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Submission + - What to do for ongoing education? 1

An anonymous reader writes: Lately, with the volatility of the economy, I have been thinking of expanding my education to reach into other areas related to my career. I have a computer science degree from Purdue and have been employed as a firmware engineer for 10+ years writing C and C++. I like what I do, but to me it seems that most job opportunities are available for people with skills in higher level languages such as ASP,.NET, C#, PHP, Scripting, Web applications and so on. Is it worth going back to school to get this training? I was thinking that a computer information technology degree would fit the bill, but I am concerned that going back to college would require a lot of time wasted doing electives and taking courses that don't get to the "meat" of the learning. What would you do?
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What to do for ongoing education?

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  • Background: I am an adjunct instructor and an IT professional. As such, this is a common discussion topic.

    The education industry, meaning colleges and universities, need a way to "add on" additional skill emphasis to degrees without requiring whole new degrees. I think, instead of detracting from current products (associates, bachelors, masters degrees), this will add revenue abilities from lifetime learning requirements that tech people have.

    For Example:
    BSCS, Purdue University, 1990 BSCS, Advance

Interchangeable parts won't.

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