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Firefox Programming

Ask Slashdot: Do Most Programmers Understand the English Language? 330

Posted by Soulskill
from the only-if-they've-called-the-right-libraries dept.
Shadoefax writes "I have been developing Firefox add-ons for several years and all so far submitted to AMO have been translated (localized) into several different languages. My latest add-on is geared more to the web developer as opposed to the average web browsing user. (It is a utility for examining JavaScript Objects and their methods and properties.) By my reckoning, I believe JavaScript, HTML, CSS and the DOM are all pretty much designed to be easily understood by English language readers. My question is this: Can I assume that most programmers understand the English language well enough that I may forego localizing the UI? While this will save time, effort and bloat, it may also restrict the usage of (what I hope) is a useful tool for developers."
Reader Cenan provides an interesting response from the perspective of a developer for whom English is not a first language:

"I am a developer, and happen to speak english as a second language. As much as I find it's helpful to my users to have the program's text information presented to the user in their native tongue, I really hate it if the tools I use speak to me in my native language.

Some vital parts of exceptions tend to get mangled when being translated, and you can't search for relevant information regarding whatever obscure failure you're experiencing unless you translate it back. And Google Translate doesn't do very well with technical terms.

It is especially unhelpful when the exception has been re-thrown from somewhere deep down, and is being presented with some parts translated, some parts not (I'm looking at YOU Microsoft; "Was this exception text helpful to you?" ( ) No ( ) No (x) Hell No!)"


Reader tlambert recommends such a tool only if it doesn't have end-user exposure:

Google translate will do the job well enough for non-English speakers, and almost every programmer is an English speaker in any case - or used to Google translations of CS technical papers, in any case.

If there's actually UI being exposed to an end user rather than a program, then of course there should be some way to localize the end user exposed content, although you should expect that most users won't end up using it, and will opt for English instead, unless it's for data input for text data for storage and retrieval.

For better or for worse, the primary language for IT is English. I generally think it's for the better, since there are concepts that the English language is better suited to representing, either natively, or with coined words/terms/phrases and/or "borrow words". For the last, French is probably the worst language, since they have "language police" whose sole reason for existing is to prevent "borrow words" entering the French language and "contaminating" it. The next most comparable language for "purity" is Japanese, which was represented by Matsumata Ohta when he attempted to prevent the C-J-K unification of the Unicode standard, and eventually got his way by pushing another Unicode code page so that you could, for example, grep -v the Chinese text out of a Chinese textbook on Japanese poetry. Double the storage size for a wchar_t, just so that they could keep the languages distinct in both encoding and rendering, rather than just in rendering.


Reader dejanc responds with an analogy:

"Being a programmer and not understanding English is like being a historian writing papers on the Roman Empire and not knowing Latin. There is a lot of programmers out there who don't understand English or are not comfortable with it, but as a rule, they are not that good.

You have to learn our profession somehow. Yeah, you can learn C or Java from a book written in your native language, but most APIs out there are documented only in English. If you don't speak English, then your resources are severely limited.

That being said, if you can do localization, do it. Localization is usually very easy and doesn't require much bloat. You can have volunteers do the actual translation, you just need to get the strings ready, so it shouldn't be more than a couple of hours of your time.

Some talented programmers are just not talented for learning languages, or prefer to have UI in their own language. They are the ones who Google Translate documentation online, so you'll be doing them a favor."
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Ask Slashdot: Do Most Programmers Understand the English Language?

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  • by cait56 (677299) * on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:24PM (#42834133) Homepage
    All of the protocols that web programming depend upon are published in English. So presuming the ability to read written English is reasonable.
    If you collaborating with non-native English speakers, although, you should be careful to not assume that the ability to read or even write English guarantees that they will be comfortable discussing ideas orally in English.
    • by vidnet (580068) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:44PM (#42834401) Homepage

      You're assuming that the majority of web programmer reads RFCs and the HTML5 spec.

      It's not unreasonable to think some people in less anglocentric parts just know tag names as character sequences rather than words (and science backs up the fact that arbitrary character strings works as commands when you're used to them).

      Even if they do know the meanings of every word used in HTML/CSS markup, they still might have no idea how to conjugate "to be", much less read english prose.

      • by MisterBuggie (924728) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:50PM (#42834497)

        As a French speaker, I can guarantee that most programmers here understand little more than the basic programming terms.

        Most of the specs have been translated into French, so that's not a problem.

        • by hedwards (940851)

          And that works out fine as long as you don't need the ones that aren't and aren't worried about what gets lost in translation.

          And as long as you don't care about being limited to mostly just French speaking programmers.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by cayenne8 (626475)
            I dunno about the programmers.

            But as far as the 'support' people...no, the majority are NOT English speakers, even if they do claim their name is "Kevin".

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by AchilleTalon (540925)
            Neverless, you should always show respect to non-English speaking people and not be condescendant toward them like a comment in the body of the original post where a guy says programmers who do not speak English are not that good. Wow! What a asshole! I always appreciate a GUI and messages translated in my mother tongue when available and I consider this should be encouraged as much as possible. It's not that difficult to show respect to others.
            • by idontgno (624372) on Friday February 08, 2013 @02:49PM (#42835381) Journal

              But it doesn't change the fundamental reality: if you can't read the documentation, you've already put a limit on how effective you are.

              It's not your fault. I get it. Internationalization needs to be more prevalent. English-centric technical and implementation biases probably need to be fixed.

              Nonetheless. These are the facts, here and now. The majority of the Internet, and the majority of the cosmos of software, is implemented in English. Adapt, or be less effective until the world catches up to you.

            • by jgrahn (181062)

              I always appreciate a GUI and messages translated in my mother tongue when available and I consider this should be encouraged as much as possible. It's not that difficult to show respect to others.

              Are you seriously saying everyone should translate everything to every language, that it's *easy* to do so, and that you're *disrespectful* if you don't?

        • by xs650 (741277) on Friday February 08, 2013 @03:52PM (#42836229)

          As a French speaker, I can guarantee that most programmers here understand little more than the basic programming terms.

          As an English speaker, I have observed the same thing here.

        • by Dogtanian (588974) on Friday February 08, 2013 @03:54PM (#42836243) Homepage

          As a French speaker, I can guarantee that most programmers here understand little more than the basic programming terms. Most of the specs have been translated into French, so that's not a problem.

          Vincent: And you know what they call a ClassCastException in France?
          Jules: They don't call it a ClassCastException?
          Vincent: No man, they got the socialist system. They wouldn't know what the f*** a "class" is.
          Jules: Then what do they call it?
          Vincent: They call it a RoyaleWithCheeseException.
          Jules: A RoyaleWithCheeseException. What do they call a NullPointerException?
          Vincent: Well, a NullPointerException's a NullPointerException, but they call it un NullPointerException.
          Jules: Un NullPointerException. Ha ha ha ha. What do they call the spaceship operator?
          Vincent: I dunno, I didn't do any Perl programming over there.

          • by zzyzyx (1382375)

            Vincent: Well, a NullPointerException's a NullPointerException, but they call it un NullPointerException.

            Actually, exception is feminine, so we say "une NullPointerException" ;-)

        • by jean-guy69 (445459) on Friday February 08, 2013 @05:41PM (#42837595)
          As a french speaker I am ashamed at the poor level of english reading level of most people in IT, even after five years in college..
          A true IT professional should be able to read technical documents in English, which is the de facto standard language for CS ..
          One complaining about not being able to read English, needs to be told he'll be doing a great favor to himself by improving his english level.
          • by Erikderzweite (1146485) on Friday February 08, 2013 @06:45PM (#42838307)

            This is interesting... I've studied in Germany and not only were most of CS students pretty fluent in English there, one of the first thing we were told at the University was "English is not a foreign language for a programmer or CS student".

            Good English knowledge is also a requirement at many companies as they often work with foreign colleagues, partners or customers in one form or another. And that is more or less the rule as German economy is very export-oriented (and English is de-facto lingua franca nowadays).

      • It's probably worth, if nothing else, considering it as a matter of good practice.

        The submitter is under no obligation to provide multiple localizations(which can be an arduous and nontrivial task, combining the thrill of tech writing with the skills of a translator); but building an application such that somebody providing a localization for it involves major surgery is pretty...retro.

      • by Samantha Wright (1324923) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:59PM (#42834645) Homepage Journal

        I've heard anecdotes [c2.com] that speakers of some languages (e.g. French) actually prefer programming languages written in English, because (a) the more regular grammar results in more predictable/compact function/keyword names, and (b) more transparent syntax... or at least a foreign language that abstracts away all of the questions about how to decline the verb in a function name.

        For many languages, something as obtuse as Perligata [monash.edu.au] would be required to generate a coherent mapping to their native tongue; with English, native speakers simply accept the broken grammar and move on, and non-native speakers just treat the grammar as a black box, like an English speaker regards the Italian terms embedded in music notation.

        • the more regular grammar results in more predictable/compact function/keyword names

          I wouldn't describe English grammar as more "regular" than French. Maybe more flexible, put it in flattering terms.

          • by Samantha Wright (1324923) on Friday February 08, 2013 @06:57PM (#42838491) Homepage Journal

            From the perspective of someone coming up with programming language keywords, they most certainly are. Not in syntax necessarily, but definitely in declension: the verb forms in particular are much simpler.

            For example, in particular, the imperative and infinitive are identical. In English, "is file open" and "open file" use the same word for "open". In French you'd use "ouvert" for the first case and "ouvre" for the second, from the infinitive "ouvrir". And these endings aren't consistent across verbs—only very rarely do you see irregular English verbs in code; "to be" almost always appears as "is". Having to use separate keywords for function names (actions) and properties (predicative clauses and adjectives) puts a substantial cognitive load on the programmer.

      • by russotto (537200)

        (and science backs up the fact that arbitrary character strings works as commands when you're used to them)

        And when you say "science", you mean the long-running Bell Labs experiment called Unix, right?

    • by e70838 (976799) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:47PM (#42834461)
      I fully second this. When I was 18, I was reading complex technical documentation in english but was completely unable to have an oral discussion, even writing english was very difficult. Now, I work regularly with foreign people (in english). I still find discussing ideas in english a lot more painful than in my native language.

      Concerning translation of development tools, I prefer to have the tools in english, but I know people who really prefer to have them in their native language.
    • English is the main language of commerce.
      Those who speak their local language and no English tend (The word tend means the masses lean in that way, their are exceptions a lot of them) to be rather uneducated. Now these people are not necessarily going to be using programming tools too often.

      That isn't to say if you make your program for that language as well they wouldn't like it better as it is using the language they are more familiar with but I doubt you will see a big shift in usage.

    • What I don't understand is why the date and time formatting controls are a subset of the language controls, or why the time zone is listed as region/city rather than by the time zone name. My time zone is Eastern Standard Time, not America/NewYork. What do any of these settings have to do with language?
  • by mark-t (151149)

    Or perhaps more accurately, no, or at least not fluently.

    You might be able to presume that a majority of programmers have encountered english before, and may have a very basic understanding of it. But that's a far cry from having a practical and functional understanding of it.

  • by whizbang77045 (1342005) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:28PM (#42834173)
    IMHO, after trying to manage a number of software projects in the 70's, 80's and 90's, no.
  • but I usually ignore whatever is not in english language. I always tell people that it doesn't make sense to write papers (or software) in polish language because only a minuscule part of world population uses it.
    • Re:call me selfish (Score:5, Informative)

      by camperdave (969942) on Friday February 08, 2013 @03:23PM (#42835783) Journal

      I always tell people that it doesn't make sense to write papers (or software) in polish language because only a minuscule part of world population uses it.

      Obviously things should be written in Reverse Polish

  • by SpaghettiPattern (609814) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:32PM (#42834217)
    I speak very good English. I learned it from a man page.
    Credits partly to John Cleese.
    • I speak very good English. I learned it from a man page.

      If you're a foreigner, chance are that you no speak English very well [youtube.com] anyway!

  • If you're dealing with developers with a formal college education, they have a pretty high chance of understanding English. I just gave an English talk to developers in China Runtime CPU Performance Spike Detection Using Manual and Automated Compiler Instrumentation [gdcchina.com] and while there was a translator (you could get headphones), most of the attendees chose to listen to the talk in English.

    You may consider making localizable strings for the UI contained in an INI or other file though and be able to check if
  • by SolitaryMan (538416) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:33PM (#42834239) Homepage Journal
    You should've made it a Slashdot poll for accurate results.
    • by olip85 (1770514)
      I have noticed that since Slashdot has been bought by Dice the Slashdot polls seem to be aimed at gathering information for commercial purposes.
  • How hard is it to store all the UI strings in an editable file? Wouldn't that also make your life easier if you decided to tweak the English version?

    As for your code being hard to read, name the strings after their English content: $UI_Text_File_Menu_Save

    • by godrik (1287354)

      Part of it is static strings, but some other things might require more complex processing. The internationalization features of android are quite large and definitely more complicated than switching strings.

      Though as a first cut, that's probably good enough.

    • printf("Copied %n file%s\n", n_files, n_files > 1 ? "s" : "");

      There are languages with more than two grammatical numbers. There are languages that use different word order with different numbers. You need to redesign your simple and easy printf statement to accommodate them, and the outcome is bound to be anything but simple and easy.

  • Should be: English, programmer! do you speak it?
  • A: (Score:5, Informative)

    by msauve (701917) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:42PM (#42834373)
    All the ones who can answer your question do.
  • by Cenan (1892902) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:42PM (#42834381)

    I am a developer, and happen to speak english as a second language. As much as I find it's helpful to my users to have the program's text information presented to the user in their native tongue, I really hate it if the tools I use speak to me in my native language.

    Some vital parts of exceptions tend to get mangled when being translated, and you can't search for relevant information regarding whatever obscure failure you're experiencing unless you translate it back. And Google Translate doesn't do very well with technical terms.

    It is especially unhelpful when the exception has been re-thrown from somewhere deep down, and is being presented with some parts translated, some parts not (I'm looking at YOU Microsoft; "Was this exception text helpful to you?" ( ) No ( ) No (x) Hell No!)

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by nomorecwrd (1193329)
      Real exception message on Spanish localized Windows:

      La memoria no pudo ser "written"

      What?
    • by Splab (574204)

      Amen to that.

      What I really really truely LOATHE is when a program, even when you download the English version, insists on serving you localized stuff. Especially since a lot of open source developers seem to get a hard-on by making up new translations for something.

      Gimp for instance, insists on speaking Danish, with everything translated, which makes it pretty much impossible to use, since the Danish words makes absolutely no sense to anyone except the guy who did the translation. (For those who are in the

    • by KiloByte (825081)

      I have once suffered a terrible, traumatic experience: I plopped my ass at a machine in a lab, and tried reading perl man pages. Turns out, these man pages have been translated to Polish. The last time I checked, Polish was my native language, and I'm not that shabby at perl either. Yet I couldn't understand a single sentence. Finally, I ssh-ed into some place that had man pages in English, and breathed in relief.

      It happened 14 or so years ago, yet I still haven't recovered. Every time I see messages t

  • by jlechem (613317)
    After working for various companies, if they're a US only company sure. But anything with a remote chance of having non US/English speakers is doubtful. I am currently working on code chock full of Japanese comments and variable names. It's a huge freaking PITA. And I'm sure they hate it when I add English comments and variable names to their pristine Japanese code.
  • If you review any of the conversations over on Code Project I think the answer is a resounding 'no'... most programmers don't understand English... or at least fail to use it properly even if it is their native tongue. But I digress... Why don't you let demand drive your decision? Architect the tool such that localization is possible and wait for demand to dictate if/when you go through the hassle of translation.
  • by jfdavis668 (1414919) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:49PM (#42834481)
    I wouldn't assume. SAP is full of German error messages. Star Office / OpenOffice / LibreOffice still have German comments in the code.
  • If it doesn't have end-user exposure, no. Google translate will do the job well enough for non-English speakers, and almost every programmer is an English speaker in any case - or used to Google translations of CS technical papers, in any case.

    If there's actually UI being exposed to an end user rather than a program, then of course there should be some way to localize the end user exposed content, although you should expect that most users won't end up using it, and will opt for English instead, unless it'

  • by NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:54PM (#42834565)
    that I wondered if they "Spoke english". (Ok, I'm from the US but some of us here, our english sucks.)
  • by dejanc (1528235) on Friday February 08, 2013 @01:56PM (#42834593)

    Being a programmer and not understanding English is like being a historian writing papers on the Roman Empire and not knowing Latin. There is a lot of programmers out there who don't understand English or are not comfortable with it, but as a rule, they are not that good.

    You have to learn our profession somehow. Yeah, you can learn C or Java from a book written in your native language, but most APIs out there are documented only in English. If you don't speak English, then your resources are severely limited.

    That being said, if you can do localization, do it. Localization is usually very easy and doesn't require much bloat. You can have volunteers do the actual translation, you just need to get the strings ready, so it shouldn't be more than a couple of hours of your time.

    Some talented programmers are just not talented for learning languages, or prefer to have UI in their own language. They are the ones who Google Translate documentation online, so you'll be doing them a favor.

    • Most of the stuff written during the Roman Empire and by Romans, eg. the stuff we have that you can still read, is written in Greek and not Latin. All the papers about Rome and by Romans are written in Greek. You actually can be a pretty good historian of the Roman Empire and not know Latin. While the common people spoke Latin, they didn't write. And we don't have their writing. Only the elite wrote and they all wrote Greek.

    • I also subscribe to this view. A decent understanding of English should be considered as much a requirement for a programmer as the ability to write a string reversing function. At times I get into arguments with Russian programmers on the subject, some of them believe English should not be required or considered the de-facto standard.

      Best as I can tell, it's safe to assume programmers will know English if their own language is relatively small. My native language is small, has a few introductory-level prog

  • by realsilly (186931) on Friday February 08, 2013 @02:00PM (#42834653)

    .... Hey Programmers, what does the following string say in English?

    "01001000 01000101 01001100 01001100 01001111 00100000 01010111 01001111 01010010 01001100 01000100"

  • by Z00L00K (682162) on Friday February 08, 2013 @02:16PM (#42834891) Homepage

    But I can't figure out what the translator has used to name it in my native language.

    So from one perspective - not using English in the tool you use may cause more confusion than help. Especially for programmers.

    • This is very much true for many Indian languages. Some languages accept English words transliterated into an Indic script (some variant of Devanagari). But some languages have this "purist" mentality and insist on translating them into their own languages. There is a common joke that one purist of Hindi language translated the word "signal" as, "the machine that makes the vehicle that runs on rails go or stop by showing green or red light". Similarly I have seen in Tamil language the word "bus" translated a
  • by Kozar_The_Malignant (738483) on Friday February 08, 2013 @02:19PM (#42834929)
    Based on years of reading /., the answer is clearly, "No!"
  • They understand. They do not comprehend.
  • by bmo (77928) on Friday February 08, 2013 @02:35PM (#42835167)

    English is the current lingua franca of international business, education, science, technology, diplomacy, entertainment, radio, seafaring, and aviation. It has replaced French as the lingua franca of diplomacy since World War II. The rise of English in diplomacy began in 1919, in the aftermath of World War I, when the Treaty of Versailles was written in English as well as in French, the dominant language used in diplomacy until that time. The widespread use of English was further advanced by the prominent international role played by English-speaking nations (the United States and the Commonwealth of Nations) in the aftermath of World War II, particularly in the establishment and organization of the United Nations. English is one of the six official languages of the United Nations (the other five being French, Arabic, Chinese, Russian and Spanish). The seating and roll-call order in sessions of the United Nations and its subsidiary and affiliated organizations is determined by alphabetical order of the English names of the countries.

    When the United Kingdom became a colonial power, English served as the lingua franca of the colonies of the British Empire. In the post-colonial period, some of the newly created nations which had multiple indigenous languages opted to continue using English as the lingua franca to avoid the political difficulties inherent in promoting any one indigenous language above the others. The British Empire established the use of English in regions around the world such as North America, India, Africa, Australia and New Zealand, so that by the late 19th century its reach was truly global,[21] and in the latter half of the 20th century, widespread international use of English was much reinforced by the global economic, financial, scientific, military, and cultural pre-eminence of the English-speaking countries and especially the U.S. Today, more than half of all scientific journals are published in English, while in France, almost one third of all natural science research appears in English,[22] lending some support to English being the lingua franca of science and technology. English is also the lingua franca of international Air Traffic Control and seafaring communications.

    Basically, if you want to get anything done, you do it in English.

    Some day another language may replace English as the lingua franca like French replaced German and Latin. When you have multiple cultures trying to do things, you need to have a common language to do it in.

    None of this should surprise anyone.

    --
    BMO

  • I find mixing my native language (dutch) and english during development only helps to confuse things since pretty much all terminology is english.
    When given the option, I always use english language versions of technical software (some software insists on showing me (badly) translated dutch, though). I even comment my code in english if the entire front-end is dutch only.
    For office software and such, I prefer my native tongue.

  • I am a developer too, and English is my second language (I am from Egypt, and Arabic is my first language). When I learned programming, it was in English using English text books and magazines, ...etc, whether BASIC or COBOL (long time ago).

    Once, after many years in development, I was supporting a place that got a software package developed in Morocco. French is the lingua technica there. So, the source code was totally unitelligible to all of us except one of the Moroccan developers who worked for the comp

  • Given your concerns, if you choose not to use localization, at least consider using simple English words as much as possible.
  • As a Dane who has worked in most of Scandinavia, Germany, Ireland, UK and with a plethora of nationalities from around the world - English is the language of choice for any technical discussion. Even among fellow Danish developers its toe cringing to try to speak in Danish as the words either don't exist or are 'old fashioned' direct translations. Which means if we're talking anything really technical - just switching to English is convenient and mutually understood anyways. So either its fully Danish or w
  • You should have qualified the question better. Did you intend to ask "Do most US programmers understand English?".

    If that was your question, I would say "to some degree" but with the large number of immigrants and visa holders working in the US there would be a percentage that does not.

    When you leave the US, it should make little difference. RFCs, APIs, Specs, Docs, etc.. are all translated to the native language. Larger companies spend healthy sums of money to make their products available in other lang

  • A few thoughts:

    I was told by former colleagues from Sweden and Belgium that given the choice between a crappy translation and the original English, they'd take the original English. A good translation, on the other hand, would be noticed. And respected.

    Tech docs in English, please. Unless you're Arianespace or Airbus.

    As others have pointed out, strings grow in most other languages.

    To smoke out i18n issues one former employer used Pig Latin. YMMV.

    ...laura

  • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Friday February 08, 2013 @03:48PM (#42836159)

    I'm sorry, but programming jargon like "regular expressions (pattern substitution), service packs (bug fixes), binding (pulling information from elsewhere), tuples (an ordered list), virtual void functions (as close to masturbation as it gets in programming) and even web browsing" seemed more designed to obfuscate and inflate the self importance of programmers than convey useful information to anyone who wanted to understand what computing was about.

    In contrast, loops, if-then statements, variables and constants all were pretty clear and made immediate sense

  • I've seen XML with tags in Japanese. Tags in large-character set languages are troublesome. When text has to match exactly, full Unicode is a pain. There are homoglyphs; you can't tell by looking if there's a match.

    There are huge headaches associated with Unicode URLs and domains. There are complex rules for avoiding domains that look visually the same but are different to DNS, and trouble getting the registrars to enforce them. Although they're fully supported by browsers today, they're not widely used

  • by bradley13 (1118935) on Friday February 08, 2013 @04:14PM (#42836499) Homepage

    Every German speaker who studies IT learns enough English to read technical stuff. Many - maybe even most - prefer to use English documentation and tools.

    I will go out on a limb and say that this is probably true for every Western European country except France.

    The French make a real effort to prevent their language from becoming "contaminated" with foreign terms. Where every other language has just adopted computer terms as they were invented, the French have specifically gone to the trouble of inventing different words that sound more French. To take just one example: consider the word "byte". The Spanish say "byte", the Germans say "byte", the Italians say "byte", the Dutch say "byte", but the French say "octet". This is annoying, but really, it's their problem, they've done it to themselves.

  • by inglorion_on_the_net (1965514) on Friday February 08, 2013 @04:46PM (#42836935) Homepage

    Speaking English as a second language and having worked with several developers who speak English as their second language (if at all), I am tempted to say "all the good ones speak English."

    Almost everything related to software development is described in English. It may be described in other languages as well, but I don't know any other language in which as much information is available. The APIs are generally based on English. Diagnostics are pretty much always available in English. Most questions and answers on the Internet are probably in English. English is not that hard to learn, and you will get a lot of benefit from just being able to read it. Really, if you do software development, you should learn English.

    Most software developers I know are good enough at English that they can at least make themselves understood. Those who don't can at least read computer English. Without that, they would be seriously handicapped. Is that an audience you want to cater to? There may be good reasons to do so, but I personally would rather spend my time on other things.

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