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Displays Portables

Ask Slashdot: Portable High-Resolution External Displays? 141

Posted by timothy
from the just-don't-get-mugged dept.
First time accepted submitter paragonc writes "I am a software engineer who works remotely. I'm amazingly lucky to live in Austin, Texas where I have access to multiple high quality co-working facilities within biking distance. While these places are great for networking and establishing a rhythm to daily life, not having a permanent desk forces me to pack my gear in and out each day. This means i pack light. My current Go Bag includes a 13.3 inch MacBook pro, and an iPad running avatron Air Display. This has worked well, but i'm sorely missing having a real high resolution external monitor. I've looked at a few of the USB powered external displays, but the resolution seems to only hit 1366 X 768. I'd be curious if slashdotters have any tricks up their sleeves on how to implement a high resolution portable external displays."
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Ask Slashdot: Portable High-Resolution External Displays?

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  • "This has worked well, but i'm sorely missing having a real high resolution external monitor. I've looked at a few of the USB powered external displays, but the resolution seems to only hit 1366 X 768."

    WTF is a 'real high resolution' monitor for you and what do you consider 'portable'.
    Your Mac and iPad are already pretty good, so what are you actually looking for?
    There are USB2HDMI adapters that work up to 1080p so this must not be enough for you.

    • by ACluk90 (2618091)

      The thing is... he is not looking for an USB powered adapter, but actually for an entire USB powered display.

      As he seems to be looking for a replacement of his iPad as an external monitor, I suspect that he is looking at something like 1080p and somewhat larger, maybe the size of his macbook pro.

      The only thing that comes to mind for me is the old, ridiculous ThinkPad W700ds with the built-in second screen.

    • Re:Depends. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ranton (36917) on Saturday June 01, 2013 @08:02PM (#43886149)

      WTF is a 'real high resolution' monitor for you and what do you consider 'portable'.

      While he should have been more explicit, it is obvious that what he wants is more vertical lines of text on screen and more characters per line. High resolution displays like retina screens are great for images and crisper text, but they don't actually help fit more text on a screen. The new MacBook Pro Retina may have 2880 x 1800 resolution, but for software enginers it isn't much better than a 1440x900 screen because it doesn't fit more text (at a readable size) than this smaller resolution.

      For someone like myself who is used to working on either two 27" 2560 x 1440 monitors at work or a 30" 2560x1600 + 24" 1920x1200 monitor at home, the removal of the macbook pro 17" laptop left a big hole in the marketplace for 'high text density' laptops. If someons starts making a 1920x1200 laptop again along with a 1200 vertical resolution portable external monitor, they would have my business.

      Since I won't need a new laptop for a couple years, I am really hoping that a 17" Retina display laptop comes out by 2015. That would be essentially the same thing as the old 17" macbook.

      • The new MacBook Pro Retina may have 2880 x 1800 resolution, but for software enginers it isn't much better than a 1440x900 screen because it doesn't fit more text (at a readable size) than this smaller resolution.

        I disagree. The rMBP runs very nicely in "more space" mode, which is the equivalent of 1920x1200 mode. It's quite usable for smaller and still readable text.

        • Still readable text is wholly subjective. And I'm still holding on to this 2008 17" MBP until I can buy a 17" replacement.

        • Sorry disagree with you. I use a Macbook Pro 14", but have a REALLY old Dell Inspiron 6000 (10 years old now), with native 1920x1200 res. Yes Dell had such a beast back then. It was only for a year or so and I bought it right away. Even though the CPU is woefully underpowered I use it as thin client for my Server VM's and have to say it is awesome working on such a screen. You really have quite a bit of real estate to code, debug, etc... So yes Apple should bring out another 17" notebook.

      • by wvmarle (1070040)

        And you just hit the big issue of portability: it's not resolution as much as overall size of the screen that's the most important factor.

        So what the original poster is looking for is a huge screen that is somehow still portable... and until we have foldable/rollable screens, that's always going to be a trade-off.

      • The Retina MBPs can be run scaled (1680x1050 for the 13"er and 1920x1200 for the 15"er), or in their native resolutions (using third party software). If you like OSX and Apple, they're pretty awesome for high-res coding and so on.

        For the OP, I'd recommend simply replacing his MBP with an rMBP, or at least a device with a 1080p display (available anywhere from 12" [Zenbook] to 17")... since external high-res displays aren't to be had, a decent internal display is the next best thing.

      • by stenvar (2789879)

        the removal of the macbook pro 17" laptop left a big hole in the marketplace for 'high text density' laptops.

        There are plenty of 17" HD laptops around, just not from Apple. That's what you get if you tie yourself to a single vendor for your software and hardware.

        • by ranton (36917)

          The Macbook Pro 17" was the only one with 1920x1200 resolution. There are now no vendors that sell that level of resolution or higher on a screen big enough for the equivalent of 1920x1200 to be very readable.

          • by stenvar (2789879)

            You're saying that 17" 1920x1200 is good enough but 18.5" 1920x1080 is not? Sorry, that's silly.

            • by ranton (36917)

              You're saying that 17" 1920x1200 is good enough but 18.5" 1920x1080 is not? Sorry, that's silly.

              Why is that silly? 1920x1200 has 200 extra vertical pixels, meaning quite a bit more vertical room for text. Considering most development environments probably lose around 300-400 pixels to toolbars, debug windows, etc., that is around a 15% increase in vertical screen size for your actual code.

              I agree that a 18.5" 1920x1080 screen is very readable but it loses significant screen real estate that some laptop owners have enjoyed for over 10 years.

              • by stenvar (2789879)

                1920x1200 has 200 extra vertical pixels, meaning quite a bit more vertical room for text

                No, it has 120 extra vertical pixels, i.e. 10% more. But that's irrelevant, since HD resolutions on laptops are high enough that you simply choose a 10% lower DPI and your text is going to look fine. On an 18.5" diagonal laptop with 1920x1080 resolution, you are going to have more room, not less, than on a 17" 16:10 display, even if your DPI are a little lower.

                Apple is just a run-of-the-mill laptop vendor; they have no m

          • by dfghjk (711126)

            Which is interesting because Apple was the LAST vendor to offer a 1920x1200 17" display in a laptop. Every PC vendor did that until the price fell out. Apple had to be dragged kicking and screaming into the >100 dpi club. Now they pretend to have invented it.

            And, of course, there are 1920 displays available, it's just that 16x10 is regrettably gone.

    • "This has worked well, but i'm sorely missing having a real high resolution external monitor. I've looked at a few of the USB powered external displays, but the resolution seems to only hit 1366 X 768."

      What do the co-working facilities offer in the way of office facilities? If they are cubes, then you'll have to go with a LCD display. If you have an option of an office where you can close the windows and dim the lights, then a small digital projector might work.

      My opinion is that the best option would be to see if each facility has a locker area where you can store the display. Then buy a display for each facility that you use on a regular basis. This would be a much better option than lugging a LCD d

  • by plopy (265642) on Saturday June 01, 2013 @07:55PM (#43886115)

    I have been facing the same problem, and have just accepted the fact I either will have to buy the "smallest" retail display that has at least 1080p (like a 19 or 20"), or custom make something. I have been looking at using an ipad 3/4 LCD connected to a small board and using the displayport on my Macbook air.

    I bought a panel off ebay for around $60 USD and am looking at a either a pre-made board at http://dp2retina.rozsnyo.com/ [rozsnyo.com] or seeing if someone makes a board for less money. The ipad 3/4 display is eDP so the boards are pretty simple. Then its just making a case for it, which is the hardest part for me!

    • by plopy (265642)

      Here is another link, I read off Hack a day a while ago: http://emerythacks.blogspot.com/2013/04/connecting-ipad-retina-lcd-to-pc.html [blogspot.com]

      I also bought a few old motorola lapdocks, and one of them I gutted to just a controller and panel. Its only 1366x768, but it accepts HDMI input, and is a good conversation starter at my desk at work when I use it for the occasional 3rd monitor. Other than stuff like that, there is not much that is higher resolution you can just buy.

    • I have been facing the same problem, and have just accepted the fact I either will have to buy the "smallest" retail display that has at least 1080p (like a 19 or 20"), or custom make something. I have been looking at using an ipad 3/4 LCD connected to a small board and using the displayport on my Macbook air.

      I bought a panel off ebay for around $60 USD and am looking at a either a pre-made board at http://dp2retina.rozsnyo.com/ [rozsnyo.com] or seeing if someone makes a board for less money. The ipad 3/4 display is eDP so the boards are pretty simple. Then its just making a case for it, which is the hardest part for me!

      I smell a Kickstarter here...

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 01, 2013 @08:01PM (#43886139)

    I keep the monitors in two oversized suite cases. The trick is to get foam padding that fits the suite case and the monitors.
    I found a place that cuts the form. I went with my suite case and monitor and they cut everything just right.
    The form cost me about $200. The suite case is about $300 (each).
    I've been all of the world with the monitors. My only issue is that international airlines only allow one bag
    and the cost of check a heavy second bag can be equal to the cost of flying business class. So my solution
    is to fly business class.

    I don't think you would be so crazy to travel with a 27" monitor but the short answer is you should get custom form made so you can travel with any monitor you like.

    • by ranton (36917)

      That is pretty awesome. Can you provide the names of the suit case you bought that is big enough for this, along with the type of foam you bought? I don't travel very much for work, but if you have found a reasonable way for me to transport my two apply thunderbolt displays I would be very interested in knowing the details. It would be useful even for times where I have to move my monitor setup to another area of the office to work with another team temporarily.

      • by JWSmythe (446288)

        I'm not sure if you're trolling or not. Lets assume you're not.

        This should do it, [pelican.com]

        It does seem like overkill to use a foam padded case, where you could just throw them on a cart. Well, assuming your office is so big that you couldn't just carry them.

      • by wvmarle (1070040)

        I am thinking he may be using flight cases, like musicians use for their instruments and equipment. They are custom made, including the foam. Usually made of wood with aluminium framework, very sturdy, relative light weight.

        • by Ronin441 (89631)

          relative light weight

          In my experience, custom-made transit cases of this style (plywood panels with thin aluminium sheets over them and aluminium corner and edge pieces) are heavier and more expensive than a similarly sized Pelikan cases.

          If you left out the plywood and used something like Ayres composite panels [ayrescom.com], you could save a lot of weight, though.

    • by sosume (680416)

      Your math does not add up. A ticket Paris-NYC is roughly USD 700. The business class ticket is roughly USD 2200. The case solution you mention costs about USD 800, the monitors are USD 1000 each.So for the surplus of business class alone, you can buy a brand new cinema display every flight. Looks like you take the least economic option possible. But since you travel around the world first class carrying two cinema displays in tailored cases, you must be loaded. Right.

      • You could also buy a storage locker at the far end and leave the monitors there (assuming you don't have an apartment or office you could leave them at)... if you travel often enough, it'll be more economical that way. You aren't factoring in the cost of extra oversize baggage.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      For the cost of the difference between business class and economy on most international flights you could outright purchase 2 27" monitors when you go there. Plus, if your presence is sufficiently valuable to be worth a business class flight then your employer should be more than happy to provide you with the screens. The only possible exception I can think of is if you need color calibrated displays, in which case you'd be better off carrying a 1kg calibrator instead.

      • by RockDoctor (15477)

        For the cost of the difference between business class and economy on most international flights you could outright purchase 2 27" monitors when you go there.

        IF you could get them. Finding such equipment in a strange town in a country you don't know and in a language you don't speak more than a few words of, can take a significant chunk of your time.

    • by BenJury (977929)

      Surly for the price difference between an international economy and business class ticket, you could buy a new monitor in the country of your destination!

      A 27" ASUS monitor costs ~£200 odd quid, a economy ticked from London to NYC is ~£700 a business class ticket must be about £1500?

  • What do you need a high resolution monitor for? Are you doing graphics, or some other type of work where you need the highest resolution you can get because anything less makes it hard for you to get things done, or is it simply something you'd like to have but can live without? I'm asking because if your work actually requires that kind of high-end equipment, your company should be supplying it, even if you're bringing in your own computer. And, if you don't really need it, the question becomes how much
    • Exactly. If he writes software, I don't see how the 13.3" screen of his MBP wouldn't be enough.
      • I dont' know about you, but the last time I was writing code - Friday - I had eight source code windows open, and was referring to four of them simultaneously. And that excludes the windows for the compiler and reference materials.

      • by nschubach (922175)

        Of all the things I do on a computer, software development has been the major reason for multiple monitor setups. I can think of no other single reason to use multiple displays greater than that of development. It surprises me how many people assume that developers only need one screen because of their shortsighted vision that a developer is "just showing text so therefore must not need a fancy set of displays."

        On top of that, some of they guys at work have been moving to Macbooks for their development ma

        • I can't figure out why [MacBook users would] want to lug around thunderbolt adapters and everything else to plug in multiple screens when they had a perfectly capable docking station with their Dell laptop previously. Why don't Macs have docking ports?

          The MacBook has a docking port. It's called Thunderbolt. What's the difference between a "docking station" and a "Thunderbolt adapter"?

          • by nschubach (922175)

            A docking station you just place your laptop on and you can control things like power, plug in multiple monitors, keyboard/mouse, headset, etc. All with one motion. With the current state of Apple devices you have to plug in about four things before you start working. It doesn't sound like a lot, but if you regularly attend meetings, plugging and unplugging throughout the day can get tedious. A docking station is much more convenient. I would agree that Thunderbolt in theory should be able to daisy cha

      • Because it is not?
        You run your IDE on the internal monitor, and the software you develop on the external one, so you can use the software and debugg it without constantly swichting windows back and forth.
        And that is only the most obvious reason why you need an external, monitor when you develop seriously ...

  • How about a second notebook? It could have very low specs, just wlan and a good screen resolution. Of course it is a little less portable, but still cheap and a comfortable solution.... Maybe you even have one at home, or you could easily get one on ebay.

  • I can't really think of a *portable* monitor that would work. A mini-projector, and maybe a little screen to project on, would probably be your best bet.

    Alternately, there's this [blogspot.com]. Someone's figured out how to drive an iPad display using DisplayPort. You'd need to do some difficult soldering, and you wouldn't end up with a very professional-looking product (no casing), but it would be portable, high-def and somewhat cheap.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 01, 2013 @08:16PM (#43886213)

    I have a 13" Retina Display MacBook Pro using Retina DisplayMenu that gets me up to 2560x1600 plus AirDisplay streaming to my iPad as a second 2048x1536 monitor. While there is a slight delay when working on the iPad, it is a great place to put the extra windows that are not graphic intensive (terminal windows, word processors) or I need to see but not use regularly (control panels, toolbars). It is an incredible amount of screen real estate in such a small package.

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      well, I assume the point of his question was to have something that's a real display without the lag, since he is already using an ipad with air display.

      there's kits now to attach those sceens as displayport monitors.

  • there are some field monitors for video/film work out there that have fullhd resolution. you'd still need an external battery and they are probably way more expensive than anything you'd want to spend on a monitor (think 1-3 13inch MBPs), but still... maybe - with a little bit of hacking - you could get something like an ipad retina display and hook it up to your computer. have a look at this: http://emerythacks.blogspot.co.at/2013/04/connecting-ipad-retina-lcd-to-pc.html [blogspot.co.at]
  • by NEDHead (1651195) on Saturday June 01, 2013 @08:25PM (#43886243)

    A larger basket for the bike

  • by jittles (1613415)
    Why exactly do you need this? This sounds like a waste. I work from home every single day of the week an have a nice Dell Ultra Sharp 27" display at 2556xwhatever. It's wonderful. And if I want to socialize, I go out with my friends. What does this co-working facility offer exactly?
    • At least I can get way more shit done if I have a context change between leisure and work.
      • by jittles (1613415)

        At least I can get way more shit done if I have a context change between leisure and work.

        Well certainly if you have young kids / nagging spouse then it can be difficult to concentrate at home. For my context switch I always make sure that I get up and get ready, just like I was going to go to work. I don't have a TV anywhere near my work area, and avoid having other distracting things in that area. If that is what s/he is looking for is a context switch, then that makes sense. I still think this portable monitor thing is silly. Maybe he should start a business of a co-working facility that

  • iPad screen hack (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Tagged_84 (1144281) on Saturday June 01, 2013 @09:00PM (#43886395) Homepage
    If you're comfortable with hardware you could pick up an iPad LCD screen ( around $60 on ebay ) and add a display port connection to it, the only outstanding issue is an enclosure but access to a 3d printer could solve that.
    http://hackaday.com/2013/04/22/connect-a-retina-display-to-a-regular-computer/ [hackaday.com]
  • USB displays (Score:5, Informative)

    by Collin (41088) on Saturday June 01, 2013 @09:03PM (#43886405) Homepage

    I'll take my guess at what the OP is asking. He refers to USB-powered displays, but complains that they are too low-res. They really are a great idea and I could see a bunch of uses for them.

    Here is a 16" USB-powered display [amzn.to], which combines a DisplayLink USB display adapter with a flat-panel LCD display. The problem is that its pixel resolution is only 1366 x 768, which is pretty low density for that panel size. It's like a typical entry-level 15.6" laptop panel. If you look at 15.6" laptops, they start at 1366x768, then as you move up the model range, the pixel res goes up to 1600x900, then further up, 1920x1080 is about as high as it goes at this size.

    I suspect that the OP would like a product just like this display, but with a 1600x900 or 1080P display panel like those used on higher-end laptops. This would totally make sense, but some quick searches didn't turn anything like this up on Amazon. So his real question is if anybody knows of one of these types of displays that has a higher-res panel. Personally, I'd consider one of these as well for on-site video editing.

    There is a similar 21" USB-powered display [amzn.to] which does run 1080P but it's up to the OP as to whether he still considers that portable or not.

    • by fa2k (881632)

      Maybe it's a bandwidth issue. At 480Mbit/s you can push 1366x768 24 bit colour at 20 Hz. There would possibly be some compression, but it can't be too fancy as you'd have to drive it from USB power (if you allow an external adapter then just use DVI or DisplayPort anyway). Now with USB3 there is 10x as much bandwidth and more power, but that only equates to a factor sqrt(10)~3 in linear resolution (i.e., bandwidth increases greatly with pixel density). Still, a factor 3 on 1366x768 is amazing resolution, so

      • by Collin (41088)

        well, they do have a 1080P 21" version [amzn.to], so it's unlikely bandwidth is the gating issue. DisplayLink has been doing this for a while with USB video adapters. I am not exactly sure how they implemented the link protocol, but it likely isn't pushing raw pixel data since it needs special drivers. It likely sends API calls for the chip at the other end to execute and only sends raw pixels for bitmap areas like photos or videos.

    • I tweeted this [twitter.com] to @AOCusa, so maybe if enough people get on their case about it, they will make a 1080P version: "@AOCusa Please make your 16" USB Display with a higher-res panel (1600x900 or 1080P). Great idea, but 1366x768 too low to add much value."

  • It's not exactly what I'd call "high resolution" (it's 1366x768 horizontal, 768x1366 vertical), but it is USB-powered and portable (15.6" diagonal, 3.4 pounds):

    http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/07/hp-u160-usb-monitor/ [engadget.com]
  • Which is one of the 1366x768 resolution monitors you said you didn't want: http://www.lenovo.com/products/us/monitor/lt1421/ [lenovo.com]. Given that portable productivity is my main concern though, I thought I'd share my experience with it. I use this display with a maxed-out i5 Lenovo x230 which itself is only 1366x768 - something that nearly put me off buying this brilliant little machine in the first place; but in the end I knew I'd be docking into a proper monitor for any serious work.

    I take the display with me if

  • by tlambert (566799) on Saturday June 01, 2013 @09:28PM (#43886497)

    It looks like you now have a new company idea. Assuming the market for one of these is anything other than minuscule for whatever price point you are able to hit while building them in China or Japan, assuming you can drive something of that resolution from USB power in the first place. Personally, given the proce differential between "retina: and "non-retina" devices, all other things being equal, I think that these would be of limited use for everyone except professional video editors or the idle rich.

    If you are actually serious about needing the external display space for something other than field video editing, then you have picked the wrong coworking space, since plenty of them have pluggable displays available, and some of them even have cable vending machines, in case you are lacking the necessary cable to hook up to your laptop.

    For the Austin area, I know of at least Conjunctured is one company that has so-called "community monitors", but they are first come, first serve, so if you wanted one there, you'd need to get there pretty early to claim one before they were all spoken for already.

  • Don't any of these places have lockers where you could leave a monitor and any other misc equipment? 22 1920x1080 monitors are pretty damn cheap nowadays, you could probably afford to leave one at each site. Use it in portrait mode and you've got tons of lines of text visible at once.

  • I had the same requirements as 'timothy' and there really is very little on the market that meets them. I suspect all the sufficiently small HD screens are being snapped up by tablet manufacturers. It's a shame Apple seems to have banished USB pass-through apps, or the iPad + AirDisplay would make a nice choice. I looked at the AOC E2251Fwu, a "semi portable" product [itproportal.com]. Bit large for me, and the build quality and design don't suit me. This HP-U160 [hp.com] seemed cute, but is not HD, so I ruled it out. I eventuall
  • by Anonymous Coward

    If you've got the cash to spend, you could get a 1080p convertible notebook. I'm aware of two 1080p models below 13 inches, though the market may have expanded since I bought mine. Sony makes an 11.6-inch Vaio, and the Dell XPS 12 (which I have) is 12.5" and works pretty well. In addition to working as a standalone separate computer if desired (including running your OS of choice in a VM), you can flip it into tablet mode in your orientation of choice, and share the keyboard and mouse from your MBP using Sy

  • DisplayLink sells ~$90 USB to HDMI/DVI 2048x1152 adapters.
  • So a usb display doesn't have the resolution you want? Use 2 of them.

    Use 3, use 4. I don't care. Next time, think a little.

  • I've been using an iPad (2048x1536) with AirDisplay [avatron.com]. It works just fine for your scenario. The frame rate is dependant on the connection speed, so it's not suitable for games and video, but there are other solutions for that.

    • by RulerOf (975607)
      I tried the same thing and couldn't stand the awful performance---turns out the performance woes are caused by the virtual display adapter. Try Splashtop, and just force your computer to connect a second monitor to your existing video card. You can usually force it with Windows, but a simple resistor in a dvi adapter will work too as a dummy plug.

      Even at 2048x1536, I was able to watch movies, play 3D games, and more all as if it was connected locally. It's rather impressive, though it's a shame that S
  • by Osgeld (1900440)

    you bought a laptop that doesnt suit your needs and now want to carry more crap to compensate it

    dude, large screen laptop would weigh the same as carrying around all that crap

  • Not USB-powered, but could work:
    http://www.amazon.com/Monitor2Go-15-6-HDMI-Portable-Monitor/dp/B00AYH7AIE [amazon.com]

    It's 15", has a 1600x900 resolution, and does everything else perfectly. I doubt it would be hard to get one of those portable battery extenders to interface with it and make it untethered as well as portable. Something like this, perhaps? http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005NGLTZQ [amazon.com]
  • Aren't there all kinds of cheap 1080p projectors on the market? I got one from Costco a few years ago for about $900. Use it to play Xbox mostly, but somehow it's still working on the original bulb, and is still plenty bright when projecting onto a 9 foot wide screen.

    A projector is often smaller than a monitor, and your screen size is only limited by your available wall dimensions.

    • by Osgeld (1900440)

      900$ is cheap for 1080? you are a special kind of stupid

      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        Well, he is projecting a 9 foot wide screen. Even assuming that's diagonal, that's the equivalent of a 108 inch display. If you wanted an LCD panel that size, you'd be paying thousands, if they even exist. I think the largest consumer LCD I've seen is around 80 inches. So $900 for a 108 inch display isn't that bad at all.
  • Get an inexpensive LCD screen (about $140 at Newegg), I have a slightly older version of this Asus 21" 1920 x 1080 LCD back-light monitor, works great and is fairly light weight:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236100 [newegg.com]

    Make a case with some foam padding and cloth that won't scratch the screen. Maybe something like a Pelican case (the monitor above is about 15" x 20").

    Looks like there is a Hackerspace in Austin. Go visit them and maybe they will be able to help you hack something togeth

  • I just saw this article: http://blog.laptopmag.com/asus-mb168b-portable-monitor [laptopmag.com] Looks like ASUS is coming out with a 2lb 15.6" 1080p monitor for ~$200. Comes with case that converts to stand, and monitor can be driven by a single USB 3.0 connection. Looks like a steal.

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