level of politics; it now seems the opposite is true.

    Hayak pretty much proved that economic behavior cannot be quantified because of the complexity. What is useful is deriving principles of actions under a variety of conditions to provide maximum payoffs, for the most people, under the widest variety of conditions. (An alternative course is to try to derive the largest payoffs for the fewest people under specific conditions.) AutoDesk used to have an Artificial Life laboratory that you could manipulate to learn about Genetic Algorithms and other AI behavior. Context-dependent AI can be learned through developing Neural Nets. Some of the guys I've talked to at Carnegie Mellon in the Quantitative Economics studies have warring economic artificial hybrid GA/Neural Nets, and the observations are pretty interesting.

    If it was simply a matter of rational decision making, optimum economic strategies could probably be described and tested in a much smaller AI field. However, politics and economics are burdened with mis-perceptions, human values, and stubborn beliefs. This is a big field, and you should be able to enjoy it as a hobby for the rest of your life without running into a limit of learning.

    • by xmojox (2468846)
      I have and currently do study Economics which is what has started my interest into AI and GT. Now this ... > Carnegie Mellon in the Quantitative Economics studies have warring economic artificial hybrid GA/Neural Nets, and the observations are pretty interesting. Sounds very interesting to me and more to the point of my interest in the subjects.
    • by whyrat (936411)
      I'd recommend narrowing "economics" down to just of the sub-field of microeconomics; behavioral economics in particular. These focus on the actions of a single agent (or small number of agents). Wikipedia link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_economics [wikipedia.org] Most of macroeconomics looks at the systems that result out of a large number of agents acting independently, which isn't what I infer the OP is looking for (there's little overlap between AI and things like: theory of money; aggregate supply / dema
  • For AI, I would suggest enrolling into the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Course [ai-class.com]. It will start on October 10th this year and lasts until December (I think).

    • by Fnord666 (889225)
      OP

      "I would like to learn more about Artificial Intelligence and Game Theory. I know these are both large areas of study; however, my main interest is in how these affect decisions in the world. This would include politicians, business people, and general society. I'm not looking for a career or anything; this is just a personal interest of mine. Where are good places to start in these areas for somebody new to them? I'm aware of the Stanford on-line classes, but those don't work with my current schedule."

      Reply

      For AI, I would suggest enrolling into the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Course. It will start on October 10th this year and lasts until December (I think).

      Good old slashdot, where reading the question asked before answering is just too damn much trouble.

  • First, read up on Braitenburg Vehicles [wikipedia.org] and The Selfish Gene [wikipedia.org], by Richard Dawkins. Dawkins is something of a deity in the annals of evolutionary biology and is worthy of worship :-p

    Then read up on Neural Networks [wikipedia.org], start simple with a feed-forward with error backprop.

    Then try your hand at some Temporal Difference Learning [wikipedia.org].

    Then take a look at genetic algorithms [wikipedia.org], but it might help you to first understand the classic A* heuristic search algorithm [wikipedia.org]. Genetic algorithms tend to be interesting search algorithms that

    • by Rockoon (1252108)

      Genetic algorithms tend to be interesting search algorithms that are inspired by a genetic process, but they have little connection to the actual biological process for which they are named, so I am biased against them. This perception could just be a local cognitive minima that might be avoided with better training.

      Just stop using the name 'genetic algorithm' when thinking about them.

      Begin with a straightforward randomized state-space search method, simply remember the candidate solution with the best score. How can that be improved upon? We could keep a record of many of these randomized candidate solutions and their scores and derive new candidates using various methodologies, such as combining parts of two different candidates into a new candidate and then randomizing only minor parts of these new candidates. We

  • Not knowing exactly what level of knowledge you're starting from... One of my first game purchases was Patton Versus Rommel, which included some artificial smarts. The liner notes included a reference to his second book The Art of Computer Design [wikipedia.org], [PDF [google.com]] and based on the context, I hoped it might include at least introductory pointers to game AI. Nope. There's also Chris Crawford on Game Design [wikipedia.org], [Google Books [google.com]]. It does include some high level designs, which may or may not be what you're looking for.

  • Are available here [openculture.com].

    Happy studying.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    May I suggest the following book:

    Multiagent Systems
    Algorithmic, Game-Theoretic, and Logical Foundations
    Yoav Shoham
    Stanford University
    Kevin Leyton-Brown
    University of British Columbia

    http://www.masfoundations.org/index.html

  • by mrogers (85392) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @04:07AM (#37524264)
    The best technical introduction to game theory I've come across is Game Theory: A Critical Introduction by Shaun P. Hargreaves-Heap and Yanis Varoufakis, which introduces the most important concepts while placing them within their philosophical context (for example, to what extent is it reasonable to regard humans as the kind of agents assumed by game theory?). I've been studying game theory for years and wish I'd read this book a long time ago.

    If you really have no patience for philosophy, try Game Theory for Applied Economists by Robert Gibbons instead. ;-)

    John Maynard Smith's Evolution and the Theory of Games is accessible and indispensable.

    Less technical works that explore the implications of the theory in fascinating ways include The Evolution of Cooperation (the book that first got me interested in the subject) and The Complexity of Cooperation by Robert Axelrod, and anything by Brian Skyrms.

  • by tsvk (624784) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @04:09AM (#37524278)

    Here is the complete Youtube playlist for the Yale course "Game Theory", lectured by Ben Polak. 24 lectures in total, about 1 h 15 min each.

    Course description: This course is an introduction to game theory and strategic thinking. Ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, evolutionary stability, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signaling are discussed and applied to games played in class and to examples drawn from economics, politics, the movies, and elsewhere.

    I have had the intention of watching through this, but haven't had the time after the first few lectures. The material is recommended, though.

    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6EF60E1027E1A10B [youtube.com]

  • by tlambert (566799) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @04:11AM (#37524284)

    Good game theory books I keep on my shelf:

    Nonlinear Dynamics, Mathematical Biology, and Social Science (Santa Fe Institute Studies in the Sciences of Complexity Lecture Notes)
    by Joshua Epstein
    Westview Press
    ISBN: 9780201419887
    (if you know enough math for partial differential equations, this book is a must-have, since it's directly applicable to mathematically modelling open source software projects)

    The Evolution of Cooperation
    by Robert Axelrod and William D. Hamilton
    Paper: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.147.9644&rep=rep1&type=pdf [psu.edu]
    Book: ISBN 0-465-02122-2
    Perspectives on Adaptation in Natural and Artificial Systems
    Basic Books
    ISBN: 9780195162929

    The Complexity of Cooperation: Agent-Based Models of Competition and Collaboration
    by Robert Axelrod
    Princeton University Press
    ISBN 978-0691015675

    Game Theory and the Social Contract, Vol. 1: Playing Fair
    by Ken Binmore
    MIT Press
    ISBN 978-0262023634

    Game Theory and the Social Contract, Vol. 2: Just Playing (Economic Learning and Social Evolution)
    by Ken Binmore
    MIT Press
    ISBN 978-0262024440

    Analyzing Policy: Choices, Conflicts, and Practice
    by Michael C. Munger
    W. W. Norton & Company
    ISBN 978-0393973990

    Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science from the Bottom Up (Complex Adaptive Systems
    by Joshua M. Epstein, Robert L. Axtell
    MIT Press
    ISBN 978-0262550253

    See also:

    http://www.santafe.edu/ [santafe.edu]
    http://www.youtube.com/user/santafeinst [youtube.com]

    The Brookings Institute is also active in this area (it was their math that led most of the U.S. Cold War policy and kept everyone out of a nuclear exchange with the Soviets).

    -- Terry

  • MIT has tons of material on AI, on their OpenCourseWare [mit.edu] site, especially in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science [mit.edu] section.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'll get shot down in flames for this, but it's a geek fallacy to think that you can understand "politicians, business people, and general society" through "Artificial Intelligence and Game Theory".

    To understand politicians, study politics.

    To understand business people, study business.

    To understand society, study sociology.

    Of course, to understand Artificial Intelligence and Game Theory, then study Artificial Intelligence and Game Theory.

  • by srussia (884021) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @05:56AM (#37524620)
    Tank, I need a program for AI and Game Theory... Hurry!
  • "I would like to learn more about Artificial Intelligence and Game Theory. I know these are both large areas of study; however, my main interest is in how these affect decisions in the world. This would include politicians, business people, and general society. I'm not looking for a career or anything; this is just a personal interest of mine. Where are good places to start in these areas for somebody new to them? I'm aware of the Stanford on-line classes, but those don't work with my current schedule."

    D
  • Consciousness (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Smallpond (221300) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @08:45AM (#37525284) Homepage Journal

    I haven't seen anyone post it yet, but if your interest is in human-like intelligence, read an AI critic like Searle.

  • Game theory (Score:3, Informative)

    by rajats (891347) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @10:33AM (#37526350) Homepage
    Read Avinash Dixit's Thinking Strategically to get started. It's a great book which does not use much math and can make for light reading and a great start.
  • by peter303 (12292) on Tuesday September 27, 2011 @11:15AM (#37526812)
    M.I.T. had two 150th birthday conferences [mit.edu] on A.I. this year. This would give some ideas on the state of the art and the players. Its not a systematic, pedagogical presentation.
  • Actually I am only half kidding! I was interested in this myself recently and found that there is a Yale proff teaching game theory that puts his lectures on youtube. I sat through two lectures on Nash Equilibrium a few months back: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7oASpaBdDMs [youtube.com]

    Course it couldn't hurt to get a text book, but, it would be trivial to lookup the required books for these or other similar classes, and go buy them at any college book store. Just walk right in and buy them, or find them online.

    Is it t

  • Please note that "Game Theory", as a branch of mathematics, is not always about playing board or video games. Likewise, there is plenty of AI that has nothing to do with either games or game theory.

    The Compleat Strategyst [amazon.com] is an old but very good (not too mathematical) introduction to pure game theory.

    Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays [amazon.com] is a great series of books on the mathematics of games.

    For AI, see previous reco's. For my money you can't go wrong with Russel/Norvig, unless you are look

  • Its definitely a subset of AI, but if you are interested in Machine Learning then you should check out the Deep Learning Tutorials [deeplearning.net]. They cover most of the building blocks of "Deep Learning", which you can think of as the new wave of Artificial Neural Networks. The tutorials include complete theoretical (and mathematical) descriptions of the model, as well as Python/Theano implementations. Pre-requisites would be a good math background (first year calculus should suffice), basic probabili
  • "The Predictioneer's Game" by Bruce Bruno de Mesquita is an overview of the authors use of game theory and statistical predictions of behavior (for profit, no less). He has a Ph.D. in political science, covers a few historical situations and bangs out some predictions. It is not heavy on the math, but would take a few afternoons to plow through.
  • Sounds like you are interested in Multiagent Systems. I am current taking a graduate course in MAS theory at Waterloo. Here is the book we use; it's free online http://www.masfoundations.org/index.html [masfoundations.org]. It's an excellent book; the details and the high level ideas are broken apart nicely, such that if you want to go balls deep you can, but if you just wan't the high level ideas you can grab those too.
  • This is a hard-work. One of my friends is studing in this. But it is still a long way to learn .






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