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Ask Slashdot: Smart Electronics For a Marathoner? 169

New submitter IMightB writes: My question is basically what is the best smart watch style device for runners. Must have features GPS, bluetooth and music storage for roughly 5 hours of use during a marathon. Pretty much everything else is a nice to have. My wife has recently decided to enter her first marathon and unfortunately, the other day during a training run her 7gen iPod Mini gave up the ghost due to moisture accumulating in the armband and her Garmin Forerunner 15 only lasts about 3 hours with GPS on (despite Manufacturer claims to the contrary). She would like to consolidate devices down to something with a watch style format and start using a bluetooth headset. I currently use, and really like, a pair of aging Jaybird JF3's for a bluetooth headset and will probably recommend to her whatever Jaybirds current equivalent is in their lineup. But the watch portion is eluding me still. Based on my current research, the Sony SmartWatch 3 may be the only one that fits my wife's 'Must have Requirements' Are there other options available? Can anyone with marathon or distance running experience share their thoughts on this subject? Thanks in Advance.
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Ask Slashdot: Smart Electronics For a Marathoner?

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    I am an avid marathoner I am looking for something similar. This is what I have my eye on http://www.motorola.com/us/consumers/watch/Moto-360-Sport/moto-360-sport.html

  • by damn_registrars ( 1103043 ) <damn.registrars@gmail.com> on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @08:48PM (#50867775) Homepage Journal
    I hear of runners running (no pun intended) into trouble when they are out practicing while wearing headphones. If she's just getting started, do you really want to prioritize on that?
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by onkelonkel ( 560274 )

      Three posts in and we already have the obligatory "Why would you want to do that?" response. Some things never change.

      • by hawguy ( 1600213 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @11:04PM (#50868415)

        I hear of runners running (no pun intended) into trouble when they are out practicing while wearing headphones. If she's just getting started, do you really want to prioritize on that?

        Three posts in and we already have the obligatory "Why would you want to do that?" response. Some things never change.

        It's a valid point - many races ban headphones [napavalleymarathon.org] and running on streets with headphones is not just a bad [orlandosentinel.com] idea [runnersworld.com], it's outright stupid. [livescience.com] Anything that reduces your situational awareness out on the road is a bad thing - especially when you're out on a 20 mile run and towards the end, you just want to get home.

        • many races ban headphones

          I wondered about that with footraces, I know bicycle road racing prohibits such things even in ITTs. There's also the concept of 'dont' do anything different in training than you'll do when racing'.

        • by IMightB ( 533307 )

          Good to know, I'll have her check into this. The two half marathons shes done have not banned them.

      • by IMightB ( 533307 )

        Ha OP here? My co-workers outed me this morning, because I posed to them the same question. They don't believe that I have a wife either! My wife is amazing and she does what she puts her mind to. For example, she's conquered all the official and un-official 14ers in Colorado.

        The question I pose to most ./ers is: Can your wife do that?

    • I hear of them running into trouble without wearing headphones. Since we no nothing of the circumstances in which she will be running how can we question the prioritisation?

  • Does not exist. I've never heard of a Garmin that only has a 3 hour battery life, I think you may have gotten a lemon. I don't think Apple makes a nano/shuffle with bluetooth so she may end up using her phone for music. The GPS on the phone apps is not as good as Garmin or the other running watches so you will end up with at least 2 devices. I recommend the Garmin 220 for the watch, I don't have a good answer for music.
    • by blackfeltfedora ( 2855471 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @08:54PM (#50867807)
      DC Rainmaker has in-depth reviews of pretty much every running/cycling/fitness device made for the past decade, I recommend looking there. http://www.dcrainmaker.com/ [dcrainmaker.com]
      • by ByTor-2112 ( 313205 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @09:15PM (#50867917)

        Parent is correct about DC Rainmaker. He's very thorough and accurate.

        For tunes, I recommend an ipod shuffle (the ONLY apple product I use). It's perfect for sports, it's VERY cheap, the battery lasts a long time, and if it can handle my sweat it can handle anything.

        Your garmin watch should not be having these problems. A 3 hour battery life is either a dud battery or something weird wrong with the software. Try a full reset. Regardless, you won't find anything better than a forerunner.

        • Indeed. I thought it was weird that a Forerunner would only have 3 hours of run time.

          I bought one a decade ago that had at least 10 hours. And given Garmin's market, I don't think they'd create something that would last only 3 hours.

          • Garmins support is also excellent. They are known to warranty for a small fee devices that are way past their warranty end date. Depends on the circumstances, but there is no harm in trying.

            • by IMightB ( 533307 )

              Good to know, I'll check out doing a full reset as another poster mentioned. If that doesn't work, I'll try Garmin's Support

              Thanks!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Just get one. I know you want one. Stop making up stories about a "marathoner wife". We are geeks, we understand.

  • Haven't tried it yet, but seems promising. gps, heart rate and 4GB of storage, should last long enough for a marathon.

    Runner's watches are slightly different than the usual smartwatches, as they have built-in gps and better battery life than ordinary smart watches, which rely on your phone fro music and gps.
    I use a Polar m400 for gps while running, and it lasts about a week with daily 6mile running (gps tracking). Unfortunately no music on that one.

    • by gyepi ( 891047 )
      I second the TomTom Spark, here is a quick overview from the best sports-watch review site:

      TomTom Spark impressions [dcrainmaker.com].

      I use an earlier version of TomTom Cardio, which is really great. In case you'd want also want to have optical heart rate monitoring (which the TomTom Spark hs) then it's pretty much the only choice, as most other optical heart rate monitors are quite inaccurate when it comes to sports, see D.C. Rainmaker's review of them on the same site.
  • Timex Ironman (Score:5, Informative)

    by hawguy ( 1600213 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @08:57PM (#50867821)

    Timex Ironman 50 lap watch:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Timex-... [ebay.com]

    That watch trained me through at least 10 marathons and a couple Ironmans. I had a Garmin GPS watch + Heartrate monitor for a while, but I found myself paying more attention to it than just paying attention to my body.

    50 splits so I can get splits for each mile of the marathon. The "Flix" backlight was handy for night runs so a flick of the wrist turns on the light. Battery lasts for years, and the watch is 100% waterproof (which is more than I can say for the Garmin - I had to send it back for repair twice when water got inside)

  • Consider a single earpiece, a Motorola Elite Flip or Silver. Excellent battery life, good audio if only in one ear, and a free ear might be handy. But I really like my BackBeat Fits.

    Several battery cases are out there for iPhones.

    An NXE armband might work better against moisture. Find them in TJMaxx, or of course the usual discount haunts.

  • I have the same watch but with the hiking firmware. The Foretrex and I get EASILY 6 hours out of it.

    You need to contact Garmin and have it sent in for repair, you have a bad battery in yours.

  • Excellent question. While I'm not a marathoner I am a half-marathon runner and have some experience with this.

    The Pebble/Pebble Time supports showing running stats on the watch when synced up with RunKeeper or Endomondo. There might be other apps available but those are the two I've used.

    They require that you have a smartphone drive them, and you'd have to have enough smartphone battery to not have the phone die while using GPS for your run.

    Both apps let you start/pause/stop your run from the watch. I used

  • I've tried a number of devices for fitness. Anything with built-in GPS is going to seriously degrade your battery life while it's on. Even phones drain insanely fast when using actual GPS satellite signals instead of wifi for geolocation. 2 hours of continuous high-resolution GPS tracking is going to be par for the course for this type of device.

    • by dcw3 ( 649211 )

      I've been using Garmin GPS watches, running 3 half marathons in the last ten years. One of those took me 4 hours because of foot issues. But none of them came close to using all of the battery life.

      • by IMightB ( 533307 )

        I'm a BIG Garmin/Suunto fan, I currently use a VivoSmart for daily use and the only time it comes off my wrist is a once a week charging. It does everything I need nearly perfectly. From on-call to exercise. I also have a Suunto hiking watch from the early 00's. To your knowledge, does Garmin combine the three things I listed (GPS, Music storage/playback, bluetooth) in one device?

        • by dcw3 ( 649211 )

          No. I had been using my iPod(s), but they proved unable to hold up to sweat soaked armbands, twice. My favorite was my first iPod, a shuffle that lasted several years, but had no bluetooth. I don't know of a single device that combines your list, but I haven't been hunting for one.

  • A Couple Thoughts (Score:4, Informative)

    by quantaman ( 517394 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @09:21PM (#50867951)

    Must have features GPS, bluetooth and music storage for roughly 5 hours of use during a marathon.

    Music/podcasts are great for training but generally frowned upon in actual races, I think a lot of big marathons actually ban them since people not hearing could be a safety issue.

    I've personally never had an issue getting bored during races and for training I just bring my phone and a pair of bluetooth headphones for podcasts.

    Garmin Forerunner 15 only lasts about 3 hours with GPS on (despite Manufacturer claims to the contrary)

    That sounds like a warranty issue. I don't know about the 15 but my old 301 lasted through the entirety of a 10.5 hour ultra.

    That being said if I were to get a new watch I might be tempted to peak at the smart watches.

    • by PPH ( 736903 )

      Music/podcasts are great for training but generally frowned upon in actual races,

      It might be better to seperate the music from the other functions. Get something like an iPod Shuffle and do the rest with a GPS/monitor device. For a bit more bulk than a watch, a Garmin eTrex 30 will do GPS, altimiter and talk to an external heart rate monitor (and record your data as you go). I know some people who will cycle a course and download the elevation data into a programmable stationary cycle. The recorded data 'duplicates' the course elevation for trining purposes.

      The battery life is about 25

      • by IMightB ( 533307 )

        I'm not saying I don't agree with separate devices, but I'm just trying to meet the requirements listed by the Boss, before I make a case against them.

  • by bleh-of-the-huns ( 17740 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @09:25PM (#50867971)

    Most organized sporting events (marathons and bike races at least) ban headphones.

    So while great for training, they are worthless for the event. Some people rely on music for motivation, which is fine, but I would suggest you get used to it without.

    And when training, keep only one ear bud in, I cannot tell you how many runners did not hear me yelling on your left to pass and then they get frightened and pissed when I do pass. sennheiser make decent sports earbuds.

    And I suspect you got a lemon Garmin. I used to use the forerunner 300 I used before I got my edge 810. The 300 lasted me a good 8 hours. The 810 lasts me about 5 hours when I used live tracking (paired to phone provides realtime tracking for family or friends, good for long solo rides for safety).

    • by dcw3 ( 649211 )

      I've participated in dozens of races, and not one banned headphones...I don't personally wear them. I know some do, but I doubt "Most" is correct.

  • Yea, you need the game system, a collection of games, pizza, caffeinated drinks and multiple sets of batteries for your wireless controllers and head sets.... The trick is to keep everything within arms reach of the recliner you are sitting in.

    Oh wait... You are talking about physically RUNNING as in OUTSIDE and more than 5 paces? Dude... We don't do that here on Slashdot.

    Also, how on earth did you catch a wife that runs? I mean a real one, I thought we had lower standards than that here.... Turn in th

  • A Verizon Flip-Phone.

    I have run marathons, utltras, and crazy trail running courses like the Grand Canyon Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim, the only thing I have with me is a reliable Verizon flip phone. It has plenty of battery, plays, MP3s with a micro-SD card. I mostly listen to audio books. For me, since I do a lot of trail running in Central Oregon, and other remote places, Verizon has the best service. The flip phone is super lightweight and has weeks of standby time, and will play my MP3s all day long with ple

  • by CaptainJeff ( 731782 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @09:29PM (#50867997)
    Perhaps...you could just go out and run?

    Seriously. I've done multiple marathons, the Disney Goofy Challenge, a number of triathlons including two Ironman races, etc... You don't need all this fancy stuff. Just make sure you keep a phone with you (or your wife in this case) in case you have an emergency, bring ample water and snacks if you're out for long training runs, and enjoy the time. Get away from computers, TVs, phones, etc. Enjoy being outside. If you and your wife are running together, then enjoy the time together, working to a common goal, away from all of the hustle of normal life where everything is connected.

    Running without all the crap is the best, most enjoyable, time for me. I love it. I used to run with music, GPS tracking, etc. Now, just a phone in case of emergency and sometimes not even that. Give it a try. You'll love it. And your wife will too.
    • by dargaud ( 518470 )
      When I used to run, I'd get get bored to death if I didn't have music with me. It was just training for more adrenaline infused activities, so I found it boring. Now I just climb and mountain-bike every day, no more need for running ;-) but I understand OP's question.
    • Perhaps...you could just go out and run?

      Why? I mean it's good exercise and all, but running is incredibly boring unless you're running somewhere, even then it's about as exciting as being stuck in traffic with a busted car radio.

      *Many* people do not enjoy running for the fulfilling invigorating experience some people claim it is. Heck only a few weeks ago I was out on my weekly run and the battery went flat on my iPod Shuffle only 30min in. That was me done. I'm not prepared to run around without some nice music.
      As for each other's company, that'

    • Nobody "needs" fancy stuff when the goal is only to have fun, but a heart rate monitor is now pretty much essential for serious training and amateur competition. Not only it allows you to train with much better efficiency, but during competition it allows you to better manage your energy and counter the crowd effect. More fancy stuff will even give you data about your stride to correct mistakes you might not be aware while running. Analyzing your race might reveal weaknesses and so indicate what kind of tra

    • All good advice once you've reached the point of enjoyment. I can assure you, no-one starts out at that point.

      At the start it's a goal, usually related to performance and improvement. "All this fancy stuff" is to provide feedback that the goal is getting closer, and on what needs to be done to work in the right direction. And then, after a long time of hard work, the point where enjoyment of running for its own sake can be reached.

      Very few people find enjoyment in starting out running, without feedback and

    • Perhaps...you could just go out and run?

      Seriously. I've done multiple marathons, the Disney Goofy Challenge, a number of triathlons including two Ironman races, etc... You don't need all this fancy stuff. Just make sure you keep a phone with you (or your wife in this case) in case you have an emergency, bring ample water and snacks if you're out for long training runs, and enjoy the time. Get away from computers, TVs, phones, etc. Enjoy being outside. If you and your wife are running together, then enjoy the time together, working to a common goal, away from all of the hustle of normal life where everything is connected.

      Running without all the crap is the best, most enjoyable, time for me. I love it. I used to run with music, GPS tracking, etc. Now, just a phone in case of emergency and sometimes not even that. Give it a try. You'll love it. And your wife will too.

      That's very subjective. I despise running. I love to play sports and can handle running around chasing a ball all day. But even a mile of running is torture for me. Due to a permanent sports injury, I am pretty much unable to engage in any other convenient form of exercise besides running. I could join a gym with a swimming pool (for some reason I can swim laps all day - it's like meditation to me), but there are none near me, my office, or commute. So I run. I don't listen to music, though. I end u

    • by IMightB ( 533307 )

      I guess she could "just go out and run", care to be the one to tell her? She's done 2 half marathons so far, Destination Races - Kelowna BC and the Denver Rock N Roll half marathon and is just ramping up to do more. I'm not really much of a runner, I'm more of a Hockey Guy (As our son would say) https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com] is more my style. though after watching her run, I'm starting to feel inspired to try running a bit myself.

  • The Apple Watch works great for tracking running, there are a number of running apps on iOS that work with it - Runkeeper in particular will work and measure distance on the watch alone even without you carrying an iPhone with you, I think by measuring average stride when you do have the phone with you.

    It also has a very good battery life and a heart rate monitor which is handy.

    The only missing ingredient: You didn't mention if you had an iPhone which it requires... but you also did not explicitly rule out

  • by turbidostato ( 878842 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @09:39PM (#50868049)

    "Must have features GPS, bluetooth and music storage for roughly 5 hours of use during a marathon. Pretty much everything else is a nice to have."

    Nobody else found funny that for a sport watch a clock/chronograph is not among the "must haves"? And it supposedly is a "smart" one!

    • "Must have features GPS, bluetooth and music storage for roughly 5 hours of use during a marathon. Pretty much everything else is a nice to have."

      Nobody else found funny that for a sport watch a clock/chronograph is not among the "must haves"? And it supposedly is a "smart" one!

      It's kind of implied. If you have a GPS receiver, you have a clock.

  • by singularity ( 2031 ) * <.nowalmart. .at. .gmail.com.> on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @09:42PM (#50868069) Homepage Journal

    I have been running for 30+ years at this point.

    Some points:
    * There is not going to be a perfect device. As the saying goes, a Swiss Army Knife is no replacement for a well stocked toolbox. A few dedicated devices will do the trick much better than an all-in-one device will.

    * While listening to music while running can make the time go a little faster, a running partner will be a much better addition. When it is dark and snowing outside and you are warm and in your bed, knowing that someone is going to be meeting you in 30 minutes is better motivation than anything else. Training should also always allow you to talk while you run (otherwise you are going too fast). Having someone there to talk to makes sure you are going at the right pace.

    * Once you have some experience with them, a heart rate monitor can really guide training. Pace can be affected by ambient temperature, wind, inclines, and other factors. Your heart rate is a better indicator of effort.

    * I have not had the Forerunner 15. I have had the FR60, the ForeRunner 405, and the ForeRunner 220. All of them have been able to get 3+ hours. The 405 was the worst of the bunch, but that was a relatively early GPS watch. Even then, it got 3+ hours for the first year or so. The 220 gets 6+ hours - I have honestly never gotten the battery down very low. Even after 3+ hour runs, it is showing more than 50% left. I generally use the 220 for 3-4 runs before I consider charging it back up.

    * I never run with my phone. It is partly because of bulk, and mostly because I go running to get outside and get away from the always-on world we live in. I only listen to music on my long runs, and for that I have an older iPod Shuffle.

    * As others have mentioned, http://www.dcrainmaker.com/pro... [dcrainmaker.com] is the best review site out there.

    * Based on your needs, I would consider Garmin's newest watches, the 230 or the 235: http://www.dcrainmaker.com/201... [dcrainmaker.com] I would also purchase an iPod Shuffle. If wireless is a big requirement, I would look at the iPod Nano and BlueTooth headphones.

    • This! I have never understood people who bring their telephone along while running.
      Really, do you want to be able to receive calls while training, or is one so addicted to whatsapp and similar stuff that it has to be used even while running?
      Maybe useful to call in an emergency when I get into an accident... But that it a risk I take. In four years or running, I never needed to make a call while training.
      • by dcw3 ( 649211 )

        My daughter used to go running through a nearby park. My wife insisted that she bring her phone for safety reasons. That was years ago, but my daughter still runs with the phone. As a parent, I like the idea that I could find her (where's my phone) if I became concerned.

        • Using your phone as a tracking device could be useful. It did not know it could do that. Using that, you might get all kinds of information from it then. Such as route data that you could overlay on a map, combined with what speed you are making where...
    • * There is not going to be a perfect device. As the saying goes, a Swiss Army Knife is no replacement for a well stocked toolbox. A few dedicated devices will do the trick much better than an all-in-one device will. ...

      * I never run with my phone. It is partly because of bulk,

      A lot of people seem to forget what makes the Swiss Army Knife "perfect" in the first place. But you seemed to have remembered half way through your post. All the more reason to have an all in one device that does everything including play music wirelessly.

    • by Malc ( 1751 )

      As I runner of just 15 years, I'm of the attitude that all you really need is a pair of shoes, and clothes don't need to be special. Keep it minimal and just enjoy the run.

      Due to continuous breakdowns due to injury I switched to finger shoes (and been fine since), which are awesome for taking on business trips because they take no space in my bag. I learnt a good lesson on one trip to Shanghai though, out with the Hash House Harriers... always carry a phone and some money because there's nothing more scar

  • I run.
    Marathons, half-marathons, long (8 hours) orienteering competitions, whatnot.
    I won't tell you what to buy, but I can suggest some more "must have" features.

    1) If she is serious about her training, she will need a heart rate monitor. At least as a beginner. Experience will help her understand her body without a HR belt later, but first, she will need this experience!
    2) She will do intervals, right? Some watches are better at that than others. Good, clear display is a must. Audible signals (beeps
  • Did you look in a runner's community forum?

    http://community.runnersworld.com/forum/gear-electronics/ [runnersworld.com]

    This is a really common topic there.

  • Microsoft Band 2 is your answer. Standalone gps, standalone music playback, etc. you don't need to take your phone with you. It has a hr sensor and even measures altitude changes for the pesky hills. When you're done running it can show you your stats via the watch, the web, iPhone, android, or windows phone. It's a really nice little device.
    • I'll second that. I just got a Band 2 (had the original Band before) and it's great for running or biking. Has a built in GPS, heart rate monitor and a bunch of other sensors, and nice battery life (about 40 hrs for me). It can sync with iPhones, Androids, and of course Windows Phones.
  • "Scotty. Beam me to the finish line."

  • by Walter White ( 1573805 ) on Wednesday November 04, 2015 @10:34PM (#50868309)

    First off, you need to protect your electronics from perspiration. Both my wife and I have destroyed MP3 players and I have destroyed a cell phone due to perspiration. I put mine in ziploc bags or use those plastic bubbles used for shipping things.

    Best option for marathons is one of the dedicated GPS watches. I have a Garmin Forerunner 405 and it was capable of lasting through a marathon (5+ hours for me.) At present I use a running app on my Nexus 5x and use it with a Moto 360. The advantage of that is:
    - choice of running/activity apps.
    - watch eliminates need to pull phone out to start/stop/pause
    - watch has configurable screens for whatever stats I want to see.

    Downside -
      - Moto 360 battery won't last through a marathon. (Maybe with the right app...)
      - Requires the phone - but a newer Moto watch has a built in GPS. Might still need the phone for the HRM though.

    At the end of the race when I'm hot and sweaty it can be really difficult to stop the run on either watch or phone. Touch screens don't react well to sweat tracks.

  • ...and I did all of them with a series of iPod nanos for tunes (replacing when they broke, got soaked, whatever), and a Garmin 305 for tracking distance. The 305 is the most accurate gps watch I've found that, while it doesn't have a lot of nice features (color screen, map details, start up time less than 15 minutes), it has been invaluable for training and the race, never letting me down on accuracy. I haven't found a do-all tool that I could stand to run with (I like the idea of the apple watch, but runni
  • For music, I use a SanDisk Sansa Clip Zip with Rockbox installed. I've used SanDisk players for years, and they are great for running. It has the advantage of being small, long battery life, good storage (8GB, but with a micro SD card slot for a lot more music) and cheap.

    For marathons, I recommend a watch to help keep your pace and to keep track of your progress. The Timex Ironman watches are pretty solid. I haven't felt the need to have additional features than what it offers.

    Not a big fan of carrying

  • by hooiberg ( 1789158 ) on Thursday November 05, 2015 @02:13AM (#50868905)
    If you need electronics during running, you should plans your routes through more interesting places, where there is more to see.
    As a runner myself, the only electronics I bring along are two lights.
    You really want to keep an ear open for traffic.
  • ...and try to finish the marathon before the battery dies ! How's that for an incentive ?
  • by kheldan ( 1460303 ) on Thursday November 05, 2015 @03:11AM (#50869005) Journal
    As something of an athlete myself, my advice to your wife is to focus on upgrading her engine, and worry about the bells-and-whistles later. Especially running out on public roads, but out running anywhere in public, you need to be aware of your surroundings, not drowning them out with music blaring in your ears. Furthermore running 26.2 miles requires mental toughness and focus; if you're relying on something external to drown out your personal demons, who are trying to sabotage you, what's going to happen when the thing dies or your earbuds fail? Skip the music. GPS I could go either way on, but if you know the course you're running on, what do you need GPS for? A watch with a chest strap for monitoring heart rate should be all she really needs to get started, they're inexpensive, durable, and will run for months on one set of batteries. If you really want to spend money on your wife being successful at marathoning, invest that money in a professional coach to give her a personalized training plan, monitor her progress, and overall maximize the benefit of the time she spends training.

    ..and no, this wasn't the advice you asked for, but I think it's the advice she needs.
  • My 2 cents (Score:3, Informative)

    by dchrys ( 150697 ) on Thursday November 05, 2015 @04:12AM (#50869151)

    As I run long distances and marathons frequently, this is the gear that I usually have with me:

    - iPod shuffle 4th gen: without touch screen and with real buttons this one is runner's best friend. It had survived rain and sweat drops and its battery lasts for more than 12h of music. Its clip and non-existent weight make it very practical to carry

    - Garmin Forerunner 220 - It's battery lasts 8h (on paper) with the GPS on and I had occasions of 5-6h long runs with it with plenty of battery remaining

    - Samsung SIII Neo - My old android phone, I also carry a spare battery for it. Useful for safety ofcourse and also to support the Forerunner for live tracking, Endomondo, Runtastic and other apps (Ingress !)

    -=dchrys=-

  • I have run a number of marathons. The Sony Smartwatch 3 has great features, supports Bluetooth Smart for pairing with a HR monitor (I strongly recommend Scosche Rhythm+, by the way) and tracking apps, e.g. Endomondo.

    I don't wear headphones or listen to music while running (by the way, race organizers discourage headphones during races). So I want a loud alert for intervals, in other words, I want a device with an external speaker, which the SW3 doesn't have. So I just use a Geonaute 510 tracker watch (el-ch

  • by dcw3 ( 649211 )

    Just an anecdote... During the VA Beach 1/2 Marathon last year, my Garmin inexplicably stopped about 2.5 hrs in. It still had plenty of battery life remaining, and I was able to start it up again, but had to manually join the files once I loaded them to my computer. Same race, same watch, but this year, no such problem.

    As for iPod Nanos, I've been through 3 of them, all dying, likely due to moisture in the armband. I really don't want to carry around something the size of a cell phone.

  • I recommend not wearing any gadgets. They increase your weight, reduce your situational awareness, and increase your time to completion. Many marathons outright ban them and for good reason.
  • Roku. Netflix. A decent tv. Probably your phone, so you don't have to get up to order a pizza. What else do you need?

    Oh wait, not that kind of marathon.

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