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Ask Slashdot: Can Yahoo Actually Stage a Comeback? 260

Posted by Soulskill
from the titans-versus-dinosaurs dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Fresh off purchasing Tumblr for $1.1 billion, Yahoo has moved to the next stage of what's becoming a company-wide reboot: fixing Flickr, the photo-sharing service that it acquired in 2005 and subsequently allowed to languish. Yahoo boosted Flickr accounts' individual storage capacity to one free terabyte, revamped the Website's overall look, and launched a new Flickr app for Google Android, among other tweaks. Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer clearly wants her company to fight toe-to-toe on features with Google and Facebook, but she faces a long road ahead of her: not only does she need to streamline Yahoo's cumbersome corporate structure and product portfolio into something that resembles fighting shape, but she needs to reverse the general perception that Yahoo is teetering on the edge of history's trash-bin, with an aging customer base and unexciting features. The question is, could anyone actually pull it off? Is Yahoo capable of an Apple-style turnaround, or are its current actions merely delaying the inevitable?"
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Ask Slashdot: Can Yahoo Actually Stage a Comeback?

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  • Of course (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MrEricSir (398214) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @05:00PM (#43787785) Homepage

    Yahoo *could* stage a comeback, but why? What makes a product or service from Yahoo unique?

    Can't answer that question? Of course not. Yahoo is a holding company made up of numerous acquisitions. [wikipedia.org] If there's an identity buried in there somewhere, it's a Frankenstein's monster, stitched together out of spare parts. There's nothing cohesive about Yahoo, nothing that makes it special as a company, and there never was.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @05:03PM (#43787841)

    is a complete and utter disaster.

  • Re:Of course (Score:4, Insightful)

    by sribe (304414) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @05:05PM (#43787865)

    Can't answer that question? Of course not. Yahoo is a holding company made up of numerous acquisitions. [wikipedia.org] If there's an identity buried in there somewhere, it's a Frankenstein's monster, stitched together out of spare parts. There's nothing cohesive about Yahoo, nothing that makes it special as a company, and there never was.

    That's all true. But the question is whether or not that can be changed ;-)

  • by 0123456 (636235) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @05:15PM (#43787967)

    Yes, it is. It's a horrible Metroised mess of pictures that trades function for shiny.

  • Re:Of course (Score:2, Insightful)

    by PlastikMissle (2498382) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @05:32PM (#43788175)
    I understand the "overrated" part, but why the "bimbo" part?
  • by Tablizer (95088) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @05:38PM (#43788261) Journal

    Yahoo had the perfect opportunity for roll-your-sites and social networks. Geocities and related services were popular in the late 90's, but they didn't improve the products, such as making them more click-to-build etc. so users didn't have to learn HTML. They sat on it and it rotted. They also had a reputation for crappy customer service. They could have been the next Facebook + Google.

  • No. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Lumpy (12016) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @05:50PM (#43788389) Homepage

    Not with the complete Moron CEO they have. That woman has no idea how to run a business. You do NOT insult your customers to gain market share...

    Her Comments , “There’s no such thing as Flickr Pro today because [with so many people taking photographs] there’s really no such thing as professional photographers anymore...”

    I really hope someone told her that she was a complete idiot for saying those words at a press conference.

  • by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968@@@gmail...com> on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @06:01PM (#43788515) Journal

    Yeah this is a giant fail because the whole point of "Ask Slashdot" is to ask solvable problems that are too geeky for your usual places, stuff like "How can I record securely in my car" or like the problem I had with a customer whose computers kept getting hacked i asked in the comments where it turned out his router had been compromised, its for questions which can actually be ANSWERED.

    Whether Yahoo can pull off a come back or not should really be under general, not under Ask Slashdot. As for the question itself, if they continue to not be MSFT? Its possible, I've been making countless Yahoo accounts for customers pissed off at MSFT killing Live Messenger and Hotmail so they could pick up those users and run with them as long as they don't shit all over the UIs like MSFT does.

  • by AdamHaun (43173) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @06:05PM (#43788569) Journal

    Apple started off making computers (or maybe "integrated hardware/software experiences" is a better way to put it). After their comeback, they still made computers. Now their big thing is portable computers -- a big change, but still related to what they always did. Their focus is on design and UX expertise.

    Yahoo started off making a hierarchical directory of web sites, then dove into the web portal craze of the late 1990s. After their comeback, they will ___________. Their focus is on ___________.

    Fill in the blanks. It's not going to be what they did before, because nobody wants more hierarchical web directories and portals. They have a bunch of people still using their webmail, so that's one option. GMail wiped the floor with them before, but it's been getting clunky lately thanks to G+. Yahoo could try to recapture the clean simplicity of Google's early days. That would be a big challenge indeed -- as a portal company, the idea of leaving blank space on a web page is utterly alien to them.

    It looks like they're producing independent news. That's an interesting option -- they could compete with the Huffington Post et al. Online news is still based strongly on newspapers, so there's room for someone to shake up the format.

    This all seems like a stretch, though. Yahoo's name has little value, and their current expertise isn't very helpful. All they bring to the table is more money than a startup, but it probably won't be enough to save them. Then again, that's what I said about Apple too.

  • Re:No. (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Bohnanza (523456) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @06:36PM (#43788823)
    She is hot, though.
  • by ADRA (37398) on Tuesday May 21, 2013 @08:13PM (#43789481)

    Dude, Firefox has worked as well as it always has. Just because its not your cup of tea doesn't make it crappy. One could say the same about IE if you really liked the product differentiation(I'd never, but I can understand the argument) then who am I to say differently.

    Should we all go out and use Unity, Gnome3, Windows8 just because its new and shiny? No. We use what works for us, and if you don't like it then at least keep the smug to yourself.

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