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Encryption Security

Ask Slashdot: Encrypted Digital Camera/Recording Devices? 285

Posted by Soulskill
from the where-are-you-planning-on-driving-exactly dept.
Ransak writes "As we hear more and more about dashboard cameras catching unplanned events, I've thought of equipping my vehicles with them just in case that 'one in a billion' moment happens. But given the level of overreach law enforcement has shown, I'd only consider one if I could be assured that the data was secure from prying eyes (e.g., a camera that writes to encrypted SD memory). Are there any solutions for the niche market of the paranoid photographer/videographer?"
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Ask Slashdot: Encrypted Digital Camera/Recording Devices?

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  • This solves what? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by 0100010001010011 (652467) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:01PM (#43296457)

    "Hrm. Well there, this SD card looks blank. Format."

    And it's tossed in the trash because it was broken.

    What you need is something that streams to off site.

  • Why yes, there is. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by girlintraining (1395911) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:05PM (#43296499)

    Are there any solutions for the niche market of the paranoid photographer/videographer?"

    Why yes, yes there is. It's called building it yourself. While encryption isn't illegal, you may have noticed despite the obvious benefits and lack of drawbacks to the consumer, it isn't found pretty much anywhere. This is deliberate: Various law enforcement agencies that don't want to be found out make backroom deals to keep companies from providing this most useful of features because it would make their job more difficult. Or at least, so they say. In truth, they just want access to "ALL THE THINGZ!" regardless of whether there's a legitimate judiciary need for it. And encryption means they'd have to serve warrants and stuff to get the keys, not just go clandestine copy-pasta on your personal data.

    So your niche market isn't niche at all -- it would already be out there, if not for the authoritarian governments of the world (I'm looking at you "free" western society). Now with that out of the way, you can roll your own easily. Embedded devices with a USB connector and linux are a dime a dozen, and most sport the ability to store data to an SD or CF card, as well as boot off of them. It's possible to create one-way encryption so something can be written to using a public key, but only decrypted using a private key not located on the same physical device. This would provide you with a tamper-evident system, and simultaniously provide full protection for your privacy; You can't recover the data without the key, and the data cannot be modified without it either.

  • Camouflage (Score:5, Insightful)

    by FrankSchwab (675585) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:07PM (#43296523) Journal

    Hmm, an SD card plugged into your camera, sticking out in plain view, with nothing on it. A second card, installed under the dash, that does the recording. "Why no, officer, I don't believe the camera was turned on".

  • by hawguy (1600213) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:09PM (#43296537)

    "Hrm. Well there, this SD card looks blank. Format."

    And it's tossed in the trash because it was broken.

    What you need is something that streams to off site.

    I thought he was clear on the problem that encryption solves: the level of overreach law enforcement ....assured that the data was secure from prying eyes

    He wasn't looking for a solution to prevent him from throwing away an SD card that he recorded his encrypted steam to - how is that even a problem? I have a flash drive right here with gigabytes of encrypted data and I haven't thrown it away because it contains gigabytes of encrypted data.

  • by mpoulton (689851) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:14PM (#43296607)
    The only actual solution is to stream the video to off-site hosted storage, preferably in an inconvenient foreign jurisdiction. If it's stored on the device, it's subject to seizure - whether encrypted or not. Losing the video is often worse than having it viewed by someone against your will. And rest assured, if you record something really bad, there's a good chance someone will destroy the recording device (whether the perpetrator is government or non-government).
  • by thesandbender (911391) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:20PM (#43296677)
    No. There's not a substantial market for it. The market is for things that make it _easier_ for people to post every last second of their lives online (Facebook, Twitter, Vine, Instragram, Youtube, etc). The vast majority of the public will see encryption or anything else that interferes with instant narcissism as broken.
  • by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968@ g m a i l.com> on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:26PM (#43296769) Journal

    Too much work, too hard to insure you always have a signal. The answer to this one is actually pretty simple...carputer. You can either DIY with one of several kits or a friend of mine has made a good living installing mini-HTPC boxes based on Bobcat chips in trunks, its really not hard and these chips are ultra low power so its not a drain. Add an SSD using Truecrypt and voila! The cops pull the plug to get the SSD out and all they have is a brick without your Truecrypt password. There are plenty of little 5 inch touchscreens you can mount in the front so you can input your password as you are starting up and if you decide you want to keep anything you recorded 5 minutes with a portadrive and Bob's your uncle.

    This ask Slashdot frankly ain't hard, hand me $600 plus the cost of the parts and I can have it done over a weekend, going DIY if you don't have exp in this kind of deal will take a little longer but if you can follow instructions and use basic common sense? Really not that hard. You can go wireless to the carputer (costs more) or you can run the wires around the door frames (cheaper but more of a PITA) to the cameras and an AMD bobcat with a stripped down OS like Win 7 Tiny or Puppy Linux can easily record a couple of cameras no problem, its a 1.7GHz dual core after all. So its really not hard, just takes a little time and depending on how fancy he wants to get it can cost anywhere from $500-$1500, price depending on how many cams, the quality, what kind of extra features like being able to playback video or surf on the carputer, etc.

  • by Bomarc (306716) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @05:57PM (#43297203) Homepage
    #1: Argue that at the point of a gun ... or with 5-15 cops "talking" to you (Hint: You will lose)
    #2: Once you "lose" control of your SD card (given to - or - taken by the officer) ... it magically becomes erased with the images that were important.

    I would think ... is there someway to have a camera with 2 SD cards, one hidden?
    ... Wifi xfer images to a hidden system in the 'car' or in a backpack {yours or that of a friend}?

    .... or one could try the old "watch in a camera" trick.
  • by girlintraining (1395911) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @06:02PM (#43297241)

    No. There's not a substantial market for it. The market is for things that make it _easier_ for people to post every last second of their lives online (Facebook, Twitter, Vine, Instragram, Youtube, etc). The vast majority of the public will see encryption or anything else that interferes with instant narcissism as broken.

    Amazon [amazon.com] says "No." There is a growing market for dashboard cameras. And they're cheap. Really cheap. Forbes [forbes.com] even published an article last month suggesting that they may become mandatory on new cars. As far as people posting "every last second of their lives online." You should really google "russian dash camera". They love posting those things online. It's quite the rage right now. No sir, you are dead wrong.

    The market is very much alive and growing fast. And nowhere is "instant narcissism" listed in the reasons people are buying them. Security. Safety. Documenting scams people try to pull (Drive a nice car? Got nice insurance. Target for a personal injury scam). Documenting the police "No officer, I wasn't speeding, and this GPS-enabled dash cam proves it." The only "instant narcissism" I see is from a jaded troll on slashdot going for extra karma by dragging in a favorite scratching post for the slashkiddies: Hipsters. And hey, while I appreciate the sentiment, you're just flat wrong here.

  • by fustakrakich (1673220) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @06:06PM (#43297295) Journal

    All that sounds great in the classroom/laboratory, but in the street it's pure bullshit. The cops can and will do want they want any time they think they will get away with it, including rape [cbslocal.com]. and the biggest lie they continue to tell is that it's not systematic. Well, it is, and the only anomaly is getting caught.

  • by cffrost (885375) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @06:25PM (#43297477) Homepage

    What police have the right to do and what police do are two very different things.

  • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @06:27PM (#43297499)

    Either it isn't thought through, or it is chimera. The thing is if you what you are worried about it corrupt cop does something you record, they stop you, and take the recording away, encryption does fuck-all to stop that. The cops steal the gear, that is that.

    The solution to that is a backup, or a fake item. A setup where the obvious camera isn't the one that records, or that there is a second SD card elsewhere that has a copy or something.

    Encryption is only useful if he wants to be able to cover his tracks, and selectively release video. This is precisely what corrupt police like to do with their dash cams. They use them to protect themselves, but turn them off or "lose" the video when they are breaking the law.

    So to me it implies that he probably like breaking traffic law, and doesn't want the evidence of that around, but still wants to be able to record things.

  • Re:Why (Score:5, Insightful)

    by pixelpusher220 (529617) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @07:29PM (#43298007)

    Well you know that they can get a warrant to force you to decrytpt it

    The 5th Amendment would tend to disagree with you, at least in the US. Now if they grant you immunity, then yes you have to decrypt it, but then you have immunity and are not at risk.

    to be honest if you driving on the public highway is there any reasonable reason why you would want to deny law enforcement access to it?

    Because I want to and it's a free society?

    try to hide your footage implies that you have been doing something naughty driving wise.

    It implies nothing more than I don't want other people to see it without my permission.

  • by http (589131) on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @08:07PM (#43298319) Homepage Journal
    You're reading this poorly.

    Encryption is only useful if he wants to be able to cover his tracks, and selectively release video.

    ...or have an officer believe "This is not evidence that can be used against me." Count yourself lucky that you don't have enough experience with corrupt police officers to understand how they operate.

    "I was recorded committing a crime, but I can use as much force as I want without any consequences in order to change how much evidence becomes available to prosecutors, who are mostly my buddies. Plus, my partner has been inculcated to back me up on anything and everything with a straight face. If I fire my gun, though, there's going to be a hell of a lot of paperwork."

  • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo@woCURIErld3.net minus physicist> on Wednesday March 27, 2013 @09:17PM (#43298817) Homepage

    Yeah, the only people who care about privacy are criminals and bad drivers.

    Fuck you. Really.

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