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Ask Slashdot: Wiring Home Furniture? 235

Posted by timothy
from the for-a-couch-that-seats-1 dept.
b1tbkt writes "So it seems that furniture manufacturers have not yet acknowledged the realities of modern life. Kitchen tables could benefit greatly from built-in concealable receptacles. Even more obvious is the need for electrical wiring in couches and coffee tables. I realize that there are safety (fire) concerns but as it stands most families that I know already have power cords for laptops, tables and phones draped over, under and through their couches at any given point. If someone wanted to wire their furniture with AC or some type of standardized LV DC system, what are some dangers to watch for and what, if any, specialized hardware exists for the purpose?"
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Ask Slashdot: Wiring Home Furniture?

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  • Easy (Score:5, Informative)

    by genka (148122) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:16PM (#43771063) Homepage Journal
    Google "countertop pop up receptacle" and you'll find many choices.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Google "countertop pop up receptacle" and you'll find many choices.

      Too bad the top 5 results are for link farm crap, and the sixth is for this very article...

      Then again, I included the quotes. Without them, the query is much more fruitful.

      • Re:Easy (Score:5, Funny)

        by davester666 (731373) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:34PM (#43771151) Journal

        Even better with safesearch turned off!

      • by TWX (665546)
        Then try looking at high voltage manufacturers and at conference room furniture. Leviton, Legrand, and Hubbell all make electrical devices meant for installation in furniture.

        I also suggest visiting your local college or university library. They're probably already using this stuff, and will have solutions for both power and data in-place. Take a picture of what you like and look for it on those manufacturers' product catalogs.
      • by ArhcAngel (247594)
        That's a nice concept. But I would like to see what Legrand [legrand.us] would come up with.
      • Re: Easy (Score:5, Informative)

        by ozmanjusri (601766) <aussie_bob@@@hotmail...com> on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:45AM (#43771413) Journal

        Or walk around an IKEA. There's plenty of existing furniture that does the job.

      • by Fjandr (66656)

        Mockett has been producing products like that for years. Not identical, but designed to be built into furniture.

      • Re: Easy (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Sqr(twg) (2126054) on Monday May 20, 2013 @02:43AM (#43771729)

        I use a similar, but cheaper, soulution. I bought ordinary power strips that have little holes in both ends (for hanging from hooks, etc). Then I attached them with screws to the underside of my desk and kitchen worktable. There, they are always within reach, while out of sight and safe from spilled liquids.

      • by ryanov (193048)

        Was going to post that link. It's a friend of a friend's project. It doesn't perfectly solve the problem, but it's getting there.

    • by IICV (652597)

      Those would be terrible in practice though - crud would accumulate in the ridges, and it would get in the way when you want to do something wherever it is.

      Flush ones would be the way to go.

      • Re:Easy (Score:5, Informative)

        by JWSmythe (446288) <jwsmythe@jwsmyt h e . com> on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:22AM (#43771325) Homepage Journal

        Counter top outlets in general are a bad idea.. If they're on the surface, they're bound to get something down in them.

        Every kitchen I've seen has plenty of outlets along the walls, and some on the vertical side of cabinets...

        As for sitting furniture, it's an amazingly bad idea. I'm just picturing a couch.. Kids spilling drinks. The dog pissing on it. Toddlers finding amazing new places to stick metal objects. Hell, drunk friends spilling drinks on them while watching football or in the case of this audience, playing a heated game of D&D.

        If there isn't a wall outlet close enough to where you (he) wants them, have one installed. Contractors are more than happy to install anything you want within the guidelines of local building codes.

        For the furniture manufacturers, they become stupid additions to their line. If they sell internationally, they'd need to offer all the different outlets. If the consumer chooses not to use them, now the customers have the annoyance of dead outlets.

        For movers, they no longer are just skilled at moving heavy objects from Point A to Point B, they have to be electricians. That's assuming they're to be hard wired, and not just plugged in somewhere.

        And never leave it to the consumer to consider the total power load on a circuit, they'll always get it wrong.. I can just imagine an entire livingroom with a couch, loveseat, and other assorted chairs, all plugged into one outlet strip on one socket, with god knows what plugged into every outlet. They already fuck it up bad enough with chained outlet strips on poorly designed home wiring..

        When we have some extra cash to bring a contractor in, we're going to have a good bit of our home rewired. Despite a couple dozen circuit breakers in the box, half the house is on one circuit. At least we're aware of it, and are careful not to overload it. As I've found over the years, this is normal. It's like the construction crew waits for the inspector to sign off on the electrical, and then throws everything else on one long circuit.

        • Re:Easy (Score:5, Funny)

          by icebike (68054) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:31AM (#43771359)

          As for sitting furniture, it's an amazingly bad idea. I'm just picturing a couch.. Kids spilling drinks. The dog pissing on it.

          The kids will never learn, but I wager the dog won't piss on it more than once.

        • by kilodelta (843627)
          Well - then you just build a GFCI into the thing and call it a day.

          Personally I'd think a 20VDC outlet would satisfy power needs for most laptops out there. Or if you wanted to be really safe, require laptops to run on 5VDC. Then you could just use a USB style charger. Granted you'd have to up the current limit.
        • Yes, and that's why they got taken out of the electrical code a long time ago.

          That's why outlets are supposed to be every six feet, so you're not running cords under all the furniture.

          • Re:Easy (Score:5, Funny)

            by CyberTech (141565) on Monday May 20, 2013 @01:31AM (#43771541)

            Outlets are supposed to be every 12 feet, not 6 -- that's the same "thinko" i did while building (self) my house. The code actually says no more than 6 feet along any wall (i think the wall has to be 4 feet or longer) to a receptacle. This has the goal of making appliances with 6 foot cords work from any point along the wall.

            When I built my house, I was frustrated with my previous 1960's house that had 2 receptacles per room. I said, hell with it, code says 6 feet, I'll make it 4. Note that thinking CORRECTLY, that would have made it 8 feet between outlets.

            It wasn't until I had run wire and boxes to 3 rooms that I realized I'd been wiring for 4 feet between boxes. I laughed my ass off and said fuck it, wired the entire house that way... 115 receptacles later, I was done :)

            AND THERE'S STILL SPOTS I WISH I HAD A RECEPTACLE AT! :)

            • Re:Easy (Score:4, Interesting)

              by tlambert (566799) on Monday May 20, 2013 @04:20AM (#43771973)

              AND THERE'S STILL SPOTS I WISH I HAD A RECEPTACLE AT! :)

              This is why you run wires in conduit at a uniform height in every wall: knock a hole at the right height, put in a new outlet. You may have to pull new wires to get sufficient length to make the connection, but you can pull them in from whatever's on the other end.

              The only thing you have to worry about, practically, is amperage load per line, so you don't end up with too many outlets on a single set of wires.

              This is similar to the idea that the streets should have utility tunnels, rather than buried pipes, so that you can run new cables, fiber optics, waveguides, or whatever technology we haven't thought up yet, without tearing the streets to crap. There are new subdivisions which have this type of infrastructure, but cities are generally too stupid to do public utility reworks this way (or too smart; union payola?) since if you are trenching and cementing anyway, the biggest cost is in the excavation, not the materials. Redwood City, California is actually doing this type of work right now for access to the light rail, and it's the right way to do it for a 25% additional marginal cost.

              • by Ly4 (2353328)

                ... run wires in conduit at a uniform height in every wall ...

                OK, I'm confused. Is the conduit running horizontally through the wall? And then you reach through the new hole in the wall to tee into the conduit?

                I'm not aware of anything UL listed / permitted by code that works that way.

                • by tlambert (566799)

                  ... run wires in conduit at a uniform height in every wall ...

                  OK, I'm confused. Is the conduit running horizontally through the wall? And then you reach through the new hole in the wall to tee into the conduit?

                  I'm not aware of anything UL listed / permitted by code that works that way.

                  No, you:

                  1: Cut the conduit to run it into the outlet box
                  2: Pull new Romex from the endpoint box, and use a portion of the wire, using the existing Romex for the pull.
                  3. This gives you enough wire on both sides to go into the outlet box. You DO NOT TEE.
                  4. As long as you are not putting boxes closer than 24" on either side of the wall (fire issue), this is fine.
                  5. This complies with 2011 NEC (National Electrical Code) requirements

                  So your assumption about T-ing things, at least without a junction box, is a br

            • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

              You might want to consider conduit in future. It's ugly but you can reconfigure it easily to add, remove or move sockets. You can get it in the shape of skirting board (or kick panels or whatever they are called in the US) which can look reasonable in a home, or DIY your own version.

            • by TheCarp (96830)

              > When I built my house, I was frustrated with my previous 1960's house that had 2 receptacles per
              > room. I said, hell with it, code says 6 feet, I'll make it 4. Note that thinking CORRECTLY, that would
              > have made it 8 feet between outlets.

              1960's! Oh the luxury!

              My house was built to the 90s codes...that is... 1890s. Original lighting in the house was gas lamp. A friend of mine, was at his grandmother's house up the road and was messing with an old gas lamp fixture and found....it was still connecte

        • by Dr Herbert West (1357769) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:56AM (#43771443)
          Mod parent up. I work with licensed sound engineers, gaffers, and A/V techs all the time...we get loads wrong all the time, and we're trying to do it right.

          Either "electric furniture" is your new business model (yikes!) or don't do it, ever.
          • by Khyber (864651)

            "I work with licensed sound engineers, gaffers, and A/V techs all the time...we get loads wrong all the time, and we're trying to do it right."

            You're working with the wrong people, for one, for load balancing.

            They're called ELECTRICIANS - something your sound engies, gaffers, and A/V techs very likely don't hold a certification for, let alone completed their journeyman's studies and time.

            • You're completely right-- and sometimes it's a real bummer when we show up at the place (stadium, concert hall, ballroom, corn field, whatevs) and all the info we need to set up boils down to "isn't that a power outlet over there? It is! Good luck!"

              Hence, the comparison to someone getting back from Ikea with an electric couch and setting it up with... instructions in Swedish?.
            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by Pubstar (2525396)
              So much this. I used to be a field electrician and a ETC certified repair technician (they make 3 phase 700 amp dimmer racks), and took a job doing audio afterwards. One day in the field my boss was yelling at the electrician for the show to "give him more neutral" because the neutral leg was arcing when he was trying to tie in. Yeah, it tends to do that if you plug in all the hot leads and have all the amps and distro on. I'm still amazed my old boss hasn't killed himself yet.
              • I still work in the field as a rigger/climber/rope access/electrician.

                Anyway flat out amazed with the occasional siting of some idiot tieing the hots in first. Or gawd forbid not confirming that the ground and neutral are not marked as a hot at the other end. I hear of that more often than i would like to.

                Nice to see i have some brothers on this forum.

    • Re:Easy (Score:5, Funny)

      by Shompol (1690084) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:37AM (#43771385)
      Seeing how I always have water spilled in the countertops (both kitchen and bathroom), I dub these "personal electrocution device"
    • Or just stop buying laptops, cell phones and tablets with crappy battery life. This is what happens when people buy 17" laptops with quadcore CPUs, power-sucking dedicated graphics and end up wanting to use them on the couch... or when they buy a tablet with less than 8 hours of battery life. It just shouldn't be done...

      • by cgenman (325138)

        They all have crappy battery life. It may start at 8 hours, but after a year it'll be down to 1 hour.

        Most of my friends have viable home laptops with no remaining battery of which to speak. And these were solid industrial models. Does that mean the whole thing should be thrown out and replaced?

        • "They all have crappy battery life. It may start at 8 hours, but after a year it'll be down to 1 hour."

          Now that's a huge exaggeration... I've had my Galaxy Nexus for about a year, and the battery life has not been diminished significantly.

          "Most of my friends have viable home laptops with no remaining battery of which to speak. And these were solid industrial models. Does that mean the whole thing should be thrown out and replaced?"

          Just stick in a new battery... that's the whole point of buying "solid indust

        • by Cenan (1892902)

          Stop treating rechargeable batteries as eternal - they aren't and nobody promised you any different. Most of them last for a really long time but they are still just consumables. If your laptop can't hold it's breath for more than 1 hour, get a new battery.

        • They all have crappy battery life. It may start at 8 hours, but after a year it'll be down to 1 hour.
          Most of my friends have viable home laptops with no remaining battery of which to speak. And these were solid industrial models. Does that mean the whole thing should be thrown out and replaced?

          You mean the battery loses most of its capacity in a single year... WTF are they doing to those things?
          I have a 9 year old laptop with a 17" WUXGA display which we use every day with near maximum brightness. When it was new, it could go for about 3 hours on a charge (fairly old CPU and battery technology, 'nuff said). Nowadays, it still gets better than 2 hours on a charge, and it's still using its original battery. So in 9 years of extensive use, both on AC power and battery power, it has lost about 30%

          • by dolmen.fr (583400)

            Linux may have worse power management than XP (especially if the manufacturer provides efficient Windows power management drivers, such as ThinkPad), but at least it uses the hard drive much much much less. And this alone should help to increase the practical usage of the battery capacity.

        • Most of my friends have viable home laptops with no remaining battery of which to speak. And these were solid industrial models. Does that mean the whole thing should be thrown out and replaced?

          No, it means they need to fork over the $ for a new battery which is normal for a laptop. Rechargable batteries only have a finite number of cycles in them and the ones in laptops typically show signs of wearing out after 2-3 years, less if the battery is used heavily. I've never seen one older than 3 years that held anywhere near the charge it did when new. Presuming the battery will last the lifetime of the computer is incorrect.

          This is why batteries need to be serviceable. They do not need to be hot

      • by wagnerrp (1305589)
        Huh? I have a 15" laptop with a quad-core CPU, 12GB of memory, and a 2GB Quadro chip, and I can easily run 7 hours before having to plug in.
        • That's because you probably did some research before you bought it. I'm also typing this on a 15.6" FullHD machine with 16 gigs of RAM, an SSD and a HDD and I don't plug in during the day - ever.

          Most people, however, end up with a non-switchable GeForce or Radeon and wonder why they're only getting 3 hours of battery life from a 95Wh extended battery...

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by jellomizer (103300)

      There is a reason my most furnature isn't teched up.
      Longevity, most good furnature is meant to last for years and possibly be passed down to generations.
      Technology gets old fast and the latest and greatest, is usually that much better.

      Just think about it this way. If my parents had a digital countertop in the 1980. It would be a vt100 terminal either amber or green screen. And would need 9 or 25 pin serial cable to a PC. And a bulky keyboard.

      Who knows what will be around in 30 years to make our slick multit

  • by Jason Lindberg (2927207) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:16PM (#43771065)
    The engineering problems that present themselves with wiring something that has mechanical components adjacent to or in direct connection to electrical wiring is protecting the cable from being damaged and heat generation. This can mean armored cables or flexible conduits, e-chain (for repetitive motion), or other cable management systems. If you are running any electricity though flammable materials then you need to be concerned about the amperage you pull through it and be mindful of how much it heats up as a regular and peak load. This is very important to be mindful of because a conductor may be rated for a certain amperage but at what temp? Make sure that temp is compatible with the rest of the construction materials involved in your furniture. A larger conductor would mean less heat as it passes an equivalent amount of current to a lower gauge of conductor.
    • by afidel (530433) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:37PM (#43771165)

      Heats not really a concern as far as flamability, even a 25A 208V circuit pulling 120% of rated load doesn't get over 110F (don't ask how I know this). The only way you're going to introduce enough heat energy to cause something to burn (especially furniture which is doused in flame-retardant chemicals thanks to smokers) is to short something out, so your comments about making sure that chords are protected is spot on.

      • by feepness (543479) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:27AM (#43771345) Homepage
        , so your comments about making sure that chords are protected is spot on. I've found E, A, and B are good power chords, but they only heat up if you use a wah-wah pedal.
      • by Immerman (2627577)

        Heh, try pulling that kind of amperage through a cheapo 18-AWG extension cord and I think you'll find that heat very quickly becomes an issue, and with only a little patience you'll have your even more exciting short-circuit to deal with.

        Which leads to my own bit of advice - if you're going to stick a cable inside a piece of furniture where you can't monitor it for developing flaws, make sure to use a much thicker cable than you think you'll ever need, because sooner or later somebody is going to plug in an

      • by bzipitidoo (647217) <bzipitidoo@yahoo.com> on Monday May 20, 2013 @01:05AM (#43771467) Journal

        That's only when everything is in good condition. Lot of house fires are started by degraded wiring. Anything that thins the conductive material or loosens a connection can increase the resistance at that spot so it will get hot enough to start a fire the next time someone uses a power hungry device such as a vacuum cleaner. As long as there's nothing flammable nearby, it may not cause any harm, but if this wiring is in a couch, could be a serious problem.

        All kinds of things can degrade the wiring. Ants, especially fire ants and now these crazy ants can chew the insulation, and build nests. I've seen an outlet stop working because the home's foundation had cracked, and shifted the walls enough to pull the wires out of the receptacles on the outlet. Also, builders almost always do the cheapest, shoddy electrical work code and inspectors allow them to get away with. Fortunately code is pretty strict these days, but it wasn't always. Then there's the do-it-yourself home owner who is completely ignorant of code and decides to add some extra lighting or a ceiling fan. Must watch out for older homes. One will find circuit breakers that were poorly designed (Stab-Lok models, for instance), outlets that were never properly grounded or that are near sinks and bathtubs and lacking GFI, and wiring run sideways through the walls or that has no slack or is too close to something else such as a fireplace's chimney.

        If we want to wire up furniture, it will take some effort to do it safely. We've dealt with safety by simply keeping electricity away from flammable material and water.

    • by fermion (181285) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:04AM (#43771263) Homepage Journal
      Furniture like this does exist. Last time I was shopping for furniture, about a year ago, I saw sofas and armchairs with power. I have also seen table in all different sizes with center power strips and pop up power, with internet connections. Anyone who has been to college within the past 10 or 15 years is familiar with these. 30 years ago we owned an easy chair with a telephone and remote built into it. I thought it was cool.

      That said there are many reasons why such things would not be standard. First is reliability. While furniture is often warranted for 5 years, electrical components is warranted are generally warranted for a year. This adds complexity and uncertainty. Also, furniture, even for Ikea, is meant to last for years. After 10 years, such configurations may seem antiquated and uncool, like a formica top.

      Then there are liability issues that will occur when someone hooks up a power strip to the table. Sure fuses and the like can reduce the risk of fire, but it will only take one to bankrupt the company. So there is a non trivial risk.

      So I would retrofit. Fot table conduit and hole saws will put as many sockets as you want. For sofas maybe just use a glue gun to attach a power strip to the bottom?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:18PM (#43771083)

    Please elaborate.

    • by c0lo (1497653)

      Please elaborate.

      I'll take a wild guess: making your couch able to deliver a disabling high voltage shock (possible remoted over internet) just in case there's a break-in and the burglar sits on the couch (may also work fine for the case one's teenage kids bring their GF/BF when one's not at home and attempting someone doesn't approve).
      Let me think... I reckon this pertains to the "in-depth security" topic (like in "implementing your defense under the depth of the couch's upholstery/pillows") - one can never be too cautious

      • Also: Helping natural selection work.

        • by c0lo (1497653)

          Also: Helping natural selection work.

          Only if it happens before beta test stage. Otherwise, chances are stacked against victims that may not warrant an "early retirement from the evolution cycle".

  • by OhANameWhatName (2688401) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:52PM (#43771219)
    They've been making custom powered chairs [wikipedia.org] in the US for a hundred years.
  • by willoughby (1367773) on Sunday May 19, 2013 @11:52PM (#43771223)

    ...I made a chair for my mother-in-law once. .. My wife wouldn't let me plug it in.

  • by i22yb (1273254) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:00AM (#43771249)
    I happen to work for a furniture store. This feature already exists in a lot of office furniture and, occasionally, in some living room furniture. You will find it more often in an end table because those are usually placed closer to a wall. You will only find it in sofas and chairs, once in a while, if the piece already contains a motorized reclining mechanism. Otherwise, it's just not a practical application to add to those pieces of furniture. Not many shoppers would pay an extra $100 to have a power outlet pre manufactured into their sofa when they can just plug their device directly into the wall, or get a cheap $6 power strip that will do the job. Also, it would not make sense to put these into a coffee table, because coffee tables are usually placed out in the middle of a room and you would have to run a cord across the floor to power the table. Furniture makers do not want to be sued for tripping hazards.
  • by egcagrac0 (1410377) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:00AM (#43771251)

    Look at a Plugmold [legrand.us] or similar power strip, mount along the front of the couch. (Underneath, for aesthetic reasons.)

    Something like this means you're not doing the wiring (if you were qualified, you'd just do it, rather than ask), all you need to do is the mechanical mounting (a few L brackets should do nicely).

    Caveat: If you have small children about, this is putting outlets in their reach.

    If you want something like this in a coffee table (or if your couch isn't against a wall), have an electrician install a floor outlet in an appropriate spot.

  • by goodmanj (234846) on Monday May 20, 2013 @12:07AM (#43771273)

    The college where I teach just renovated its science center. I'm very happy with the tabletop power we have in our new physics classroom, and I think the "lessons learned" apply to a kitchen too:

      Don't do low-voltage DC. It'll never be the voltage you want, and plug standardization is a nightmare.
      Don't put outlets on the top of the table. You'll spill, drop crumbs, and ruin the outlets.
      Think about spilled liquids. A lot.
      Make sure you can move the table to the other side of the room without cutting wires.

    Our new physics lab classroom has long, heavy wooden "butcher block" tables with a top that overhangs the edge by an inch. The outlets are on the front edge of the table, protected from liquids by the overhang. The outlet boxes run to a heavy-duty cable with a male plug on the end: you plug the tables into a recessed floor box.

    • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

      Unfortunately overhangs don't always protect you from spills. Liquid can cling to the underside. Even worse you can't see it happening from above.

  • At the office, we've retrofitted a few conference tables with simple parts from Mockett . Pretty straightforward stuff - cut the proper holes, drop in the receptacles, and plug them in.

    • by Fjandr (66656)

      Mockett is just awesome. They have some of the greatest furniture-tech integration products on the market.

  • by ridgecritter (934252) on Monday May 20, 2013 @01:02AM (#43771463)

    I had started to babysit a wonderful dog for a friend. The dog liked to sit under my desk when I was working. One day, my Mini wouldn't boot. Dog toothmarks were evident on the low voltage (thank heavens) side of the power block, making it pretty easy to troubleshoot. As he got used to his new surroundings, no further wire chewing, but it could have been a disaster for all concerned. My animal house friends tell me rabbits are the worst, like frustrated EEs with buck teeth...

    Anyway, think about animals, little kids, etc. when you're electrifying your furniture.

  • Some offices don't even bother with Ethernet cabling anymore; they just use WiFi. This was unheard of 15 years ago, when Slashdot users were no doubt grousing about their homebuilder's oversight for not incorporating Ethernet into their homes during construction.

    I predict 15 years from now, the constant need to be tethered to A/C will be obviated, either through wireless recharging, through improved device charge capacity, or through increased energy efficiency.

    • by blackpaw (240313)

      Some offices don't even bother with Ethernet cabling anymore; they just use WiFi. This was unheard of 15 years ago, when Slashdot users were no doubt grousing about their homebuilder's oversight for not incorporating Ethernet into their homes during construction.

      I predict 15 years from now, the constant need to be tethered to A/C will be obviated, either through wireless recharging, through improved device charge capacity, or through increased energy efficiency.

      Or the next GFC/Global Warning/Asteroid strike will have reduced us to scrabbling in the ruins for AA batteries to drive our Nintendos

      • Or the next GFC/Global Warning/Asteroid strike will have reduced us to scrabbling in the ruins for AA batteries to drive our Nintendos

        Don't lose hope. Just because the population of the earth is reduced to 500 million it doesn't mean the government black ops in their bunkers won't keep the power plants running.

  • The thing about furniture is that its generic. Its not for you or your room or your precise purpose but for "someone" with "a room" that might want to do "something" with it.

    That lack of specificity requires things be vague. Furthermore, there is an extreme emphasis on lowering initial cost as regards these sorts of things. And due to the way we manufacture things it is understood that after it has left the factor it won't be upgraded or changed or modified.

    To get what you're talking about implemented you'd

  • Furniture moves around. They are not fixed. Ever been to an office where there are no cubicles? They need false floors to do the wiring to the desks a lot of the time or it comes out of the ceiling.

    For an office false floors are a standard. For a house, they are not. That will add extra cost that most people rather spend on an extra room or paint or windows.

    You will have perhaps 3 extra outlets and for that your new false floor will be too expensive.

  • The tables in the reading and studying rooms of the ONB ( Austrian National Library ) all have power outlets concealed under their tops. The tables look like plain, solid wood to the casual stroller-by. Just reach to your left when sitting at one of the pre-indicated places, and you'll find one.
  • by stenvar (2789879)

    In kitchens, you use wall-mounted power strips. In living rooms, you use extension cords and (if really necessary) outlets concealed in the floor. If you really want it attached to the furniture, mount a power strip under the sofa/chair/table.

  • The reason I got into studying embedded systems is to work on ubiquitous computing:
    -Put SoC's into everything;
    -Hook everything to a hybrid cloud; (NaaS)
    -Serve it with a cloud server at home; (RedHat OpenStack distro on Fedora)
    -Create an XML-based protocol on top;
    -Have it all talk to each other;
    -Build it all on Minix 3; (so it never crashes and every device server has to be hacked seperately)
    -Enjoy the shit out of modern life!

    Your agenda (GTK HTML5 webapp) knows when you need to wake up and plays your most l

  • If it's such a great idea and no-ones making them, then do it yourself and get rich. I do think, however, that you'll soon realize that most couches are purchased by wives for reasons very different than utility... and the draping of the extension cords is done later by husbands thinking only of utility.

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