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Syncing Music Players In Linux? 278

Posted by kdawson
from the keeping-it-consistent dept.
Daengbo writes "I recently sold my old laptop to a friend, and she asked me to keep Ubuntu on it rather than installing Windows for her. To help her with the transition, I wrote two intro lessons for her, but we've hit a stumbling block. The iRivier Clix (4GB) she's been using syncs with Windows Media Player. My research shows that the model has both an MTP for the sync and a UMS mode which acts as a mass storage device. Rhythmbox's 'Scan Removable Media' doesn't pick up anything from the USB mass storage device, and although Syncropated claims to support these types of devices, it doesn't find any supported devices. Unless you use an iPod, this appears to be a real weak point in the Linux desktop. Do you sync your mass storage devices and music players? What do you use?"
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Syncing Music Players In Linux?

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  • What do you use? (Score:5, Informative)

    by Rik Sweeney (471717) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:43AM (#19337311) Homepage
    Amarok [kde.org]
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Timesprout (579035)
      This is one of the more polished Linux apps I have found in terms of UI and it works quite well but the resource requirements are brutal. It eats memory, is painfully slow to startup and regularly spikes the processor at 100% even when it's doing nothing.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by beckerist (985855)
        True that. I had a computer with P4 1.7gHz, 768 megs of RAM and kubuntu 6.06. Amarok WAS one of the cleaner programs I'd used on that PC, though I had to regularly close it. If I left it open (like I do with Winamp now) it would use all my computer's resources within a week, causing me to restart more often than I'd wanted to!

        I think the problem lay in the fact that I would just "pause" my music as I'm leaving (and not fully stop it)...it would sit in memory while I was gone...not sure why there was a leak
      • by Fred_A (10934)

        It eats memory, is painfully slow to startup and regularly spikes the processor at 100% even when it's doing nothing.
        I think it's actually browsing your collection to make sure it has it all indexed, wven when it appears to be doing nothing.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by idonthack (883680)

        I don't know what any of you guys are talking about. My instance of Amarok has been running for days now, and processor usage rarely reaches 10%. The only time I ever had CPU issues with it was when I was running badly written extension scripts. Memory usage is around 100MB, which is not totally unexpected considering its complexity, and the fact that I'm playing FLAC files.

        So either you're running it under adverse conditions (read: Gnome desktop) or something is wrong with your installation.

      • Re:What do you use? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by numbski (515011) * <numbskiNO@SPAMhksilver.net> on Thursday May 31, 2007 @05:42PM (#19344397) Homepage Journal
        Amarok is good, but I think he's overlooking the obvious here (well...obvious to anyone who's worked with UMS devices at all....)

        What's happening with his player is that it is either - 1, not recognized by the OS as a UMS (doesn't sound like this...he's able to put files on it and mount it, etc), or 2, the application doesn't recognize the device. If the latter, then what he needs to do is get the USB Vendor ID and Product ID of the player, and send it to the devs so that they can add support for it. If he doesn't mind recompiling from source, he can probably locate the file where the USB identifiers are kept, add them locally, and recompile.

        That said, there are a bunch of devices out there that misrepresent themselves as UMS, but in reality are not. I had a camera like this. It took SmartMedia flash, and had a USB cable that was suppose to allow me to plug the camera in and use it as a card reader. Linux, FreeBSD, and MacOSX immediately attempted to load the UMS driver, as the device claimed this, but then failed miserably. The camera came with a driver disk for Windows, which should have tipped me off right away what was happening. Essentially whomever wrote the firmware for the camera had it identify with that class, even though it wasn't true. It triggers the OS to load the wrong driver, and somehow they worked around that for the Windows driver. If he has that going on, he's pretty much SOL. If he can mount the player and copy files, it's just a matter of getting those two ID's into the hands of the developers, and temporarily modifying his own build until the next version comes out.

        This is why Open Source stuff is cool. Your device isn't supported, but is standards compliant? Add it to the sources and recompile. :)
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Stocktonian (844758)
      Yep, just use Amarok.

      That's why we sell our linux laptops with Kubuntu. The Gnome defaults just don't measure up.

      ---
      http://www.linuxlaptops.eu/ [linuxlaptops.eu] Guaranteed Linux comapatbility
    • Re:What do you use? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by BecomingLumberg (949374) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @11:22AM (#19338033)
      Listen is a good Amarok clone that is GTK (and a believe less of a resource hog). http://www.listen-project.org/ [listen-project.org]
    • Re:What do you use? (Score:5, Informative)

      by rouge86 (608370) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @12:09PM (#19338873)
      iRiver devices come with PlayForSure DRM. You need to update the firmware on the device to get rid of it. Use the UMS version of the firmware. You won't be able to buy music with the device on WMP but you will be able to mount it as a SCSI drive in linux Here is the site [iriveramerica.com] for updating the firmware. BTW, you need at least wmp 10 to update the firmware.
  • by fishdan (569872) * on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:43AM (#19337313) Homepage Journal
    So the obvious thing is you can tell her she's going have to do 'man mount' to find out how to get her music synced. No -- really!

    That joke never gets old...

    Seriously though -- in UMS mode you should be able to mount it as a drive. You'll abviously have to make a script for her, but that's easy enough.

    I love that I know how hot this girl is based on the detail in your help pages for her....
    • by grev (974855) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:47AM (#19337413)
      Mounting won't do it for a lot of players. I have a Samsung YH-925 and although it functions as a UMS, when files are copied to the player they are not indexed, meaning you can't play any music without syncing it through a program like Windows Media Player.
      • I've had two Archos Gmini players and with both, your music is stored in a directory called 'music' on the HDD which is accessible via UMS. There's no reason to do anything else really.

        The Gmini 440 even supports WMA-DRM apparently so it appears they can share the same space with user files.
        • I have an old MM jukebox by Archos. I'd still use it except the battery is toast.
          I really liked their way of doing it, just use a folder tree, simple, easy.
          -nB
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by bzipitidoo (647217)

        I also have a Samsung. It's a Samsung Yepp (YP-U2J I think-- I know the 'U' is in there and think 'U' stands for US). I got it because that was the only one I could find locally that can do Ogg Vorbis. And that only after flashing the player with a European ROM. (Details on how to flash the Yepp are here [xiph.org].) The flash was also necessary to get it to behave like a USB memory stick. Without that ROM update, I could not move files (Ogg Vorbis or MP3 or whatever) on and off it just like it was a plain old f

      • The Sansa players I've tried out are able (more or less) to update their internal database.

        Connect the device to the computer, it is mounted automatically and Nautilus pops up a file browser window.

        Drag your directories containing your MP3 files over to the window representing the device's Music or Audio (or whatever it's called) directory.

        Unmount the device and unplug it; the device displays some message like "rebuilding database" and if you're lucky everything works.

        Beef

    • by wiggles (30088) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:55AM (#19337591)
      My thoughts exactly.

      It's obvious that this girl is interested -- otherwise, why else would she switch to Ubuntu?

      Advice to the geek who posted this: This is not about the OS or her mp3 player or whatever. This is about her wanting to get with you. That's why she kept Ubuntu, because she wants to show you she's open to the things you like. She could give a rat's ass what OS she uses otherwise.

      Go get some.
      • by sYkSh0n3 (722238) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @11:21AM (#19338021) Journal
        Advice to the geek who posted this: This is not about the OS or her mp3 player or whatever. This is about her wanting to get with you. That's why she kept Ubuntu, because she wants to show you she's open to the things you like. She could give a rat's ass what OS she uses otherwise.

        Slashdot: Relationship advice from my mother's basement, next caller please.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by mcpkaaos (449561)
        The only thing scarier than getting dating advice on Slashdot is that it's actually good advice.

        Listen to Wiggles. Go get some.
      • It's obvious that this girl is interested -- otherwise, why else would she switch to Ubuntu?...Go get some.

        Maybe one of us should write a nice graphical lesson for him on blogspot.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Jesus, you people are ridiculous.

        Lesson: If someone is interested, they will do overt, flirty things, unless they're a shy and insecure mess, which you want nothing to do with even if you're one too. Ordering the same type of soft drink is not a declaration of love.

      • by scribblej (195445)
        So when my ex and I parted ways, and she asked me to leave her a PC with Linux on it... that meant she wanted us to get back together? Doubtful.

        Could it be that some girls actually prefer linux for the same reasons we guys do?

        I've never switched operating systems to bag a girl.

        • by GundamFan (848341)
          Yes, but I bet if that was all it took to seal the deal you would be installing a new OS right now. ;-)
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by QCompson (675963)
        It's obvious that this girl is interested -- otherwise, why else would she switch to Ubuntu?

        Is this an admission that linux is so bad that someone must have an ulterior motive to want to use it?
  • by bssteph (967858) * on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:43AM (#19337321) Homepage
    My experience with iRivers is a bit old (it's before there was a libmtp), but here goes.

    libmtp should work, in the normal "well, it's supposed to work" sense, (as listed at http://libmtp.sourceforge.net/index.php?page=compa tibility [sourceforge.net]) but note I've never used that model. The sparse Syncropated page doesn't say if it actually *uses* libmtp, and in fact, I can't see any mention of MTP on their website; it only mentions mass storage.

    My iRiver required some incantation when turning on the device to put it into mass storage mode, I would assume this is still the case. I think you had to hold stop while turning it on, but it's been so long and it was so immediately frustrating that I've purged that experience from my brain. It could have been anything.

    Since this is an Ask article... I use an iAudio X5 (http://www.cowonglobal.com/product/product_X5_fea ture.php). The mother company is Korean, so the website and docs can be a bit funny with the English at times, but otherwise it's a great product. Rockbox (http://www.rockbox.org/) is a safe firmware replacement, and it also, well, rocks. In either firmware, the device is a simple mass storage device (with no funny business other than an obnoxious adapter necessary for USB), and KDE ([insert dig on Gnome]) picks it up immediately.

    For actually syncing, I'm a junkie for simplicity: I use rsync and a directory full of symlinks to the music I want.
    • by euxneks (516538)

      Since this is an Ask article... I use an iAudio X5 (http://www.cowonglobal.com/product/product_X5_fea ture.php). The mother company is Korean, so the website and docs can be a bit funny with the English at times, but otherwise it's a great product. Rockbox (http://www.rockbox.org/) is a safe firmware replacement, and it also, well, rocks. In either firmware, the device is a simple mass storage device (with no funny business other than an obnoxious adapter necessary for USB), and KDE ([insert dig on Gnome])

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:44AM (#19337337)
    Write your own Driver you n00b!
    Seriously though.
  • AmaroK. (Score:5, Informative)

    by MoOsEb0y (2177) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:44AM (#19337357)
    I use AmaroK. It works with my 4g iPod and my Blackberry Pearl. It will sync any generic mass storage device also. I'd give it a try.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by GrueMaster (579195)
      I also use Amarok, and the one irritating feature is that every storage device I plug in to the usb port gets picked up by Amarok (it pops up a screen asking if it should sync music). I have 3 iRirver IFP-79x series mp3/ogg players, two are using their IFP firmware, the third is using a UMS firmware. All three work perfectly with Amarok.
  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn.gmail@com> on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:45AM (#19337361) Journal
    ... this [sourceforge.net] doesn't work?

    From that project:

    Unless otherwise noted, projects support all iRiver iFP devices. Users have reported successfully accessing models iFP-1xx,3xx,5xx,7xx,8xx,9xx and N10. We don't anticipate difficulty supporting future models.

    (Note: iRiver offers 'UMS' firmware for some iFP models. Devices running UMS firmware are compatible with generic USB Mass Storage drivers, and do not need any of the drivers mentioned here.)
    Personally, (most) MP3 players I've hooked up to Linux through a USB have been recognized as just plain old drives. You put the MP3 in the right folder (sometimes takes testing) and there it is, ready to play.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by timeOday (582209)
      Yes. Here's how I configured my laptop to automatically synchronize my mp3 player with my linux laptop. I just plug the player to the laptop usb port, and viola, moments later it's done. I already know this is going to bring heckles from the gui-only crowd, but it really is extremely convenient for me and it might be useful to some of you. You'll have to change the "model" to match your own player, and the music directories on your computer and mp3 player.

      # /etc/udev/rules.d/99-IAUDI
      • by treeves (963993)
        I just plug the player to the laptop usb port, and viola, moments later it's done.

        Well that explains it. If you're only listening to viola music, it's not going to take very long. There's just not much music in the viola repertoire. ;-)

    • by Envy Life (993972)

      Use rsync.

      I had the same thought going into this. I have an iRiver H320 that works like a mass storage device and the simplicity of that makes this whole thread dumbfounding. A quick search brought up this informative article Liberate Portable Music Players: UMS, MTP, and Platform-Agnostic Drag-and-Drop Music Listening [createdigitalmusic.com]

  • Syncroprated! is listed as 'pre-Alpha' on garage.maemo.org. So I would imagine that it might have problems. But, it is written Python, so it should be fairly easy to debug the problem if you're a developer. If not, well, you'll have to wait for the app to become a bit more mature. Since I'm a Python developer, I think I'll download it and have a look at the code. It looks like a neat program to spend some time with.

    BTW--Personally, I just use Nautilus to sync up my Creative Labs Zen Nano player.
  • My iRiver H320 is seen by Linux distros as a MSC, but if I recall correctly, later models like your Clix dropped that functionality when iRiver got in bed with Microsoft and their DRM. You'll probably find more info on http://www.misticriver.net/ [misticriver.net] .
  • Try looking on... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Zwack (27039) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:50AM (#19337483) Homepage Journal
    Anything but Ipod [anythingbutipod.com] The forums are very helpful...

    Some people in the Sandisk Sansa E200 Linux forum have run MTP Mode on Linux...

    Z.

  • by GRW (63655) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:50AM (#19337485) Homepage Journal
    A quick Google search got me this: Using the irivier Clix on Linux [clixhere.net]
  • Sounds like your device may not be connecting correctly. My iAudio X5 shows up the same as a USB flash drive does, and KDE asks me whether I want to mount it automatically. From there, I can use a GUI like konqueror (or, as others will mention, Amarok). Typically, though, I just use the command line.

    For a while I synced podcasts with rsync in a small script which I linked from a KDE menu:

    SOURCE=/path/to/podcasts/
    DEST=/path/to/player/podcasts/
    rsync -av $SOURCE $TARGET

    The same could easily be done for a di
    • by proxima (165692)
      Whoops: s/TARGET/DEST/

    • My GF was trying to get use her X5 under Ubuntu unsuccessfully. I took out a short USB extension cable which she used to access a spare USB port on the back of the machine - suddenly it worked fine.

      Make sure you are using only the cable that came with the device.

  • I use a Sansa m240 (or 230 - I forget). Anyway, it has the really nice quality that you can just dump a bunch of MP3 files onto it, and it will look at the id3 tags (artist, album, etc.) to automatically organize the songs. This is nice because any Linux software can just treat it as a plain old USB Mass Storage device, but I still get nicely categorized MP3s when I use the Sansa.

    So the Sansa works pretty well, but there's one annoying problem. I use Amarok to get podcasts and to transfer them to the Sans
    • If I'm not mistaken (I'm primarily a Banshee user, but used Amarok in the past), there should be an option somewhere in Amarok to tell it where to put your music and podcasts. Just make sure that's set (for the Sansa, it's /media/Sansa c250*/MUSIC) and you should be good.

      *Where it mounts depends on your desktop. In GNOME, it's /media/volume_name (Sansa c250 in my case, probably Sansa m2x0 in yours), and in KDE it's usually /media/sdx1, x being a letter a thru z
  • by flynt (248848) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:53AM (#19337537)
    From the bottom of the first tutorial...

    Cassandra said...

            this is awesome Dan thanks!! you OBVIOUSLY have way too much time on your hands...lol but i'm glad to benefit from it!

    In other words, DENIED! Sorry, man, we've all been there.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by danpsmith (922127)

      Cassandra said... this is awesome Dan thanks!! you OBVIOUSLY have way too much time on your hands...lol but i'm glad to benefit from it! In other words, DENIED! Sorry, man, we've all been there.

      Yep, it's good that you have time on your hands, cuz you are gonna both need that time and your hands, most importantly.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Cutie Pi (588366)
      In other words, DENIED! Sorry, man, we've all been there.

      My thoughts exactly.

      As a woman, the initial feeling I got from the story is that this guy somehow persuaded this girl (who's level of friendship is probably not reciprocal) to use Ubuntu instead of Windows. That gives him an opportunity to continue the (somewhat desperate) interaction past the point of sale. A hint to geeks out there: Girls get scared when you start going out of your way to be "friendly" or "nice". Guys think the girl will be swept of
  • Of course Amarok [kde.org]. It supports many portable devices [kde.org]. Including UMS and MTP
  • I use my Palm Tungsten T and a non-free player called pTunes and a 1GB SD Card to store my music. I love it because I use my PDA heavily still *and* it plays my music. I'd hate to have a separate music player that only did that one thing.

    And since the music is stored as regular ol' .ogg files on the SD card, getting them on and off is easy with GNU/Linux.
  • iRiver Howto (Score:3, Informative)

    by NullProg (70833) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:56AM (#19337603) Homepage Journal
    http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_iRiver [gentoo-wiki.com]

    Enjoy,
  • My solution (Score:5, Insightful)

    by JustNiz (692889) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @10:56AM (#19337613)
    I buy players wisely first. I make a point of researching beforehand and only buy players that:

    1) Appear as a generic storage device when plugged into USB and doesn't require drivers or other software to be installed on your PC.
    ( this gets around any Windows-only and most DRM limitations, and also means I can use it as portable storage for other files).

    2) Supports ogg ( and FLAC if possible )

    3) Doesn't contain DRM
    • My wife gifted me with a 4 GB Sansa m200 this Christmas. It has both modes (MTP and whatever the other one is called), video, radio, recording, etc. Up to 8 GB storage. I have no interest in video (bad eyes), radio or anything other than it's music capabilities. And whether or not it worked with Linux.

      As expected, it's mounted as a storage drive when plugged into the USB port. I'm not so anal that I have to sync stuff (I have too much music and am rarely home these days), so I just drag and drop whatever
    • by Se7enLC (714730)
      So that narrows your list down to zero. Makes it easy to pick.
    • by pecosdave (536896)
      You just described an IRiver.

      Sure the IRiver may need to be flashed to get the right storage type. Almost all of them support Ogg/Vorbis except for a few models introduced before the judge smacked MS down over their plays for sure forbidding support of non-MS supported file types.

      With the exception of their cowering in the corner when MS said do it this way, I respect IRiver products for that reason. Only the Neuros ranks higher in feel good penguin points.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ErroneousBee (611028)

      Ditto that.

      I view ogg support as a clue that the designers of the device have given some thought to what the device should be capable of, and arnt just ticking the boxes that marketing want ticked.

      Other clues are:

      • Battery life. In particular, lying about it. A sign that the company is dishonest, and have lied about other features.
      • No products in the lineup that take AAA or AA batteries. A sign that designers only develop features suggested by marketing.
      • Proprietary connectors. Unless theres some goo
  • Seeing it appears you are using Ubuntu, I'll give you instructions for that.

    Open a bug in Launchpad (http://launchpad.net). Place the name of the device and output from lsusb and lshw when the device is plugged in.

    Most likely the device did not declare itself as a DAP (Digital Audio Player) in HAL. It's a simple configuration file change if you want to make it yourself as well.

    I had to get a similar change in for my Samsung DAP.
  • I hook it up to the computer and let it auto mount. If I need to do a full resync I delete the info on the usb drive, and drag my music onto drive. Usually I just drag the music to it and let it only add what is new. I manage my 30GB IAudio this way.
  • 5G iPod support stinks for me in Linux as well. I love my ability to rip any MP3s from an iPod with KDE by typing "ipod:/" and having everything sorted nicely. On the other hand, synching is terribly broken. Last night I tried using both the ipod:/ kioslave AND Amarok (which probably uses the ipod kioslave) with mostly poor results. 16GB of music was copied to my device, but only 350 of my 2500 songs "registered" on the iPod. The rest were in the appropriate folders, but the iPod stated 15GB of its dat
  • Amarok again (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Apreche (239272) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @11:10AM (#19337867) Homepage Journal
    I don't use KDE, but I use Amarok. Honestly, it is the only media player on Linux worth anything. Banshee and others look fine at first, but you will realize they are unstable pieces of junk if you try to add more than 50 songs to the library. Also, if you use an iPod, you can get it to work with Amarok or other Linux apps quite easily. However, the experience will never be as smooth as iTunes. This is a serious problem. This is why even though I run Linux on all my machines, I still use an iPod with a Mac mini for podcast listening. There simply isn't any other solution that works as smoothly.
    • How large of a music library are you working with? I've got ~54,000 songs (around 350gb), and Amarok is a pain in the ass. Every time I exit Amarok or restart my computer, every time I load it back up it needs to rebuild it's playlist, which takes 7-8 minutes with a library that big (and this is a 500gb SATA drive on an Athlon 64 3200 with 1.5gb RAM). While it's playing, every few minutes the computer will slow to a crawl for about 10 seconds, presumably while Amarok finds and caches the next song to pla
      • by dr bacardi (48590)
        It shouldn't rescan every time you start it... try this:

        Settings -> Configure Amarok -> Collection -> [ ] Watch folders for changes.

        With that cleared it shouldn't try to rescan each time - if you do add/delete/change some songs, you can hit Tools -> Rescan Collection (which does take a while).
        • by Goeland86 (741690)
          Even if you do that, Amarok's got serious speed issues with too large libraries. I've got around 30k songs (~50 GB), and it does exactly as said above, and then some. I lose keyboard focus occasionally while using the win+x win+b shortcuts, and Amarok doesn't act upon them. Then I have to quit amarok to be able to type anything.
          I switched from the SQListe db to mysql, and that helped with the playlist/library load times, but not the other issues. Instead of adding new featuresI don't use any from scripts),
  • It seems to me that this is a weakness in your hardware device (not properly supporting the mass-storage device standards) more so than that of Linux. Not that that functionally helps -you- all that much, but blame where blame is due.
  • PCI fm transmitter. $5 stereo at a yardsale. Central music for your whole house. Google "PCI-MAX 2005".
  • I have a Sansa e130... it has only 521MB, and shows as USB storage, so I don't really had much trouble copying my music to it using nothing but the file manager...

    But, I do miss some features that both iTunes and WMP have... Such as the option to downsample the music as it syncs with the device, and the iTunes' "AutoFill" feature that just fills the iPod with a random selection from your highest rated songs.

    Also, I'd like to be able to create playlists with a size limit... so I know it will always fit insid
    • What you need to do is use your favorite text editor (if you don't have a favorite, use "Text Editor" in GNOME, or "Kate" in KDE) to make a file called .is_audio_player . Since you have a Sansa, you'll be able to use the same file I have, which is below for your cut-and-pasting pleasure

      audio_folders=MUSIC/,RECORDINGS/
      folder_depth=2
      output_formats=audio/x-ms-wma,audio/mpeg

      Just put those three lines in the file, save it to the root of your player. When you pull it up in Banshee (and probably Amarok), it will
  • If you've got automount running, UMS devices should just magically appear as storage when plugged in. Works fine in Suse 10.1, anyway. For MTP devices, libmtp [sourceforge.net] works fine. I just got a Samsung YP-T9 and replaced the MTP firmware with UMS firmware by transferring it with mtp-sendfile from libmtp. (There's also mtpfs [adebenham.com] which is supposed to make an MTP device look like a file system. I haven't tried it, it uses FUSE (user-space filesystem) which I haven't got installed at the moment and libmtp did the job.)
  • by mrsbrisby (60242) on Thursday May 31, 2007 @11:47AM (#19338457) Homepage

    Unless you use an iPod, this appears to be a real weak point in the Linux desktop.
    iRiver doesn't work very well on a Macintosh either, so I bet you consider it a weak point in the Macintosh desktop as well.

    How about this: if iRiver doesn't work in Linux, complain to iRiver.

    With Linux, you could also fix the problem yourself. You could also pay someone to fix the problem. If the iRiver is popular enough, you could also wait and someone else will fix it for you.

    With Windows, you don't have those options, so I consider that a weak point in the Windows desktop.
    • Yet again someone has realized that if everyone used linux, then no one would want to switch to windows.
    • Unless you use an iPod, this appears to be a real weak point in the Linux desktop.

      iRiver doesn't work very well on a Macintosh either, so I bet you consider it a weak point in the Macintosh desktop as well.

      How about this: if iRiver doesn't work in Linux, complain to iRiver.

      The difference is that none of these manufacturers of music players are seeking to support Linux as they do other OSes - we as a community have taken on that yoke ourselves for now - and so, as a result, if a particular player doesn't play well with Linux, it is a failure of those who have been trying to improve support for the players on Linux. It's fine to say that companies should provide Linux support for their hardware - but generally that just doesn't happen. If you want to use Linux you need to ac

  • OK, I am using a Creative Zen with Ubuntu and it mounts like an USB stick just fine.
    However, I'd not call this syncing. Usually, I have a growing collection of music or podcasts on my harddisk and I want to e.g. copy the new ones to the mp3 player and remove the ones I have already listened to on my player or even in my collection.

    Tracking what I have already listened to and using this information for archiving, deleting, copying etc. of tracks seems like the obvious and natural thing to do, but I havent fi
    • Ok, use the GNOME text editor, paste the following three lines in:

      audio_folders=MUSIC/,RECORDINGS/
      folder_depth=2
      output_formats=audio/x-ms-wma,audio/mpeg

      Save as .is_audio_player in the root of your Zen. Start up Banshee (and use Add/Remove Programs to install it if you don't have it), and it should recognize it.
  • my little creative has never given me a problem with linux (debian etch)
  • HTH

     
  • by Doc Ruby (173196)
    I use a SonyEricsson K750 phone as my music player - it's a Flash walkman, with 1GB MemoryStick, Bluetooth and USB connection to my Ubuntu (GNOME) PC.

    How do I sync not just the K750's music/image/video folders (which appear as USB drives), but also its calendar, contacts and email with desktop Evolution?
  • I have a U10 (512K), I think it's the predecessor of yours. Originally we were screwed and there was only an MTP version in the U.S. they've since (due to many complaints) added a USB version of the firmware. Once installed you still have to go through the pain of running a program called easypmp after you copy files to it in order to get the indexing to work correctly. I have no idea if your model has a USB version of the firmware.

    I bought mine originally because it was one of the few players that can p
  • Banshee [banshee-project.org] has an interface very similar to Rhythmbox, but Guide/DAPs/MTP">uses libmtp [banshee-project.org] to support many more digital audio players. I find the Amarok interface a bit cluttered, and it's a KDE app anyway. Something like Gnomad2 would not be as well-integrated with your music library as Banshee. Give it a try.
  • Several of the devices in the Clix line, including the U10 (which I have), can be upgraded to use alternate firmware - to use it as a mass storage device. (But to rebuild the playlists, you'll need EasyPMP [slashdot.org].)

    Barring that, I have to confess I did run into trouble syncing using MTP through amaroK. It worked, but it was horribly unreliable. The whole setup reeks.

  • I have Ubuntu installed on a few machines around here, and have tried various software packages with various music players, and I can honestly say that while I love linux, stuff like this doesn't work as well as it could if the hardware companies started supporting their devices in Linux.

    Although Linux is getting there in terms of usability as a corporate or power-user's desktop, it's still a little out of reach of the common man.

    I'm sure in a couple more years, it'll be there.

Nothing is more admirable than the fortitude with which millionaires tolerate the disadvantages of their wealth. -- Nero Wolfe

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