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Microsoft Operating Systems Windows

Slashdot Asks: Windows 10 Creators Update Goes Live On April 11, Will You Upgrade? 239

Microsoft said today it will start rolling out Windows 10 Creators Update, the latest major update to its current desktop operating system, starting April 11. The company says Windows 10 Creators Update brings with it a range of new features. Some of the chief ones are:

1. Visual previews of tabs in Microsoft Edge.
2. Edge now has built-in support for ebooks.
3. Microsoft Paint now lets people create models in 3D.
4. Picture-in-Picture mode for videos. Essentially you can now have a small window with video playing on it placed on top of any other application.
5. Night Light: A baked in feature in Windows that will allow you to change the color and tone of display so that it doesn't pain your eyes to look at the screen at night.
6. Dynamic Lock: The feature first requires you to pair your phone or tablet with the computer. Once done, it will automatically log you out everytime you're away from desk (or technically speaking, the device is out of the computer's proximity).
7. Native support for surround sound.
8. Ability to scribble and make notes on Microsoft's Maps app.
9. Game mode: It "ensures" your computer is always maximizing its resources for an optimal gaming experience.
10. Built-in support for mixed reality handsets.

Over the past two years, we have seen numerous instances where Microsoft has been pushing Windows 10 update to customers who have Windows 7 or 8 running on their machines. There are still hundreds of millions of customers who're yet to upgrade from Windows 7, arguing that they either prefer how Windows 7 looks and functions, or (in some cases, and) why fix something when nothing is broken. That said, would you consider upgrading your system to Windows 10 Creators Update?
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Slashdot Asks: Windows 10 Creators Update Goes Live On April 11, Will You Upgrade?

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  • If on WinX; (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:04AM (#54134303)

    Do you have a choice?
    It'll deserve a BIG Thank You M$! - For deploying an update that needlessly shortens my SSD life while adding a ton of bloat, without really fixing any existing issues...

  • by skids ( 119237 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:05AM (#54134305) Homepage

    X11 that is. "Creator's Upsate"? Really? Well that name doesn't *sound* very creative. I'm just saiyan (like Goku).

  • Okay, the Home edition still tries to prevent you from shutting off the crumy updates, and even the pro edition limits your ability to control the OS compared to Windows 7. What good is this decorative entertainment nonsense when the OS controls you. Hopefully people will wake up and get of Windows 10 before the next updates starts telling you what you are allowed to install. That is how bad this OS is. (See class action lawsuit over update mechanism)
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Merk42 ( 1906718 )

      Okay, the Home edition still tries to prevent you from shutting off the crumy updates...

      Good.
      The average Windows user can't be trusted to ever run updates, so their computer ends up getting compromised.

      • by fisted ( 2295862 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:22AM (#54134429)

        The average Windows user will have no idea how to disable updates. What's the point in taking away that possibility from above (should I say "below", given that they know better yet bend over for the clusterfuck windows is?) average windows users?

        • by dontbemad ( 2683011 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @11:28AM (#54134897)
          If you have even the most basic knowledge of Group Policy editing, it takes around 15 seconds to disable updates from auto installing.

          I'm fine with Microsoft forcing its more "basic" users to update. The fact that they didn't do this in the past is THE literal reason why that company still lives with the stigma of being "virus ridden" and "as full of holes as swiss cheese".

          I'll never get some of you guys. When an OS doesn't force the user to update, its a security risk. When an OS does force the user to update, its an affront to freedom and choice. If you don't want to deal with forced updates, either don't use Windows or become enough of a power user to stop the OS from doing it.
          • by fisted ( 2295862 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @12:34PM (#54135417)

            I'll never get some of you guys. When an OS doesn't force the user to update, its a security risk.

            If by 'updates' you mean fixing security issues, then yes.

            When an OS does force the user to update, its an affront to freedom and choice.

            If by 'updates' you mean fixing security issues, then no.

            It is my understanding that the sort of 'updates' we're talking about here, however, is more than 'fixing security issues'. If I were using Windows, I'd be fine with forced security updates, but not with forced addition of random crap and telemetry.

            either don't use Windows

            I'm running pretty much only NetBSD, with the occasional FreeBSD and Linux machines here and there. Doesn't change that i can be curious about the latest drama of the Windows world.

            or become enough of a power user to stop the OS from doing it.

            Seriously, who are you kidding? You can't just "become enough of a power user" to stop a blackbox OS from doing that.
            All you *can* do is a depth-first traversal of the entire GUI, unchecking every checkbox that sounds related. In no way does that mean that you can be sure everything is actually turned off, becuase, you know, software developers don't HAVE to add a checkbox to a GUI to control $feature.

          • by UnknownSoldier ( 67820 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @02:38PM (#54136803)

            > I'll never get some of you guys:
            > * When an OS doesn't force the user to update, its a security risk.
            > * When an OS does force the user to update, its an affront to freedom and choice.

            Because there is MORE then just 2 choices:

            * How many updates NEVER gave _any_ details on _exactly_ what they were doing other then some bullshit generic "Security updates" message.
            * How many updates FORCED the user to migrate to Windows 10?
            * How many updates had NOTHING to do with updates except add spyware? [infoworld.com]
            * How many updates broke WGA [infoworld.com] (Windows Genuine Advantage)?
            * How many updates broke Internet Explorer?

            Who the fuck designs a program where you can only install the latest version??? If Microsoft wanted to pull its head out of their collective ass they could have:

            * Clearly, communicated, in detail, EXACTLY what each and every update fixes.

            But no, they didn't.

            Microsoft has ZERO respect for its users.

            So fuck'em.

          • either don't use Windows or become enough of a power user to stop the OS from doing it.

            Written like a true elitist. Only an ass would require everyone using a common household OS to become a "power user".

          • Many of Microsoft's updates have ADDED security holes. Ie, updates to Outlook that would automatically allow executing programs attached to mail - who would ever trust the security credentials of a company that did that? Most Windows updates are not related to security. Get the security updates, sure, thats great, but you do not need all the crap they push out as updates, not even things listed as "important". Remember how their Get Windows 10 updates caused more problems for users than the average malwa

          • When an OS doesn't force the user to update, its a security risk. When an OS does force the user to update, its an affront to freedom and choice.

            "Force" != "Default choice"

            I'm fine with Microsoft forcing its more "basic" users to update

            The problem here is that even the "basic" users are starting to have way too many problems with the updates, because the updates suck. The solution is to stop fucking up updates, not ramming them down peoples' throats by locking them out of the group policy editor.

            Users aren't stupid. They're not rejecting updates because they want their computer to suck. They're rejecting updates because the very process, results, and frequency of updates is completely out of hand. It's the s

        • by geek ( 5680 )

          The average Windows user will have no idea how to disable updates. What's the point in taking away that possibility from above (should I say "below", given that they know better yet bend over for the clusterfuck windows is?) average windows users?

          Sure they can and will. And if they don't the malware they install will do it for them.

        • The average Windows user will have no idea how to disable updates.

          No the average windows user doesn't understand the process of updates or when to disable them.

          The average windows user will find something that annoys him, will type it into google and will then take shots in the dark to see what fixes his problem, and one of those will be disable windows update. That's it. It won't get enabled again whether it was the cause or not.

          Remember windows updates were a default on Windows XP too, a lot of fucking good that did for the average user who put more effort into disablin

      • by evolutionary ( 933064 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:59AM (#54134689)
        Problem with that is MS Updates sometimes as bad or worse than no update at all. There are at least 3 instances where the update actually compromised or killed the OS. There are also reported incidents where an update was marked as "critical" but had nothing to do with security. Even the experts can't tell if an update is valid, potentially breaks something, or even creates vulnerabilities. (some do). So, even professionals can't tell without a test environment which no user is going to have. But by taking away the choice, MS is free to wreak havoc on "your" OS as well as compromise your data and privacy. That is an overall negative not just for the user, but potentially for the entire Internet community.
        • by Altrag ( 195300 )

          You mean the GWX ("Get Windows 10") nagware wasn't a security fix? But it was marked as critical!

      • The average Windows user can't be trusted to ever run updates, so their computer ends up getting compromised.

        And the average Windows update has a chance of making your computer unusable. That also doesn't factor in updates which add no functional value to the customer but does things like reduce privacy for the customer.

      • But their systems are compromised by the updates, so this is a lose-lose issue?

  • Does it really go live April 11? Or did they mean April 1?
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Clearly the 11 was binary. So it goes live on April 3rd.
  • Well lets see... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:17AM (#54134399)

    1. Visual previews of tabs in Microsoft Edge.

    I don't use Edge.

    2. Edge now has built-in support for ebooks.

    See #1.

    3. Microsoft Paint now lets people create models in 3D.

    If it's anything like Paint was for graphics then most likely I'd use something more robust instead of Paint to make 3d stuff. Assuming I have 3D stuff to make in the first place.

    4. Picture-in-Picture mode for videos. Essentially you can now have a small window with video playing on it placed on top of any other application.

    That sounds annoying.

    5. Night Light: A baked in feature in Windows that will allow you to change the color and tone of display so that it doesn't pain your eyes to look at the screen at night.

    Honestly not sure about this one. My eyes are fine looking at the screen at night.

    6. Dynamic Lock: The feature first requires you to pair your phone or tablet with the computer. Once done, it will automatically log you out everytime you're away from desk (or technically speaking, the device is out of the computer's proximity).

    Just what I always wanted for my computer, another attack vector for breaking in.

    7. Native support for surround sound.

    That's nice, don't have surround sound but I seriously think that's a nice feature.

    8. Ability to scribble and make notes on Microsoft's Maps app.

    I don't use Maps and in fact if I could uninstall it I did or would if I could.

    9. Game mode: It "ensures" your computer is always maximizing its resources for an optimal gaming experience.

    I found it annoying when Windows unexpectedly loaded up things like a session record when I fired up Minecraft one day because "gaming experience". Do not annoy me further please.

    10. Built-in support for mixed reality handsets.

    Like surround sound this is nice but not something I use.

    Over all I have little incentive to update Windows, more incentive to reformat and use another operating system on my only Windows machine left in my collection. The reality however is they will most likely force this update on me one way or another so if it bugs me to much I'll have no more Windows machines "just for certain games" because the operating system those games relies on is far to annoying for me to continue to in that market when better alternatives I'm already running on a gaming laptop I have running Linux are available.

    • 3. Microsoft Paint now lets people create models in 3D.
      If it's anything like Paint was for graphics then most likely I'd use something more robust instead of Paint to make 3d stuff. Assuming I have 3D stuff to make in the first place.

      Before going 3D, if it could at least have the most basic filters for 2D images, like CONTRAST, LUMINOSITY and some easy stuff like auto color adjustment, ans some exotic sepia, rainbow and greyscale color transform, it would already be a good start. The fact is that the features of MSPaint have not changed since what, Windows 3.1?

      • by SirSlud ( 67381 )

        The fact is that the features of MSPaint have not changed since what, Windows 3.1?

        Incorrect.

        And MS Paint isn't for photo editing. It's for quick and dirty painting, which it's fine for.

        • I just looked on Google Images for each version of mspaint since Windows 3.1, and apart from the UI being adapted to each OS, the features have almost remained the same. I understand that it is for "painting", but basic photo editing capabilities would have been a fine addition.

          Back in the days of Win3.1, digital photography barely existed. Now that digital photography is (almost) the only remaining thing and that everyone is using it daily, I think it would be normal for MS to provide some way to basical
    • by jbengt ( 874751 )
      1. Visual previews of tabs in Microsoft Edge. - I'd like to avoid this.
      2. Edge now has built-in support for ebooks. - not intersested
      3. Microsoft Paint now lets people create models in 3D. - wouldn't ever use
      4. Picture-in-Picture mode for videos. Essentially you can now have a small window with video playing on it placed on top of any other application. - might be OK if I used my laptop to watch TV, which I don''t
      5. Night Light: A baked in feature in Windows that will allow you to change the colo
    • 8. Ability to scribble and make notes on Microsoft's Maps app.

      I don't use Maps and in fact if I could uninstall it I did or would if I could.

      Open Powershell as administrator and run this:
      Get-AppxPackage *windowsmaps* | Remove-AppxPackage

      Want to remove any others?

      • Want to remove any others?

        Yes! starting with Candy Crush! Please post a list of the True Names of apps that empowers you to remove them!
        BTW, does this method remove the app permanently...
        or will it just resurrect itself with the next Tuesday update?

        (not a hater... with Classicshell, Win 10 Pro is quite ok. But the unsolicited bloat IS annoying, and with each forced major upgrade I sweat that some software, license, or hardware I depend on is not going to make it... and for what? 3-D in Paint? stuff I can already get with a 3rd-

    • 6. Dynamic Lock: The feature first requires you to pair your phone or tablet with the computer. Once done, it will automatically log you out everytime you're away from desk (or technically speaking, the device is out of the computer's proximity).
      Just what I always wanted for my computer, another attack vector for breaking in.

      I'm curious, how is Dynamic Lock an attack vector?

    • 4. Picture-in-Picture mode for videos. Essentially you can now have a small window with video playing on it placed on top of any other application.

      That sounds annoying.

      It sounds like a killer feature ... that has been part of every media player except for media player itself since about 1997.

    • Don't knock the Night Light thing. It's great. I know this because I've had a program for years that does that.

  • Where's that meme picture...

    None of these features sound good. None of them.

  • win 10 heck no (Score:5, Insightful)

    by banbeans ( 122547 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:21AM (#54134419)

    Not until they totally remove the spyware they infested it with.

  • So no, but I'll enjoy the reporting of the usual doom and mayhem it will generate.

  • by luna69 ( 529007 ) *

    I'll stay with Windows 7 for a while longer. But I won't be installing Windows 10 willingly, if ever.

    Microsoft: "We let you choose how much spying we do on your activities!"
    Users: "Uh...please don't spy on us at all. Like, none."
    Microsoft: "OK, here's some revised settings that don't let you actually turn data collection off! One is called 'Basic'!"
    Users: "..."

  • and maybe not after April 18th, either.
  • by SmaryJerry ( 2759091 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:25AM (#54134447)
    I swear Microsoft always seems to not only not support old versions but actively creates issues to force you to upgrade. On windows 7 just on March 15th they pushed a "security update" to 2010 Microsoft office that basically makes any file with macros in it crash unexpectedly many times a day. I had to roll back the updates on every computer in our office and disable windows updates because we rely heavily on macros. It's so frustrating that things can work fine and they break it. Now we have to think about upgrading to the lastest operating system and Microsoft office which both already changed the way VBA works so transitioning and keeping our existing macros running is going to take many months of work.
    • Just FYI Microsoft issued a patch to fix their broken patch you describe yesterday https://support.microsoft.com/... [microsoft.com]
    • by geek ( 5680 )

      I swear Microsoft always seems to not only not support old versions but actively creates issues to force you to upgrade. On windows 7 just on March 15th they pushed a "security update" to 2010 Microsoft office that basically makes any file with macros in it crash unexpectedly many times a day. I had to roll back the updates on every computer in our office and disable windows updates because we rely heavily on macros. It's so frustrating that things can work fine and they break it. Now we have to think about upgrading to the lastest operating system and Microsoft office which both already changed the way VBA works so transitioning and keeping our existing macros running is going to take many months of work.

      Right I mean most Linux distros are supported for a full 9 months (Fedora) and others for a full 18! How dare Microsoft not support their 7 year old products!

    • The people who need quality patches that have undergone thorough regression testing will likely pay for it.

      "Windows Update Premium Subscription" should delay patches for all products until they are verified correct, and allow the user to schedule the patch runs.

      $200/year, and many would likely pay it.

  • Microsoft Paint now lets people create models in 3D.

    That's as stupid as buying iPhone apps from iTunes or making a voice call from FaceTime.

    • I guess it isn't terribly creative, but complaining about Paint's name is like complaining about Notepad... it'd be more confusing if they renamed it.
  • Will I upgrade? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by bluegutang ( 2814641 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:26AM (#54134453)

    The more relevant question is: will I be upgraded?

  • But not today, or April 11. We have Windows 7 at work, and Windows 10 at the college where I teach. Windows 10 has exactly 0 compelling new features for me. Sadly, our department at work will be upgrading sometime before the fall semester. Can't wait to see what specialized software I run is going to break!
  • Why log me out and not just 'Lock this computer'? This is as stupid as no-choice reboots to install updates.
    • From the article

      Windows Hello can use any paired iPhone, Android or Windows Phone to detect when you step away from your PC or tablet, automatically locking it behind you for an extra measure of security and privacy. This remote lock feature works with smartphones, fitness bands or any device thatâ(TM)s paired to your PC or table

      So it does in fact just lock the computer and not log you out. Whoever wrote the summary obviously screwed up.

  • If my laptop will even finish its current update. For the last while now I turn it on and it starts spinning saying configuring updates 100% complete seemingly indefinitely, it doesn't get to 100% it starts there. (I left it for nearly an hour once and it was still 100% complete) so I kill the power, it turns on again says configuration failed and I'm good to go. The laptop is pretty fucked though and its battery doesn't work. I only use it for videos or streaming xbox otherwise I might look into sorting it
  • by tlambert ( 566799 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @10:42AM (#54134555)

    I am almost positive I will be upgrading.

    Not because I want to, but because Microsoft will "upgrade" my machine behind my back, whether I want to upgrade or not.

    God help us all, if they ever get a zero day on Linux, because then a lot more machines will end up "upgraded" to Windows 10...

  • The summary is a bit unfair in listing a subset of the new features.

    Plenty of articles popped last month on the subject [howtogeek.com].

    I'm upgrading, but then again, I'm not a paranoid, delusional basement dweller who thinks they should stick with one OS (for the record, I run everything from Linux to Windows and a few things in between, like Apple's stuff - whatever is appropriate for the hardware).

    Also, as somebody who has run 2nd generation SSDs for 8+ years without powering them down, I'm not to worried about Microsof

    • "I'm not a paranoid, delusional basement dweller "

      "I don't have an urgent need to hyperbolize everything"

      Do you ever try listening to yourself?

  • I actually rather like Windows 10, have had no problems with it.

  • CREATORS CREATORS CREATORS CREATORS CREATORS!!!!! duuuuhhhhhh.....

    God I so do not miss proprietary shit-ware.

  • 9. Game mode: It "ensures" your computer is always maximizing its resources for an optimal gaming experience.

    Fascinating a "game mode" would be needed to keep system processes from interfering with the operation of games.

    Preoccupying CPU caches with Microsoft P2P networks to facilitate forced updates and constant data collection must be taxing on otherwise idle W10 systems regardless number of available cores.

    • by Altrag ( 195300 )

      It would be nice if "game mode" didn't interfere with the bloody games. No, I don't want to record my fucking game or post it to Facebook or have a damned popup showing up every time I load a program that lets me tell Windows its a game but has no option for "no, this isn't a game and stop freaking asking already."

      See also nVidia's ShadowPlay (which records whether you want it to or not, just in case you change your mind partway through and want to be able to start 30ish seconds before you hit the record b

  • Yes, upgrade from MS Windows to Linux! Use that most of the time, run Windows only in a VM and only if you have to. If it's absolutely necessary, have a computer that boots into Windows - but the more dust said computer collects, the better for you and for the entire world.

    Elsewhere on Slashdot is a story about why Flash died. Too bad it wasn't talking about Windows instead. I had no love for Flash either; but if I got to choose which one of them would be pushing up daisies, Flash blocking browser extension

  • Why is Windows 10 considered an upgrade to anything save, oh, Bob or GEM?

  • I actually just this week stocked up on some Skylake parts, as to avoid a forced upgrade that comes with Kaby Lake. The key issue for me would be: Does the UI still look like the afterbirth from Win 3.1?
     
    By all accounts, the answer is yes. It is utterly beyond me how such a terrible eye-straining flat UI could be launched in this decade.

    • I don't mind the look. Minimal is good. I use Windows 8.1 with some registry tweaks and I far prefer that look to the overly glossy Windows 7 which has so much gloss it's like it's trying to pick up users on a street corner. I prefer OSX even more, gets rid of the pointless borders altogether. The start menu in Windows 10 sucks though, as well as the phone-line apps store and metro UI, but for desktop look I like it.

      Everything else in Windows 10 sucks though.

      Maybe that's part of the problem - the user i

  • by Fencepost ( 107992 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @11:36AM (#54134943) Journal
    The main thing mentioned that I care about is the new screen dimmer, but I've been using f.lux for years.

    "Dynamic Lock" could be very handy (auto-lock when you walk away) and I've been looking into something to do that, but I'm looking at it for a scenario of PCs in exam rooms so pairing all of them to doctors' phones isn't really a viable option.

    Not mentioned in the summary, but possibly important to readers here:

    Improvements to control over updates, such as being able to prevent driver updates.

    Improvements to privacy settings - Maybe not so relevant if you're using O&O ShutUp, but nice to have. Apparently includes the ability to see (and clear) the info that MS has, along with a reduction of the info sent when you're using "Basic" telemetry settings.

    An upgrade to Windows Subsystem for Linux (will be bumped to Ubuntu 16.04 from the current 14.04) and better integration with Windows apps.

    A navigation bar in the registry, which could actually be really handy.

    If you use OneDrive on both a desktop with tons of storage (and everything local) and a laptop with an SSD smaller than what's in your OneDrive, now there will apparently be better behavior for files not local on the smaller system. Currently, you basically just modify in OneDrive Settings which folders are available on each system.
  • by Misagon ( 1135 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @11:39AM (#54134965)

    According to "Barnacules Nerdgasm" on Youtube, who previously worked on Windows at Microsoft, people he know who are still inside have told him that "telemetry" (I.e. spying) will get harder to disable in future updates. Whether all of these will be in this next update or in a future one is hard to say.

    He commented to his own video [youtube.com] with this:

    I've been talking to a few 'insiders' at Microsoft that are also saying that many of the things like App Store and Telemetry are now being hard coded into key services like explorer.exe and critical system services that if stopped will crash the box immediately. The reason for this is obviously to prevent programs like anti-beacon from disabling these services. It's pretty obvious at this point that Microsoft wants the data at any cost and their cover story is bullshit. I'll update you guys when I know more or when the Windows releases are public that contain these changes and we'll do a video on how to create a network bridge between your system and the internet to prevent telemetry from working even with all the services on the box trying to make contact.ï

    • by imidan ( 559239 )

      create a network bridge between your system and the internet to prevent telemetry from working

      This is exactly what I want before I upgrade from Windows 7. I recognize that I'll probably eventually need to upgrade to 10, but I want a hardware solution to stop my OS chatting with its mothership.

  • by Artem Tashkinov ( 764309 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @11:48AM (#54135035)

    1. will allow to completely disable telemetry (or won't include it at all)
    2. will not have any mention of UWP/Metro (right now it's even built into Explorer)
    3. will allow to control updates and Windows Defender
    4. will return Classic Control Panel along with all removed options like Glass, Classic UI, etc.
    5. Will introduce Service packs back.

    Until then Windows 7 is more than good [altervista.org] for me.

    • allow to completely disable telemetry (or won't include it at all)

      Telemetry. How quaint. My ISP is probably now tracking and selling all my Internet usage [slashdot.org] regardless of what OS I'm using.

      • At least your ISP doesn't force you to install a keylogger, alone with voice recording and personal files scanning. Besides you can always "opt out" by using VPN/Opera VPN/Tor. Most people won't do, which is why a lot of websites nowadays employ SSL.
  • For everyday users, they really need to dump Windows 10 Home Edition, replace it with Windows 10 Pro, then just call it Windows 10.
  • I only use it at work. I use Linux at home, and my family uses Win7.

  • by jsepeta ( 412566 ) on Wednesday March 29, 2017 @01:11PM (#54135819) Homepage

    Eventually Microsoft will shovel the Creators' update onto all Windows 10 computers.

  • Not that I wouldn't necessarily want it, but since I have the Windows Update service permanently disabled because it's so incredibly and ridiculously obnoxious and "poorly designed" (for which that phrase alone in this context gives the idea of software design a bad name), I don't think I'll ever get prompted for it.

    I'm still holding out for the day when MS manages to extract their metaphorical head from their ass for just long enough to comprehend that being as obtrusive as humanly possible with pushing up

  • None of those 'upgrades' is enough to get me to download it.
  • So, when the update comes my way in a few more months, with fewer rough edges after the microsoft personel apha tested it, the insiders beta-1 tested it and the home users beta-2 tested it, I'll be glad to be a beta-3 tester for the enterprise guys ;-)

    More seriously, yes, i''l get it, but will not go out of my way to get it on April, or may, or june, or july, or...
    Besides, I use a mac, this is in Bootcamp anyhow.

  • Windows 7 will be my last version of Windows on any computer that I own.

    MS tactics is forcing upgrades to win 10 would have been enough to put me off. However, bundling spyware and adware right in with the OS guaranteed that I would never have win 10. Right now, my employer has win 7 on our work computers but they will probably have little choice but to move to 10. My personal use on windows is pretty much just gaming and a few specialised applications which I can live without.

    Linux has long been my main

  • So obviously, no, I won't be updating. Don't need that level of over the shoulder regardless of the presented bennies.

  • The answer is no.

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