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+ - At what point has a Kickstarter project failed? 2

Submitted by skywiseguy
skywiseguy (1347553) writes "I have only used Kickstarter to back a single project so far, but one of the backers of that project pointed us to a project promising video capable glasses which was once one of the top 10 highest funded projects in Kickstarter history. After reading through the comments, it is obvious that the project has not met its expected deadline of "Winter 2011" but the project team rarely gives any updates with concrete information, all emails sent to them by backers get a form letter in reply, they routinely delete negative comments from their Facebook page, and apparently very soon after the project was funded, they posted pictures of themselves on a tropical beach with the tagline "We are not on a beach in Thailand." Their early promotions were featured on Engadget and other tech sites but since the project was funded they've rarely, if ever, communicated in more than a form letter. So at what point can a project like this be considered to have failed? And if you had backed a project with this kind of lack of communication from the project team, what would you consider to be the best course of action? Disclaimer: I have not backed this project, but I am very interested in funding Kickstarter projects and I do not want to get caught sending money to a less than reputable project. According to the above project's backers, Kickstarter claims to have no mechanism for refunding money to backers of failed projects and no way to hold the project team accountable to their backers. This does not seem like a healthy environment for someone who is averse to giving their money to scam artists."
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At what point has a Kickstarter project failed?

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  • Doesn't Kickstart require an account to propose a project for funding? Doesn't Kickstart have identifying information that can be used to sue somebody if they commit fraud?
    • As someone who's had a project successfully backed on Kickstarter; they certainly have the information to identify me. I think it'd be more accurate to say that Amazon would have more play in fraud as they're the one that actually handles the transaction processing as well as funding through their payment system. Kickstarter doesn't hold the purse strings in these transactions so it makes them less accountable when things go wrong (in the case of a scam.)

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