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Ask Slashdot: Best Tools For Dealing With Glare Sensitivity? 195

Posted by timothy
from the dirty-looks-but-bright dept.
First time accepted submitter der_pinchy writes "For many years I have used a high-contrast desktop color scheme (with green text on black background) and notice more and more software uses a forced color scheme that can make it difficult to use. For web browsing I have always used Opera and its white-on-black user style sheet, but have to constantly tweak it so that certain elements and transparent images are visible. Is there anything to be done with some of the major offenders, like Office or recent versions of Visual Studio? Even recent browsers that support user style sheets still use a forced color scheme on a lot of there dialog controls."
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Ask Slashdot: Best Tools For Dealing With Glare Sensitivity?

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  • Would polarized sunglasses help here? They're generally pretty good at cutting down glare.

    But, maybe your doctor or optometrist would be better to ask?

    • No. I just tried with a pair on my screen. On this Dell LCD is seems to increase the distance between the text and the glass(plastic)? So whatever polarized coating they use in manufacture, gives all of the head ache and none of the 3D effect.

      HOWEVER! Just one lens is fine. So using two rights of lefts will be fine and is the best way to watch a 3D film.
      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        The best way?
        By that you mean just as dim and no 3D? That is a very odd definition of best.

        • by hawguy (1600213)

          The best way?
          By that you mean just as dim and no 3D? That is a very odd definition of best.

          Actually, that probably *is* the best way to watch most 3D films. Few 3D movies use 3D as more than a gimmick.

          • by h4rr4r (612664)

            So far I have enjoyed Priest, Hobbit and Prometheus. 3D seems about as much a gimmick as color. The big thing I found I had to do was resist the urge to look at what the camera was not focused on. Hopefully one day eye tracking and lytro type cameras make even that possible.

            • by pepty (1976012)

              The big thing I found I had to do was resist the urge to look at what the camera was not focused on. Hopefully one day eye tracking and lytro type cameras make even that possible.

              I don't think they need lytro type cameras or eye tracking. Directors have been using shallow depths of field to guide the eye and compose the frame for over a hundred years. The problem now is making them choose: selective focus OR 3D. No, not both. No jumping back and forth between selective focus and 3D either. Choose one or the other and get on with the show. To me the big problem is the focus/convergence distance difference. When they can do that (giant heads up display?) it will stop being a gimmick.

        • by sjames (1099)

          At least no headache. If you can't get it in 2D, that may be the best you can hope for.

          • by h4rr4r (612664)

            Stop focusing on stuff that is out of focus.
            That is your problem. It was mine as well. You need to keep your focus only the items in focus and not attempt to force the background into focus.

      • by pipatron (966506)

        No one is talking about 3D film here, and the OP talks about polarized sunglasses, not 3D glasses.

        • And what do you think the technology behind 3D glasses is? Hint: polarization
          • by Lumpy (12016)

            Poalized dont do anything for glare except on water from direct sunlight.

            you need anti glare coatings. And yes It's called going to the eye doctor or turn off the overhead lights.

            • by PNutts (199112) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @02:25PM (#42619297)

              Poalized dont do anything for glare except on water from direct sunlight.

              Polarized glasses eliminate any light not in the proper orientation, regardless of its source. In the example of sunglasses, besides water it also reduces glare from the streets themselves, metal (manhole covers), etc.

              • by Lumpy (12016)

                and are 100% useless in computer use.

              • by Asmor (775910)

                The really crazy thing about polarized sunglasses is that you can actually see the difference they make by tilting your head. I often find myself looking down at the street as I'm walking around Boston rolling my head back and forth, amused by how different it looks at different angles, and then belatedly realize I probably look like a loony.

          • by hawguy (1600213)

            And what do you think the technology behind 3D glasses is? Hint: polarization

            Or red/blue color blocking, or LCD shutters. (which I guess technically rely on polarization, but that's not how they get the 3D effect - mechanical shutters would work just as well).

            • Nobody uses the red/blue or color blocking anymore, that is ancient technology now. And LCD shutters use polarization.
          • by AaronLS (1804210)

            This is like saying all black birds are crows.

            1) Some 3D glasses use polarization to achieve this, but lots of sunglasses are polarized and have nothing to do with 3D.
            2) In fact polarized sunglasses usually have both lenses oriented in the same direction, instead of being orthoganal, and as such would not work with a 3D display.
            3) Even if you were using glasses poloarized for 3D, the discussion at hand still has nothing to do with 3D because the OP seemed to imply he's talking about a regular display. Afte

            • All I stated was the technology behind 3D glasses is polarization. I didn't claim polarized sunglasses are the same as 3D glasses anywhere. I wasn't trying to imply anything beyond the fact that most 3D glasses use polarization. Anything else is inference by others, not what was stated.
          • 3D glasses are cross polarized - one lens is vertical, the other horizontal. Sunglasses have both lenses vertically polarized.
      • by hawguy (1600213) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @01:13PM (#42618523)

        No. I just tried with a pair on my screen. On this Dell LCD is seems to increase the distance between the text and the glass(plastic)? So whatever polarized coating they use in manufacture, gives all of the head ache and none of the 3D effect.

        HOWEVER! Just one lens is fine. So using two rights of lefts will be fine and is the best way to watch a 3D film.

        Turn your screen 90 degrees and the polarized glasses should take care of 100% of the glare. On most LCD screens, it will make the image go completely black.

        Which is always amusing when places use a monitor turned 90% as an information display - one bright sunny day we walked into a fast food restaurant and my wife asked me what I was going to order, while she pointed to the blank screens. I couldn't figure out how she was reading the menu until I remembered to take off my sunglasses.

        What I don't know is whether monitor makers purposely chose a polarization direction that works well with glare reducing polarized sunglasses, or if it's just coincidence that the best polarization direction for a monitor also happens to be compatible with sunglasses.

        • by Macgrrl (762836)

          I tend to have this problem at the local train station I use to exit the city in the evenings, the platform boards at the station entry are portrait orientated LCD screens. I have to remember to remove my sunglasses as I approach so I can read them as I get rushed past them in a hurry by the stream of people.

    • by Dr_Barnowl (709838) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:37PM (#42618103)

      No.

      Polarized sunglasses cut glare because reflected light tends to be polarized in one direction. Therefore you can selectively block it out.

      Alas, modern flat panel displays all use polarized filters to work. So they don't work too well with polarized glasses.

  • LED Screens (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:24PM (#42617965)

    Black on white on LED screens gives me major migraines. When will they understand computer screens are not like ink on paper.

    • by Patch86 (1465427)

      Never, I think. I have a Kindle Fire, and was astonished to find that the default colour scheme for reading books was black-text-on-white. It can be changed to white-on-black, but I just can't fathom why anyone would choose the default option if they knew to change it. Surely Amazon employ UI designers?

      • by swanzilla (1458281) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:49PM (#42618257) Homepage

        Surely Amazon employ UI designers?

        They do, and don't call Amazon Shirley.

      • by cellocgw (617879)

        Well, I can't fathom why you think the only color option is binary: #FFFFFF vs #000000 . At least with the tablets chez moi (one iPad, one Onda Android), it's easy to adjust the page background in book-reading apps (Nook, Mantano, etc) to some other color. I find a light parchment, with, yes, black text, to be very comfortable.

        • by Macgrrl (762836)

          Back in the dim dark past when I used to do website UI stuff (TM), I used to set my backgrounds at something approaching 5% grey and the text at something like 95% grey because it was much easier on the eyes to read, but still afforded ample contrast. Don't ask me to remember the RGB settings, it's been too long.

        • Well, Amazon Kindle has unfortunately pre-made three choices for you:

          1. (Default) Black on light gray. Not great but OK.

          2. White on black. And that is hard black on true white. High contrast nightmare.

          3. Sepia: some sort of grayish on some sort of yellowish. Low contrast nightmare.

          White on black and sepia lay essentially on extremes of the contrast range, leaving as useful only the #1. Without a jail-break, there is no way to create the popular for backlit screens "Light gray on black" color scheme. An

      • If it's an OLED display, black backgrounds save on battery...

      • Re:LED Screens (Score:4, Informative)

        by Spectre (1685) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @01:45PM (#42618885)

        Most fonts appear to have smoother edges and more consistent curves when rendered as black-text-on-white background, which is why that is the default ...

        • Most fonts appear to have smoother edges and more consistent curves when rendered as black-text-on-white background, which is why that is the default ...

          Er, what?

          The web colour scheme was around since well before anti-aliasing was common. And has been annoying all that time. If it was easier to read, why would most sysadmins have green-on-black coloured xterms?

          I did once compile xdark [fastmail.fm], and you can invoke "xdark 1 0" to reverse video the entire screen, but I never got into the habit of using it regularly.

      • Because it looks more like a book this way?

    • We have some terminal Apps at work. I have mine with a black background... You will be surprised how many complain about that black background color, saying how hard it is to see. I expect most of the bitching and moaning isn't that it is harder to see, but what they are use too.

      • by Endlisnis (208453)
        I grew up with white-on-black DOS screens. In my recent jobs, I spend a lot of time using command-line terminal windows. For years, I used white-on-black. But, stating about 2 years ago, I switched to black-on-white. I found an immediate relief. It is much easier to stare at and less tiring when viewed for long durations. Maybe there's no biological preference, but I'll let you know that, for me, it's not just about what I'm used to. Black-on-white is easier for me.
      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        We have some terminal Apps at work. I have mine with a black background... You will be surprised how many complain about that black background color, saying how hard it is to see. I expect most of the bitching and moaning isn't that it is harder to see, but what they are use too.

        There is a legitimacy to that - white-on-black generally causes the black to "creep" into the white font, so a designer who uses the color scheme generally has to increase the font size and/or bold it so it retains the same apparent

    • by xaxa (988988)

      I realised a few years ago I didn't like the bright, white glare of a screen in the evening (or at night).

      I installed Redshift [jonls.dk] (check the repository before installing it manually), and now my screen fades to a warmer palette gradually, as the day progresses. The colour temperature changes to match the outside light. The first time I enabled it at night and the screen changed I could feel my eyes relaxing.

      Another option is to leave everything as black-on-white, then invert the screen. KDE has a graphics ef

  • by Bovius (1243040) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:27PM (#42617993)

    I'm used to interpreting "glare sensitivity" to meaning the screen is generally too bright for your eyes, but the subsequent comments about needing to use high contrast color palettes has me thinking maybe you mean something else.

    Anyway: I stare at a monitor all day, and for quite a while I had some serious dry eye problems because of it. Then about a year ago I bought some Gunnar glasses ( http://www.gunnars.com/ [gunnars.com] ) and my eyes got happier within 24 hours. Wear them all the time now.

    Full disclosure: I'm not even kind of affiliated with Gunnar. I just wear their glasses and I like them.

    • by Redlazer (786403)
      I was going to suggest something along those lines.

      When I was in college, we had fluorescent lights and super bright LED screens. The intensity was a little much for me, so I wore my sunglasses all the time.

      I'd recommend any glasses that are Polarized - that's what's making the Gunnar glasses work in this scenario, although the Gunnar glasses aren't darkened, which could be nice.

    • by Lumpy (12016)

      Buy cheap glasses from anywhere with a 10% yellow tint and anti glare coatings and get the same thing as "gunnar" glasses for about $29.00 shipped.

      That is all they are. Although I prefer the 10% grey as it increases contrast and does not color my world.

      • by PNutts (199112)

        I was thinking the same thing - yellow plastic glasses. The website is mostly videos with breathless explainations, disbelieving headshaking at what they've discovered, and questionable claims. The lenses are made from DIAMIX which apparently has no definition outside of their website. Personally I'm disappointed they aren't made of Diamondium.

        • I was thinking the same thing - yellow plastic glasses.

          My first thought was: yellow filter. The effect of the yellow filter is well known from the times of B&W photography: boost contrast, darken the (blue) skies (so that they do not white out completely). In color or with DSLRs, the same effect is achieved by adjusting white balance settings in the direction of amber: it gives the picture warmer colors.

          Some people have mentioned above the Redshift. I personally use on my PC the f.lux and it appears that both programs have almost the same effect as the ye

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You do realize that all those speciality glasses are doing is what you should be doing anyways, right?
      Calibrate your monitor to ~6500K and the need for yellow tint glasses goes away. Modern monitors come from the factory over 10000K which is AWFUL.
      Added blue makes whites look 'whiter' and brighter, so they keep turninig up the blue.

    • No scientific method (Score:4, Informative)

      by dutchwhizzman (817898) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @02:03PM (#42619031)

      I looked at the Gunnar Web site and saw no scientific backing of any of their claims. In my opinion, any improvement you'll get from these is 100% due to a placebo effect.

      specifically tuned focusing power - It's your eyes that do the focussing. Air does not distort focussing unless it's extremely hot.

      DIAMIX lens material is optically pure. - So is air. Actually, air is probably more optically pure than DIAMIX.

      IONIK lens tints improve overall contrast and comfort by filtering out harsh artificial light, eliminating UV rays and reducing high-intensity visible light. - So does your eye. You have an iris, lens and your brain automatically corrects for white balance. If your work place behind a computer screen puts you in dangerous UV light, you really need to look at your TFT, since those don't emit UV at all.

      iFi lens coatings include an anti-reflective layers to reduce glare - If there was no lens in the glasses, they wouldn't have to put anti-reflective layers on it. The only reflection those layers partially prevent is the reflection on the glasses themselves.

      TL;DR Snake oil glasses, you've been conned.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        I think they are just yellow tinted glasses. I needed some glasses for twilight bike riding in the rain (to protect my eyes from rain at speed), and the store I went to had both clear and yellow tinted, so I thought I'd try the yellow tinted. To my surprise, I discovered they helped a little with driving at night: my eyes didn't get as dry, and my endurance and night driving agitation was reduced. Maybe it's placebo, but it was only a mistake that I wore them (I put them on because snow and forgot them on,

        • I've been using yellow glasses for driving at night and in fog, heavy rain etc. They reduce the glare from headlights, and in rain/fog they seem to increase visibility.

          I suspect that this is because (as with sunglasses) they filter out some of the light, reducing the dynamic range your eyes have to deal with, so you end up with less eyestrain.

      • by Bovius (1243040)

        Maybe. I don't have any data to refute your claims.

        That being said, it's been a long time since I tried to hold a company's marketing material up against the piercing scrutiny of science. I also don't expect most companies to describe in reproducible detail the process they go through to produce their products, or the detailed results of any internal comparison studies they performed. Not for consumer products, anyway.

        It may be a placebo, but it's the most effective placebo I've ever had.

      • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

        You have to learn how to read marketoid speak, then it all makes sense.

        specifically tuned focusing power

        "Low power reading glasses"

        DIAMIX lens material is optically pure.

        "Transparent lenses"

        IONIK lens tints improve overall contrast and comfort by filtering out harsh artificial light, eliminating UV rays and reducing high-intensity visible light.

        iFi lens coatings include an anti-reflective layers to reduce glare

        "Polarized tinted sunglasses"

      • I looked at the Gunnar Web site and saw no scientific backing of any of their claims. In my opinion, any improvement you'll get from these is 100% due to a placebo effect.

        [... skip ...]

        TL;DR Snake oil glasses, you've been conned.

        Google for "photography yellow filter". References are scarce, because the filters were used in B&W photography, in pre-Internet times. But there are some.

        Alternatively google for "white balance amber" or ask on DSLR forums/check DSLR books about the shit to amber. Or if you have a DSLR, you can even experiment with it yourself: shoot a RAW and in any RAW development tool, play with the blue-yellow gauge in the white balance.

        All in all, as few commented above, those are simply well made yellow glass

    • by Macgrrl (762836)

      Another option is to look at the brightness settings on your monitor. Most are adjustable. Firstly consider using a lower (warmer) colour temperature, or alternately just adjusting the brightness down and potentially the contrast slightly. This may alleviate the symptoms without needing to mess around with software configurations.

      That said, if you are routinely suffering from glare based headaches, you probably need an eye exam and something like transition lenses.

  • OS? (Score:5, Informative)

    by lazarus (2879) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:27PM (#42617995) Journal

    You didn't say what version of Windows you were running, so it's tough to tell what might be available to you from an accessibility standpoint. On the Mac you can invert colours, use greyscale, and alter the contrast of the screen as well as cursor size (in addition to the typical colour schemes, display brightness, etc). It sounds to me like you may be facing an uphill battle if you are trying to do this outside of what the OS supports directly.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:29PM (#42618013)

    I've got a similar problem. I've taken to filing bugs with every vendor when I encounter a forced color scheme that dishonors system settings. Fat client apps are very likely to get fixed.

    Visual Studio fixes itself if you turn on high-contrast and then load your color scheme on top of it. In Windows 7, saving your color scheme with high contrast enabled saved high contrast enabled to the color scheme. In Windows 8, high contrast is always on when the color scheme is not the default.

    Unfortunately, websites tend to not fix their bugs. I get too many "it's a browser bug", and one that was equivalent to "use a screen reader" even after I offered to fix their bug for them.

    I suppose you could hack up a 1 bit display driver that only sends green to the monitor, or perhaps with a remote desktop client that does (incoming) -> (gresyscale) -> (green) -> (inverted green).

  • Simple (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Invert the colors in X11 itself: xcalib -i -a

    • Invert the colors in X11 itself: xcalib -i -a

      What would that do to a Wine session, or to a VM running Windows on a Linux host?
      If it does what I think (Linux-only here, no VM or Wine), there could be confusing issues in figuring out palettes afterwards in the VM or in a Wine session. The OP mentioned using Office and Visual Studio, so it's likely to be a Windows user.

  • bias lighting (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:33PM (#42618047)

    If black on white text is too bright then you probably need more light in the room. Your eyes adjust to the overall scene brightness, so if you have a bright screen in the middle of a dark field, because the lights are out in the room, then the screen will appear too bright and fatiguing. Try installing some LEDs on the back of your monitor to illuminate the wall behind the screen. That will increase the overall scene brightness and make the screen seem less harsh without creating reflections on the screen.

    • Try installing some LEDs on the back of your monitor to illuminate the wall behind the screen.

      Or, if you prefer more moderate or darker ambient lighting, you can simply turn down the brightness of your monitor. I normally keep mine between 10% and 25% of full brightness, and usually adjust the contrast a bit as well.

      For what it's worth, I found this solution by mistake many years ago. I had set my laptop to always use its dimmest setting. It was a power saving feature, meant for use when powered by battery only. Having the screen always dim, I got very used to it that way. I wondered why othe

      • by ergean (582285)

        It's not the brightness, it's the contrast. I can't see shit in low light... I had myopia now after a had crystalline implants I see almost 20/20 at almost any range except in the 0-50cm proximity in low light. I could read at the light of the stars with myopia, now I can't read shit... but I can see the writing. I found that if I have more light (contrast) I can almost read anything a normal person can read.

  • by oneiros27 (46144) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @12:34PM (#42618053) Homepage

    If it's MacOS X, go into the 'Universal Access' control panel, and there's a 'contrast' slider, and you can force greyscale, black on white, or white on black.

    Most X windows managers have ways to do similar things, although in some you have to mess with configuration files.

    No idea how to do it in Amiga or Haiku, though.

  • I have thinking about how to solve the issue programmatically. That is, once and for all. There are a few rules which could be forced upon the window server. Compiz for example has some potential in this direction, so it could be refined.

    - When luminance per area exceed a user-set property, invert luminance but keep chroma. Perhaps something ImageMagick or similar could do with ease.

    - Be aware of common image formats and be reasonably sure that everything else is typeface. With emerging VR we might have to

  • Perhaps you need someone trained to alternative explanations?

    After all, several of the available color schemes were adapted using people trained in adapting color schemes. Maybe someone trained may help you.

  • For the major offender of VS 2012, type 'color theme ' into Quick Launch and select Environment - General. Then change the Color theme to Dark.
    For Office 2013 go to the General options and change the Office Theme to Dark Gray.
  • They can be applied to any window w/ a key combo, and are fairly customisable.
    Here's a custom one applied to Firefox, is one that preserves colours while inverting lightness.

    http://m8y.org/tmp/biased-inverted-lightness.txt [m8y.org]
    http://m8y.org/tmp/inverted-lightness.txt [m8y.org]

    http://m8y.org/tmp/lightness1.jpeg [m8y.org] http://m8y.org/tmp/lightness2.jpeg [m8y.org] http://m8y.org/tmp/lightness3.jpeg [m8y.org]

    Arbitrary tweaks of the values. Apologies for the relative unreadableness of the script (variable reuse, bad names) was just a quick implementati

  • by TheCarp (96830) <sjc@nospAm.carpanet.net> on Thursday January 17, 2013 @01:25PM (#42618639) Homepage

    Ever since my apple ][ days, when I had a color monitor, I knew I liked dark backgrounds and light text. At the time, red on black. Now I am happy with a light gray on black

    Setting this on terminals is cake. Even putty can be made reasonable quickly.

    However... they are the exception. Nearly everything I use regularly really works. Few support changing color schemes at all, and the ones that do, are so limited as to be useless. Pidgin and eclipse both come to mind as having mechanisms (with pidgin I believe its via plugins) to change color schemes, but only in very limited ways. You can't, change the look of many of the utility window parts, like the resources view....so the darker you make the rest, the more jarring those stand outs become.... often making it less appealing than reverting to defaults.

    Of course, I have a north facing window that overlooks an old barn that the neighbors put white siding on, so the glare from that can be prodigeous during the day. Room darkening shades, preferably with wooden slats take care of that nicely.

    I also highly recomend a light behind the monitor. I stuck an old lamp back there, but have some LEDs that I used to put an RGB LED version in with.... I just need to mess with the controller a bit more.

  • by bananaquackmoo (1204116) on Thursday January 17, 2013 @01:28PM (#42618673)
    BUY A DIFFERENT MONITOR

    No seriously. There are MANY monitor technologies, and some deal better with glare than others. Matte displays, IPS, high DPI, different backlighting technologies, etc

    OR BUY A SHADE (or adjust your external lights):

    Adjust your lighting sources or block them out with a shade. You can buy these box-like things that go around monitors to shade the display by blocking lights. That will cut down on glare entirely since there is no external light to cause it.

    IF THESE DON"T WORK:

    Then you're not talking about glare.
  • So you don't like Black on White but want the background be black?
    In KDE I can make all windows or only one selected window inverse the colors.
    White will become black and black will become white (and green is red and vice versa)
    I tried it for the night when the laptop screen will get too bright.

  • If this is higher contrast for accessibility issues, while there are OS contrast settings, they will generally not correct for bad accessibility design in web sites themselves. This is a web site design issue.

    If a government site, or a site for a government contractor, has accessibility issues, you can force them to fix them via the ADA (American's with Disabilities Act). If it's some other site, and your OS accessibility settings won't handle it, then you need to contact the site maintainers and explain

  • I use dark themes in Visual Studio and it was pretty easy to set up. Take a look here [stackoverflow.com] or here [microsoft.com]. This [asp.net] is what I use.

    Google is your friend, too.
  • Rather offtopic, but does anyone else have glare sensitivity issues with these new led tail-lights? Most of them are OK, but some of them are almost blinding at night. I'm almost to the point of going full on Corey Hart after half an hour of stop-and-go behind the things.

    "I wear my sunglasses at night, so I can, so I can stand to watch these led tail-lights on certain awful cars.

    And yes, I'm a big fan of green on black, fortunately most editors can still be configured that way.
  • For me, the best solution has been to just make sure I'm operating in a well-lit room. Doesn't have to be full on halogen lights or anything, but a simple stand lamp somewhere behind you is great. Just turn the brightness down a bit on your monitor, if needed, and that should do it.

    What I can't do anymore is use darker color schemes like green text on black, especially in a dark room. It's fine sometimes, but the moment you open google or something, the contrast is too much.

  • (1) wear a basball cap down over your eyebrows.

    (2) stand on the desk and take out all but one fluorescent light tube,.

    (3) see the eye doctor, and get tested fully for cataracts. operate if necessary.

    I have had to follow those steps in that order. if you can't see the road with oncoming traffic at night, make that eye appointment today.

  • Be a clod, they're well known for their insensitivity.
  • Illuminated keyboard, darkened room, reduced monitor brightness, helps me and I wear fitovers in density 3 outside.

  • xcalib -a -i

  • I spend way more time on the internet than I should, but find the matte WUXGA display on my T61 very comfortable to use.

  • Dude. They go dark whenever an auditor or third party software salesman walks in.

  • I had a similar problem. And then I had my cataracts fixed.

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