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Promoting Telecommuting During the Gas Dearth?

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  • There's no shortage of gas - especially with all the sheep in New Zealand.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @05:07AM (#13555463)
    ..this neat conversion company [switch2hydrogen.com]!

    Let's hope there will be more of them soon..
    • Switching to a different medium does not mean that less energy is used. Most energy in the world comes from fossile sources. The fact is that the production of hydrogen is not very energy efficient.
      • Neither's burning gasoline in a four stroke engine using friction braking. On the other hand, if, eventually, we switch over to hydrogen fuel cells and battery/regenerative braking, then we'll be replacing four stroke engines with something much, much, more efficient.

        The key thing about hydrogen is that it's the basis of an alternative energy system, rather than the source of the alternative energy. It enables cars to run on a liquid, easily transportable, easily dispensable, fuel that, instead of being p

        • " enables cars to run on a liquid, easily transportable, easily dispensable, fuel "

          How do you figure? Liquid hydrogen has to be stored at cryogenic temperatures or under extremely high pressure. It also lacks the energy density to make transport by any method besides pipeline very expensive.
        • We have plenty of energy, and will do for many millenia.

          The problem is not about the availability of energy, but the ability to exploit that energy in an efficient way. With fossile fuels we have to put in about 1 unit of energy to get 30 units back. But with many alternative sources of energy the numbers are quite different. Often it is more like putting in 1 unit of energy, and getting back only 1.5 unit over an extended period of time. In some cases we even haven't reached the break-even point. Often a

          • The problem is not about the availability of energy, but the ability to exploit that energy in an efficient way.

            Nope. The problem, as I said, is that we've set ourselves up to limit our use of energy to one particular source. As currently set up, almost every car in the country relies upon fuel derived from crude oil. And there's a limited amount of that.

            With fossile fuels we have to put in about 1 unit of energy to get 30 units back. But with many alternative sources of energy the numbers are quite di

            • Why not ethanol or methane? Both have been used as an alternative fuel for cars. They are much easier to handle then hydrogen, and if I am not mistaken, there are many ways to synthesize these.
        • It's not a solution to the energy crisis because there is no energy crisis. We have plenty of energy, and will do for many millenia. There's an oil crisis, of sorts, and that's what this is a solution to.

          No energy crisis? Is that why the cost of my natural gas has doubled in the last two years?

  • by genzil (663526)
    High prices! Sheesh. You should look at the price we pay in the UK (and have done for a while now).

    How about everybody stop complaining about the high prices and start looking at ways of saving the environment instead. It will work out cheaper in the long run.
    • Exactly. We're not seeing Fuel Strikes [bbc.co.uk] in the US like are happening elsewhere.

      I have worked at home for 6 of the past 10 years, and been able to telecommute for some part of those other 4 years. I am enjoying the limited impact this has on my expenses as compared to years ago when I was driving 62-miles one-way to work. For the last 6 months or so of that (in 2000) I was getting 30-31mpg in my vehicle.

    • Re:High! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by gallen1234 (565989) <(gallen) (at) (whitecraneeducation.com)> on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @07:04AM (#13555882)
      Prices in the UK aren't high because of economics. They're high because an unreasonably high percentage (up to 75%) of the total price comes from taxes.
      • Re:High! (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Burb (620144) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @11:00AM (#13557894)
        The taxation rate in the UK is indeed high, but I am amused at the implication in your post that taxes have nothing to do with economics.
      • Unreasonable is relative. Have the higher prices promoted smart urban live/work growth and mass transit systems?
        • by kraut (2788)
          > Unreasonable is relative. Have the higher prices promoted smart urban live/work growth and mass transit systems?

          No. They've not noticeably reduced suburban sprawl (planning regulations & the "greenbelt" do that to some extent). As for mass transit, the last time it saw the necessary investment was roughly when Queen Victoria was still alive ;(

    • High prices! Sheesh. You should look at the price we pay in the UK (and have done for a while now).

      The reason for your prices is not the same. If we in the US had to pay the huge taxes you do, i'd wager our prices would be even higher.
      • Re:High! (Score:3, Insightful)

        by squiggleslash (241428)
        More interestingly, if those in the UK and EU didn't have to pay the taxes they do today, I'd wager US prices would be even higher too.

        I've wondered for a while if this, ultimately, despite being counter-intuitive, would do more to counter CO2 emissions than continuing to have higher taxes? If it became unaffordable in the US for people to go to work, would the world's largest economy suddenly find it economic to develop alternatives that, over time, would become so much more efficient than gas-based vehi

    • Hear hear. CO2 emmissions taxes stateside would be a good start.
    • ...and look at the cost of a house... property... and a good many other things. How about the monentary values or wages?

      Costs are not directly comparable between countries without factoring in such things... $3/L might actually seem reasonable in a country with where a happy meal costs $15, and the minimum wage is above that...
  • by mikeage (119105) <slashdot@@@mikeage...net> on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @05:16AM (#13555494) Homepage
    "Forget it"
  • by Associate (317603) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @05:22AM (#13555514) Homepage
    Then expect us to make up the difference in the shorter ammount of time we are at work.
  • by Dr.Opveter (806649) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @05:28AM (#13555531)
    I would love to work at home, but my boss prefers to have me in the office. If I'm home there's no way he check if I'm playing a game or something and I guess they prefer to see me slack at the office, since I don't have much to do anyway...
    If I would have a lot of work to do I might actually not want to be doing that at home anyway. I've done that before and I know I have a way of not getting out of my chair until something is finished which tends to shift my eating/sleeping pattern etc.
  • Use a bike (Score:4, Informative)

    by GreatDrok (684119) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @05:37AM (#13555563) Journal
    I've been cycling to work for the last three months and it has been great. Some days I have to use public transport if the weather is really nasty but I am averaging about 80% of my travel by bicycle. Lots of health benefits, zero emissions, very cheap to run. I cover 12 miles per day, some hills but I hardly notice them any more and it only takes me 35 mins each way.

    A quick calculation to show the current price of UK fuel compared with the US:

    $3.00 per US gallon (seems about average)

    £0.92 per UK litre (at my local Asda)

    1 US gallon = 3.79 litres (1 Imperial gallon is 4.54 litres)

    £1 = $1.82

    therefore, UK price is currently $6.35 per US gallon.

    The other day it cost me £5 more to fill my car than it had done three weeks previously when I last filled it prior to a trip to York. I dread to think what people driving big 4x4s are paying when my little 1.6 Alfa Romeo costs £42 to fill.
    • Re:Use a bike (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Dr.Opveter (806649)
      I wish I could bike to work. Fuel even costs more in my country (the Netherlands, I think we're even no.1 on the list).
      Last week it was even 1.50 euro for a litre.
      3.79 * 1.50 euro = 5,685 euro/U.S. gallon
      1 euro = 1.22 U.S. dollars,
      so I payed almost 7 dollars (6,94) for a US gallon.
      I have to refuel my (small) volkswagen car at least once a week, currently I pay 96 dollars to fill it up (55 litres).

      Bleh!
    • Re:Use a bike (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Quarters (18322) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @06:58AM (#13555858)
      I would love to bike to work. I live nine miles from where I work and the commute is essentially a straight shot down a state highway.

      I'll never do it.

      The highway, while straight, level, and well paved, is heavily travelled (to the point of congestion) by annoying suburbanites driving their SUVs and talking on their cell phones instead of paying attention to the road.

      At speed lane changes with no turn signals used, no checks in the mirrors, no looking out the side windows. Stopping short at lights, making right (or left) turns from the wrong lane because they forgot to get into the turn lane, etc... I've seen it all on my daily commute.

      It's dangerous enough in a car. I'd be nuts to try it on a bicycle.

      • How wide is the shoulder on that road?

        Could you take a slightly longer route through residential streets?

        My commute is a wonderful 3 mile bicycle ride and my employer pays me for not using a parking space. I love bicycling to work, even in the rain.
        • Yea... well in Florida, Rain usually = Thunderstorm, and I'm not too keen on riding through those. (we have a great suspension bridge over the freeway that makes my ride one mile, but no way I'm getting up on that thing with electricity arcing out of the sky... give me my nice rolling faraday cage, IC Engine and all on those afternoons)

          I moved to be within bike distance of my office, but it's really only feasable during "dry" season.

          Cooler then anyhow. I'm not real interested in being sweaty when I
        • In some places the shoulder is non existant. I've tried plotting a secondary road route but the roads aren't really conducive to that. The higway is mostly sided by communities and business parks. There aren't any roads that cut through those and go all the way to my destination. I'm guessing the communities lobbied against such roads to prevent the highway traffic from spilling into their neighborhoods.
          • Re:Use a bike (Score:4, Informative)

            by deranged unix nut (20524) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @09:05AM (#13556815) Homepage
            I have had some luck exploring my way through business parks and residential dead end roads. Maps usually don't show them, but there are often walking paths and cutouts that bicyclists can use to connect between sets of dead ends.
            • Tis true. It's worth getting up early and going out for a ride some Saturday or Sunday morning. Take your time and slowly wind your way to work. I'm sure you'll find there are lots of little sidewalks and paths/trails that go between the business parks and residential areas. You may end up taking an extra 1/2 mile detour here or there to connect them. But in the end, you'll probably find out that those parts make the commute that much nicer just because it's so peaceful and serene out there sometimes...
              • Re:Use a bike (Score:2, Informative)

                by RandomJoe (814420)
                I've tried this. Most frustrating 30 miles of biking I ever did! ;)

                I live all of 5 miles from my office. I'd love to ride my bike (and have, two weeks last year and just finished about 3 weeks last month) but the "last mile" is the problem! It's all residential and pleasant until I get right near my office. I have tried every side route I could think of, and can literally see my office building 1/4 mile away across a field from the nearest side road. But between the tall grass, stickers and railroad ri
    • And if you had to commute over six times that distance, like I do?

      I'm pleased a bike works out for you, but it's not practical for everyone. Luckily, I can do my bit for the environment (and my peace of mind) by taking the train to work. Not everyone can do that, either, though. So cars are justified in some circumstances.

      (SUVs are justified in far fewer, of course.)

      • For a while I drove 59 miles each way to a contract position, and most of it was on a rural interstate that explicitly prohibits unmotorized traffic for at least part of the way.

        A bike would have been possible, but impractical.

        Right now, I commute eight miles each way, but the roads in question are (1) lacking shoulders and (2) populated with Atlanta drivers. #2 in particular makes me scared enough to not want to bike. :-)
    • Re:Use a bike (Score:3, Insightful)

      by PhoenixFlare (319467)
      Use a bike

      I've been cycling to work for the last three months and it has been great. Some days I have to use public transport if the weather is really nasty but I am averaging about 80% of my travel by bicycle.

      First of all, I currently drive my car maybe 5 miles a week, as i'm able to use the DC subway and bus system to get to work every day. Worth it in terms of saving on gas/insurance/car wear, but it does mean my commute time is probably at least twice what it would be if I just drove.

      That said, it's gr
    • to work everyday really doesn't have a DAMN thing to do with the TELECOMMUTING question, now does it...

      • doesn't have a DAMN thing to do with the TELECOMMUTING question, now does it...

        I believe the question was "How is your company responding to the current situation?". Telecommuting is one way of dealing with the situation but you do lose the direct interaction with collegues. If you really must be at the office the most environmentally friendly and least reliant on fuel prices is a bicycle. Some companies even give their employees benefits to encourage the use of bicycles.

        The sad thing about all this

  • by FidelCatsro (861135) <fidelcatsro@gmaiQUOTEl.com minus punct> on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @05:41AM (#13555578) Journal
    Obviously some of these are not always applicable , but where they are then they can be very useful . Both for your cash flow and the environment .. not to mention your health in some cases

    1: Walk or cycle to work :get some exercise whilst saving money and the environment

    2: Share a car (Car pool) :not as good as walking , but when you're not in a position to walk to work this can help your cash flow and the environment

    3: public transportation : pretty much the same reasons as sharing a car.

    4: working from home : The story does mention this , It is a great idea . You save the environment and money .

    The Petrol prices here in Germany make me wish I had your Dearth . I always walk to work as if i didn't i would start creating a huge hole in my wallet .

    People should be doing these things anyway , but a huge hike in Oil prices is a great way to kick it off .
    • Walk or cycle to work :get some exercise whilst saving money and the environment

      PEDESTRIANS, BICYCLES, MOTORIZED BICYCLES, NON-MOTORIZED TRAFFIC PROHIBITED

      public transportation : pretty much the same reasons as sharing a car.

      Citlink Buses DO NOT OPERATE at night, on Sundays, or on federal holidays. Besides, sometimes the only affordable real estate is nowhere near a bus route.

  • I ride a bike these days, but I envision a future in which me with my billions will build a castle to house my company and all my employees.

    That would kinda kick ass.
  • How is your company responding to the current situation?

    They're making me stay at the company itself.

  • Sadly we can't all work in computers. But that's half the reason I do.
  • IANAE (I am not an economist)

    <Begin simplistic economic rant>
    This is a problem I have with a market based economy, conservation issues are only addressed during times when people take a personal financial hit. At all other times its "I don't care if my vehical gets 2 gallons to the mile, as I can afford it".

    We should be aware at all times as to how much non renewable resources we are consuming in our day to day lives, and how much of an effect that consumption has on the world around us.

    Note that I a
    • Thing is, we have a market based system and a planned system. Many cities have public transportation, these are planned systems, the roads you drive on are also planned. Unfortunatly the problems is the planners are morons. While one could argue that the planners are effected by market forces, realisticaly they are more effected by votes or their ability to keep their jobs. How can you expect a planned system to ever work when the planners won't do their job.
      • If the planners aren't doing their job then you don't have a planned system, what you have is a flawed implementation of a planned system.

        But that mad me also think, what is the plan that the planners are trying to follow? Using gas prices, are they trying to minimise fuel usage, or minimise fuel cost, or maximise fuel company profits?

        As you said, planners are influenced by things such as voters, and as people are more selfish than not, they would vote to minimise fuel cost before fuel usage. Hence you ha
        • Benevolent dictators generally lead to corruption. Either way if one truly wants to fix the system first one has to look at our federal system and how it can be changed.
          If you want better planning should you increase federal control or increase state/local control. I would argue that a local government can effectivly plan for efficieny of the system better than the federal governement. Of course given commuting as an example of a problem, the local government would never waste its time with buses etc that l
          • Regarding corruption, I think it is more along the lines of those that seek power (for the sake of power) shouldn't be allowed to have it. This goes for communism/dictatorship/democracy. If however they seek power for the genuine benefit of other people, then that is a different story. Unfortunately those sort of people are few and far between.

            I'd agree about less local and more state control, not sure about more/less federal control as I am only newly living here.

            But as to local control I was in Pittsbu
      • Many cities have public transportation, these are planned systems, the roads you drive on are also planned. Unfortunatly the problems is the planners are morons.

        It's not the planners who are morons; they are far smarter than that, because they are able to do their job within the restricted budgetary framework that is imposed by the morons who are voted into office by a greater bunch of morons who don't want too high taxes and who are, for the most part, a bunch of crying NIMBYES.

    • In my view the market based system is a feedback system, while the planned system is a feedforward system.

      More accurate (and descriptive) terms are "reactive" and "proactive".

    • 4) Reducing the idea that a car is an extension of your psyche, so that you don't feel like you have to have your own personal car, and instead can share cars amongst people. This can mean either less cars per household, or more car pooling.

      At the risk of going way off topic (it's never stopped me before) I would just observe that men do whatever they have to do in order to appear cool for women. Most men feel they have to buy a car because most women will think they are losers if they don't.

      Obviously, the
      • I would just observe that men do whatever they have to do in order to appear cool for women. Most men feel they have to buy a car because most women will think they are losers if they don't.
        It's not off-topic, because it explains why people drive gas-guzzlers, which helped cause the gas shortage, which leads to telecommuting to save fuel.

        It's no mystery why the typical gas-guzzler is referred to as a "penis extender" by car salesmen.

    • IMHO, your idea makes good points, but has a problem: most people do not share your level of common sense.

      In your "feedforward" system, you mention that "With a feedforward model, people are organised ahead of time to avoid using excessive amounts of gas prior to the rise in prices, so that when the rise does occur, no-one notices it.". This will then result in the following:
      Joe: Wow, riding my bike sure is great, I don't have to worry about oil prices! And my new hybrid car runs very smooth.
      Bob: But hybrid
    • Reduction of vehicle sizes with an aim for improving fuel economy.

      It's an arms race. What happens in a collision between your compact car and a drunk driver's SUV?

  • At least with telecommuting there is a definite, tangible energy savings, unlike questionable tactics such as extending Daylight Saving Time.

    It would make so much more sense for an "Energy Policy Act" from the US government to provide assistance (via tax breaks or assistance) to companies to lessen the weekly energy consumption of their employees.

    Allow companies to let their employees telecommute one day a week, for example. Or, help companies move to a 4 day week (10 hour work day, not every employee would
    • There are a lot of examples where schedules 10 hour days with rotating days off just do not work. The one that comes to mind immediately is in a development group where all members of the team are vital. A customer is not going to want to wait around an extra day to get an answer about issue X, which is only known by Bob as that is his specialty, when Bob is off.

      If you call Bob and pester him to give you an answer or solution, guess what - it's no longer his day off. The same goes for meetings when you c
  • Pay for my internet connection and get me an equivalently spec'd computer for home that I use for work, and I will work from home.

    As a software developer, I don't need to be in the office much of the time, although it is handy when large issues arrise that require multiple developers to deal with.

    Just don't ask me to invest thousands to setup the same environment at home as I have at work. I try to program at work, but with a much slower computer, less comfortable chair, and only 1 screen ( I use multiple
    • Re:Fine, then (Score:3, Insightful)

      by oni (41625)
      Fine, then pay for my internet connection and get me an equivalently spec'd computer for home that I use for work, and I will work from home.

      Isn't the point of all this that you save money on gas? Why should your employer buy you a computer so that you can save money?? It's like if your employer says, "on friday you can wear jeans to work if you want to but obviously you don't have to." And then you cross your arms and stomp your feet and say, "FINE, THEN YOU BUY ME A PAIR OF JEANS!"

      Uh no, if you don't w
      • There's a difference between the jeans and computer setup examples. Companies tend to like to own what they produce and not have it floating around on someone else's property.

        Most companies with telecommuting options actually provide a computer that is specifically for work (and for no other function) just so they know that the work will be done on, and stored in, a machine that they explicitly own. This prevents "misunderstandings" should the employee "find" some of his previous work on his home computer
  • by deranged unix nut (20524) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @08:00AM (#13556234) Homepage
    I keep reading and hearing complaints that people live too far away from their work to bicycle.

    Well, maybe we don't all need to own a house and have yard. Maybe a condo with a nearby park would also fit your needs and you could live close enough to work to *gasp* walk to work.

    Our idea of the american dream has pushed the market to create huge sprawling cities with inadequate public transportation. How much will that house in the outer suburbs be worth when gasoline is $6/gallon? Could fuel prices go higher than that?

    I am living my american dream. I bicycle to work in 10 minutes, I don't even own a car anymore, and tomorrow I set off on 280 mile bicycle ride that includes a little over 4000 feet of climb in 3 days. Bicycling has given me a new sense of freedom. I lost 40 lbs in the first 4 months of bicycling and have kept it off over the following 6 months...how many SUV drivers would kill for that much weight loss?

    By the way, how much does it cost for you to fill up that tank these days?
    I keep forgetting to look at the gas prices.
    • Maybe a condo with a nearby park would also fit your needs and you could live close enough to work to *gasp* walk to work.

      I consider myself to be very fortunate to have a job that is only 5 miles from where I work. Not only is it a savings on gas, plus wear and tear on the car and a lot of time is freed up for my personal enjoyment rather than spent sitting in a car. Even the auto insurance is lower.

      Living close to work is going to be the new American Dream I think. Right now it is hard when you have a job
    • I wanted to move closer to work but the housing is much more expensive then where I live now (i Live in the city, my employer is in the 'burbs) I live in a small house, and the price difference is 40 - 50k.
    • Some of us can't stand to live that close to other people too. I need my yard and peace and quiet. Of course, I only live 3 miles from work anyways, and drive a little car that makes 35-40 mpg, so I'm doing just fine.

      But the urban life isn't for all of us, I'd go nuts if I had to live in a big city.

    • I would, but it is a bad neighborhood. If I lived in the same city I work in, my neighbors would not allow me to put up a clothsline. I would not be allowed to keep my classic car on blocks in the driveway while I rebuilt the engine in the garrage. In fact I wouldn't be allowed to keep my regular car in the driveway overnight (I wouldn't need it often, but something needs to get me to church or whatever)

      My favorite trees would not be allowed in my yard (even though it is native to the state, while som

  • you insensitive clod!
  • My company's great (Score:3, Interesting)

    by LePrince (604021) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @08:04AM (#13556269)
    They started doing this BEFORE the increases in gas prices... But hey.

    They try to make peolpe carpool more. They encourage this by saying "go ahead, carpool. If someday you're the passenger and the driver has to leave early/later than usual, we'll issue you a cab ticket worth 20$ so you can return home".

    But hey, I work for an environmentally-friendly company... We don't all have the same chance.

  • What do you mean during petrol shortage. Prices won't be going down significantly until demand drops. Here [caltech.edu] is a good explaination of the problems with oil supply and energy exploration more generally.

    What kind of circumstances do you think will cause a drop in demand significant enough to cause petrol prices to drop to the levels they were at the turn of the century?

  • No Other Options (Score:3, Insightful)

    by ShelfWare (457545) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @08:08AM (#13556298)
    Some of the European posters have commented about options such as walking, bicycle, or public transportation. If you live in a metropolis here in USA, then those are viable options.

    I live in one suburb of a small city and work in a different suburb of the small city. My commute is about 25 miles one way, 95% highway, which burns about 1 gallon of fuel.

    Walking or cycling are not options, neither is public transportation (doesn't go where I go).

    The only other option is car pooling, which is nearly impossible with a variable schedule including meetings at other locations that require a drive, picking up kids at day care, etc.

    There's also a growing trend here in the states of people moving further away from cities into rural farming areas.

    So keep in mind that some Americans have vastly different circumstances. That isn't an excuse to drive some monstrosity that gets 10 MPG though.
    • There's also a growing trend here in the states of people moving further away from cities into rural farming areas.

      I might suggest that this trend will reverse if prices continue to rise. You're right that back in the days of cheap oil much of Americas infrastructure was designed around the car, but if the energy crisis continues to escalate (and it seems quite possible) more and more people will relocate or demand better public transport/bike facilities.

      It will be interesting to see just how much worse th
    • Get a better (more economic) car -- mine (GM Celta 1.0) makes 17 km/l (40mi/gallon) in the highway. Or, even better, if you only have one kid, a motorcycle: a Honda 250cc makes 29 km/l (70mi/gallon), which would triple your mileage with the same budget.
  • New Policy (Score:4, Funny)

    by Ratbert42 (452340) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @09:00AM (#13556740)
    How is your company responding to the current situation?

    Because of complaints about the high cost of gas, the CEO asked my manager to draft a work-from-home policy. He's a butt-in-seat manager that doesn't trust anyone. His new policy? You can work from home for a maximum of half of the day.

  • by oni (41625) on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @09:48AM (#13557172) Homepage
    I work at a university which is pretty liberal about this sort of thing, but I can make a recommendation to any private companies that want to encourage it.

    Assign a work-at-home day. If everyone picks their own day then you'll never have a day where everyone is at work.

    Make the work-at-home day Thursday. My experience suggests this is the day that you'll get the most productivity at home. Definitely don't do it on Monday or Friday or work-at-home day will just be a 3-day weekend! (what do you think this is, France?)

    Have an online meeting at about 10:30. Set everyone up with cheap web cams and just spend 30 minutes to an hour on an informal, "here's what we did this week" meeting. Those kinds of informal meetings are good for small groups anyway.

    Use an IM client. It's much better than email or phone calls for quickie questions: "hey bob, tell me again what the param list is."

    Require a followup email at 5:00. Even if it's just to say, "I've been working on this all day but I'm not done yet."

    On the technical side, obviously you're going to need to let employees set up a secure tunnel into a VPN - not the main company network. They need to be able to get to shares on file servers for example, and to hit their machines via remote desktop, but they shouldn't be able to hit shares on their local machines.

    All of that said, I really prefer to be at work. My chair and desk here are more comfortable. I'm also one of the lucky ones who lives close to work and I try to ride my bike at least once a week.
  • by jgerry (14280) * <jason.gerryNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday September 14, 2005 @10:02AM (#13557309) Homepage
    I work for a big telecom that encourages customers to get DSL service so they can telecommute.

    Our own telecommute policy? We're not allowed to telecommute. Yeah, we suck that way.
    • Yeah, I work for a company that makes all types of conferencing hardware for everything from audio to video and document/PC and...

      Our largest customers? Big companies with large conference rooms at the office.

      And our own telecommuting policy: "No."

      Laughable, really.
  • that they're going to close my building and make 1200 people commute an extra 90 miles a day.
  • ... you insensitive clod!
  • I have found that over the past few weeks the local Park-N-Ride usage has skyrocketed. Few motivations are greater than one's own pocketbook. Some of them, presumbaly, will stay when the find out buses can be kind of nice.

    Gas prices are quickly stabilizing though, not sure how much longer the trend will hold.

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