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Open Source The Internet Linux

Ask Slashdot: Parental Content Control For Free OSs? 260

m.alessandrini writes Children grow up, and inevitably they will start using internet and social networks, both for educational and recreational purposes. And it won't take long to them to learn to be autonomous, especially with all the smartphones and tablets around and your limited time. Unlike the years of my youth, when internet started to enter our lives gradually, now I'm afraid of the amount of inappropriate contents a child can be exposed to unprepared: porn, scammers, cyberbullies or worse, are just a click away.

For Windows many solutions claim to exist, usually in form of massive antivirus suites. What about GNU/Linux? Or Android? Several solutions rely on setting up a proxy with a whitelist of sites, or similar, but I'm afraid this approach can make internet unusable, or otherwise be easy to bypass. Have you any experiences or suggestions? Do you think software solutions are only a part of the solution, provided children can learn hacking tricks better than us, and if so, what other 'human' techniques are most effective?
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Ask Slashdot: Parental Content Control For Free OSs?

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  • The best trick (Score:3, Insightful)

    by msobkow ( 48369 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @06:24AM (#49104549) Homepage Journal

    The best trick is for parents to actually supervise their children.

    I hate all you lazy buggers who just "plug the kids in" and leave them for hours a day unsupervised. Do your damned job as parents!

    • Re:The best trick (Score:5, Informative)

      by m.alessandrini ( 1587467 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @06:53AM (#49104613)
      Before all the other idiot comments like this, nobody is denying that supervision and education are the first thing, but as said in the summary, parents have limited time, and children have many ways of accessing the web.
      • by Zero__Kelvin ( 151819 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @07:29AM (#49104723) Homepage
        Agreed. And no matter what he does his children will still have that access. He does't own every computer system in the world. His children will simply use other systems rather than their own, when they want to go outside the limitation system he implements.

        This isn't anything new just because you throw the intertubes into the mix. It is the same problem parents have always had. How can I control my children at all times, given that there is no frigging way in hell I can ever have that kind of control?
      • Can you control the content they access when they are over at their friends place? "Many ways to access the web": yeah if you let them. Kids don't have a God given right to game consoles that are web connected, or cellphones, or tablets or ... IMO parents often supply all the above because they are a) in capable of saying no to their kids and/or the "great deal" being offered for a family plan, b) similar to a) don't want their kids to do anything they don't want to so boring them by making them sit on the

      • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 ) *

        Even as an adult I sometimes get porn when I was looking for something else. That's just the nature of the internet. I'd suggest:

        - When they are very young simply whitelist sites you want them to go to at the DNS level. Set up a router with wifi that blocks everything else. Don't give them access to things like social media in particular, and besides which Facebook etc. usually require you to be at least 13 to sign up.

        - When they get older and start actually looking for porn keep internet connected devices

    • Re:The best trick (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ray-auch ( 454705 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @07:01AM (#49104637)

      Yeah that worked right up to the time everything went mobile. Still just about works for high end gaming but that's it.

      Nothing is plugged in now, kids or devices, unless it's charging. All is wireless and portable and trivial to hide what you are doing even for feet away. Todays kids come home with tablets provided by the school which need to connect to the net to do their homework. Yes, really, they do.

      People need to understand that todays kids have grown up with this stuff, they are intuitively familiar with it in the way we never will be - I was writing games in assembly language at age 12, but when I need to know how to do something on a phone I ask my kids, its quicker than Google. We will never out control or outsmart our kids on tech, best we can do is pass on our experience so they are prepared, and they'll still catch us out.

      • I know how my parents would have dealt with that: they'd have had a locked cabinet, and we'd be told to put the tablets in the cabinet, and when we wanted to do our homework we should let them know, and they'd get the tablet for us, and do it with us.

        As much as "45 minutes on the computer" grated when I was a child, as an adult I think it was actually a sensible idea.

        • When I was a kid, computers took 45 minutes to boot, you insensitive clod!

          In all probability, the best solution is to let them watch it real young, then they will say "Eeew - naked people, yukkk!" and never watch again.

          Second best solution is to join the Amish. At least you will get a nice quilt!

          Practically anything they can see on the internet has got to be better than the stuff on Cartoon Network in every possible way (probably including snuff movies).

          • Second best solution is to join the Amish. At least you will get a nice quilt!

            When I was a teen, I met and befriended some amish teens at a farmers' market near where I lived. Their parents allowed them to talk with us "English kids". They had other non-amish friends, too. Their village had phones - strictly for business and emergency use, but they were familiar with phones. Also calculators - which they were only allowed to use when helping at the farmers' market. I'm sure, these days, Amish kids are familiar with the internet despite whatever restrictions they live under.

            (BTW, the

      • I don't understand what all the brouhaha is about. The best authority in this case are your children. If there is a way to lock someone out of Internet access they will stumble on it or figure it out. Ask for their help. You may lose your internet access, but at least your children will be safe.
    • Re:The best trick (Score:5, Interesting)

      by ImdatS ( 958642 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @08:10AM (#49104797) Homepage

      Apart from the tone of your message, I agree only partially on the content.

      I agree that the technology is not the solution.

      But supervision, as you say, is also not a complete solution.

      In my experience (father of a now adult daughter), the best was to explain, discuss and educate my daughter. When my daughter was around 6/7 years old, I slowly showed her to lookup stuff on the internet, where there are interesting things and als explained her about "dangerous" and "inappropriate" content there could be.

      But what was mot important was trust - i.e. I explained her that I trust her fully not to misuse the freedom I was giving her, when, at around age of 8, I allowed her to access the internet on her own. I explained her, later, about the dangers of posting inappropriate content on the internet e.g. on Facebook, or other social networks and what consequences it might have for her now or in the future.

      But I always made clear that the decision would be hers, that I would always be there for her if she found something discomforting or felt that she did something discomforting and that I would help her as much as I can. I made clear, though, that there certain things where even I can't help (full disclaimer, I have strong IT/Software/Internet background) - and that the best would be that should be careful.

      When she started using Social Networks, she then friended me (not me her) asking whether I could let her know if she posts something that could have negative effect on her or her future.

      This was the same approach with my nephew (he is 16 now) about 4 years ago and this is the same approach with my god-son: trust, education, and help - less so "control" or "supervision" - and the funny thing in the end was that all three of them asked for some supervision when they started using social networks, etc.

      Lastly: I showed all of them where they can find really interesting content that could be fun as well as where they can learn things - but this required to first understand what they really liked and were interested in (Daughter: Science, Knitting; Nephew: Singing, Police-Work; God-Son: Minecraft, Minecraft-Mods, Software-development, Games-Dev).

      Hope this helps from a father, uncle, godfather

      • First actually helpful post!

        As a parent of a 5 year old who currently has no unsupervised web access, I'm painfully aware that this will not last. He can currently access curated content from the internet in some games without my supervision. He will need web access in the not too distant future. Trust, showing them how to be safe, and how to find things that actually interest them, is clearly the way forward.

        (As an aside to those who think parenting equals full time supervision... I don't think any of

        • by ImdatS ( 958642 )

          As an added note: just to protect them (all three of them) from malicious code (read: virus, etc), I kindly asked that any time they want to install an app, they should please let me first check whether the app in question is "safe".

          They all either have/had laptops or desktops: so this was a no-brainer. Also, since they all use Macs, I can actually limit installations to "AppStore". So, normally, if they find something in the Apple AppStore (OS X), they ask me to check if it's ok or if there are any known i

      • Thanks, I was looking for people who actually went through it.
      • by HiThere ( 15173 )

        Sounds like the right advice for most kids. Doesn't sound like it would protect against scammers. ... Possibly a refillable credit card? That could let them learn with limited repercussions.

        OTOH, some children are "less able". I don't know how one can protect them. I have an autistic neice, and while I don't approve of the way she is being raised, I have to admit that I wouldn't know how to deal with the situation. (But Pavlov proved that the way being used is wrong. You don't positively reinforce tem

    • Yes little Johnny the only time you can use the computer is when I can sit down at the computer with you and watch every single thing you do. That's efficent and realistic isn't it. I take it you don't have kids - smh.
  • Not the right way (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jawtheshark ( 198669 ) * <slashdot@jawtheshaBLUErk.com minus berry> on Sunday February 22, 2015 @06:25AM (#49104551) Homepage Journal
    The right way is to talk to your kids about these things. Give examples of scams, tell them there is porn, there is violence, and always, always if they feel unsure about something they should talk to you (Mostly for scams, I'm pretty sure they'll handle porn. Hell, even weird porn isn't as bad as seeing ISIS chop someones head off). Software protection is just a crutch, the real protection is education and vigilance.The right way is to talk to your kids about these things. Give examples of scams, tell them there is porn, there is violence, and always, always if they feel unsure about something they should talk to you (Mostly for scams, I'm pretty sure they'll handle porn. Hell, even weird porn isn't as bad as seeing ISIS chop someones head off). Software protection is just a crutch, the real protection is education and vigilance.
    • Ah, yes, and "Preview"... Teach them to "Preview" posts too...
    • by cascadingstylesheet ( 140919 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @07:59AM (#49104767)

      Software protection is just a crutch, the real protection is education and vigilance.

      Hmm, well, I do both.

      Educate on the one hand, but on the other hand I'm also more devoted to maintaining a healthy home than I am to faux sophistication. Family computer right in the living room. Parental controls on the tablet. No smartphones for the kids.

      Ooh, oh no, how awful I am. Their lives will be so impoverished if they have to wait a few more years to experience worthless crap.

      • by tepples ( 727027 )

        Family computer right in the living room.

        Does it run Rockman? Or Akumajou Dracula?

        But seriously, good job on putting a PC in the living room. This means your family won't have to spend extra on a game console, as kids can just run HDMI from the PC to the TV when they want to play a game together.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Livius ( 318358 )

      If you think talking to children is sufficient, then you are a classic example of why it's not.

      That doesn't even work with most adults.

      • If you think talking to children is sufficient, then you are a classic example of why it's not.

        That doesn't even work with most adults.

        Yes, but at the same time a resounding no!

        Whether "talking to children/adults/whoever" works is dependent on a range of things:

        1) Are you approaching it from a positive mindset? If you talk to people expecting them to ignore what you say, you are far more likely to find them ignoring you.

        2) Are you "preaching", or trying to be informative? If the former, what you tell people will often be heard with a degree of skepticism and subsequently disregarded.

        3) Have you always taken the "talking" approach, or have

        • by jaseuk ( 217780 )

          Having the friends over is an opportunity. I walked in on a bunch of teenage boys using chat roulette for a "laugh". As a group it probably was harmless, had they done this alone they could possibly got in to real trouble. I told them that girl could easily be a 60 year old fat man, it could also be a really young girl, either way it could get you in trouble and not what you are looking for. They were genuinely repulsed and I'm pretty sure they got the idea..

          Do any of their friends use internet filtering

  • by Bert64 ( 520050 ) <bert@slashdot.fi ... m ['zee' in gap]> on Sunday February 22, 2015 @06:34AM (#49104573) Homepage

    If you're going to implement any kind of technical filtering it needs to be done at the network layer, and not on the physical machine that the kids have access to. If you do it on the physical machine then they will inevitably find a way around it, even as simple as booting a livecd.

    Ofcourse the key is education, this content is out there and kids will inevitably get access to it sooner or later. Whatever controls you implement on your own network or devices, the kids will either find a way to bypass them, or have access to an unfiltered network/device somewhere else. And if something is blocked, it becomes more interesting to the kids and they will actively seek out ways to get at the blocked content, whereas if it was unblocked the kids may not even have any interest in it...

    A good example is alcohol, when i was in school many of the other kids in my class were forbidden from touching alcohol and that made them seek out ways to obtain alcohol... Myself and a few others were never forbidden, our parents allowed us to try alcohol if we wanted... I found alcoholic drinks tasted quite disgusting, and lost interest in them.

    • The easiest solution that I've found for this at home is opendns using DNS port intercepting on a ddwrt router. Simple instructions for making this happen are at http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/ind... [dd-wrt.com]. If you give your kid a cell phone with a data plan this will be quickly side stepped, but if you take a pass on giving your preteen a phone until they are old enough to grasp some of the needed conversations, it does give some measure of reliable and configurable protection to your local network.
    • Do what I did: set up filtering at the gateway and give plenty of time to both discussion and management.

      I used a transparent squid proxy with access control lists appropriate for the kid and intercepted and redirected DNS queries. (With more than one kid, I needed multiple acls, ymmv.)

      Initially I limited internet access to specific times and a whitelist and discussed what they were doing daily. Over time and with age and maturity, I relaxed the acl to just record what was being accessed and just reviewed

      • I used a transparent squid proxy with access control lists appropriate for the kid and intercepted and redirected DNS queries. (With more than one kid, I needed multiple acls, ymmv.) Initially I limited internet access to specific times and a whitelist and discussed what they were doing daily. Over time and with age and maturity, I relaxed the acl to just record what was being accessed and just reviewed their browsing with them when they made questionable choices.

        Pretty much what I did. Block the kids' MAC

    • >

      A good example is alcohol, when i was in school many of the other kids in my class were forbidden from touching alcohol and that made them seek out ways to obtain alcohol... Myself and a few others were never forbidden, our parents allowed us to try alcohol if we wanted... I found alcoholic drinks tasted quite disgusting, and lost interest in them.

      I liked the taste and (ultimately) became a brewer.

      • Good point and I am otherwise inclined to agree with you except for one thing: kid's tastebuds and their general sense of taste is nothing like ours. By the time you are an adult, a good percentage of of the sense of taste you had when you were growing up is already lost. This is why infants do best on extremely bland blended peas and such. The GP makes a strong argument from experience.

        Speaking for myself, my mother smoked until I was 7 years of age. When I was about 5, I distinctly remember pestering her

    • My parents could have blocked porn all day long and it wouldn't have affected my interest in the slightest. Naked girls doing naughty things? Yes please.

      IMO by the time kids are old enough to care they are old enough to jerk off. Please get rid of the belt-buckle hats and let Puritans live on only on our cereal boxes.

    • by antdude ( 79039 )

      I also hate alcohol too when my parents let me tried wines, beers, etc. Same with friends. I will take water and juice!

  • Not going to work (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Opportunist ( 166417 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @06:44AM (#49104593)

    By definition. And if you think about it, you'll notice why.

    The "enemies" in this battle is you vs. your child. Your goal: To keep your kid from seeing stuff it's not supposed to see. Your kid's goal: To do whatever it wants and to ignore that rule you imposed.

    You have finite means and finite time at your hands to implement something supposed to be blocking your child. Your child has WAY more amount of time at his or her hands (think about when they come home from school vs. when you come from work). They also have a pool of peers to draw information from, and in this pool the ability to bypass parental control is quite a bit of a status symbol, while you relying on your peers is probably not that useful since asking for help because your kids outsmart you is much but certainly NOT a status symbol.

    If everything else fails, if you are really the ultimate computer guru who can lock down your kids' computers and smartphones, all they have to do is spend the day with li'l Timmy from across the street whose parents don't know jack about computers, and who can't keep Timmy (and in turn your kids) from seeing whatever they please. Which is, again, something Timmy will certainly and gladly agree to, since as stated above, outsmarting your parents and ignoring their rules is a status symbol.

    In other words, the deck is stacked against you. The sensibly move is not to play.

    • Yes, I guess it's much of a lost battle. But as a parent you feel guilty if you don't try. It's like when they go walking down the street alone, you know it's alright, but you know there are a couple of dangerous crossroads and try to be sure to address those at least.
  • Dansguardian works well on the network level and is easy to set up and configure the degree of filtering.
    • I came here to mention exactly this. Getting the initial blocklist was somewhat of a challenge, the connection kept timing out.

      My purpose was not for children so much as restricting the free wifi I provided to guests and neighbors. To "encourage" the use of the dansguardian proxy I used a wireless router that did not have a connection to the internet, and the dansguardian box was a client on both that network and the real network. Worked well enough.

  • by dbIII ( 701233 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @07:09AM (#49104655)
    The other things are little more than placebos. If the kid can get to a search engine it's not going to slow them down much. A solution advocated for years has been to put the computer in a public space until you no longer care what the child looks at.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 22, 2015 @07:11AM (#49104663)

    I'd just like to take this opportunity to thank my father, and my friends' dads who left their porno stashes in obvious places and didn't ever bitch about it unless we took too many and didn't bring them back.

    Thanks to all the cool dads out there who realized that even though we weren't 3rd world children, we should get to checkout some nudity as part of our natural adolescence -- I mean, why else would we have the interest to do so?

    Also, thanks to the local BBSs which had far shittier porn, but digitized versions of The Anarchist's Cook Book, Steal This Book, and Phreaking / Hacking guides, the latter of which my parents surely would not have approved of, but without which I wouldn't have a leg-up in the lucrative career I occupy today.

    In short: Fuck off parents. 3rd world kids help do the work of carrying water, collecting firewood, and butchering animals for meals at young ages while seeing nudity constantly -- Why would you want your kids to have LESS knowledge about life and less skills than children of 3rd world nations? Admit it: You don't know what's good for your kids. It's a damn good think you can't keep them from seeing anything they want online.

    • Would these be some of the same Third World kids who learn that condoms cause AIDS, that sex with a virgin cures it, and that they're morally bound to kill their sister if they suspect that she's not a virgin?

  • The Internet will detect any parental control as a damage and route around it.
    • I think its beneficial to set up parental controls, as bypassing it serves as a useful learning experience.
  • Does not work (Score:5, Insightful)

    by gweihir ( 88907 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @07:18AM (#49104689)

    The "solutions" on other platforms do not work, unless your children are really stupid. The only thing they do is make forbidden things a bit more interesting. One reason such systems do AFAIK not exist on Linux is that the futility of their use is rather obvious and the scam of getting money from parents for this is not attempted there.

    On the other side, the dangers to kids on the Internet are vastly overblown. For example, there still is not one shred of evidence that porn is actually dangerous to children. The only reason children are "protected" from it (which does not work and has never worked) is that various religions want this. The risk of "scammers" and "cyberbullies" are easily mitigated by explaining to children how these things work. Of course a few will still fall for it, but scammers are no real risk as children have limited funds, and everybody needs to learn how to deal with bullies anyways. And what you put under "worse" is basically your imagination running wildly, not any actual problems. Just make sure your children trust you and come to you for advice if they have a problem. Using such tools may have a negative effect there, as mistrust breeds mistrust.

    • The risk of "scammers" and "cyberbullies" are easily mitigated by explaining to children how these things work. Of course a few will still fall for it, but scammers are no real risk as children have limited funds, and everybody needs to learn how to deal with bullies anyways.

      Yeah, 'cause no adults ever fall for internet scams. Ever.

      I mean, good grief -- we can't expect adults to avoid scammers, so you think simple education is going to be effective for kids with much less real-world experience?

      And as for "bullies," well this is part of a larger concern that impersonal interactions on the internet can easily become very personal, particularly to impressionable young people. This isn't just bullying -- it's things like sexual predators "grooming" kids and convincing them to

      • by gweihir ( 88907 )

        You seem to have a personality disorder form the delusional and paranoid spectrum. Better get help before you ruin other people's (like your children's) lives. Nothing what you said is reasonable in the real world.

    • As a personal experience, early exposure to porn can distort your approach to sex when it's time. And something deep inside still tells me that a 10yo child should not watch porn.
    • Porn isn't a problem in general, but a fair amount of porn is problematic, the "rapeyness" of some porn is normalising non-consensual sexual pratices amongst teenagers to a certain extent. It's probably a good idea to surreptitiously promote "responsible" porn to divert their attention away from the completely unfiltered mix of what's out there, but the methods for doing this aren't obvious.
      • by gweihir ( 88907 )

        There are actually no "methods for doing this". The only thing you can do is explain to them that porn is not real. Anybody halfway smart does discover that on their first actual sexual contact anyways. In addition, I do not buy it. There are now very strong indicators that neither violence on TV nor in games cause people to be more violent. I see zero reason that this should change when sex is put into the mix. I rather thing that this is again prohibitionist propaganda, that cannot hold water when examine

  • ...in Tehran or Pyongyang.

    I mean it's the only way to guarantee your kids won't be accessing undesirable material, right?

  • You can set up a transparent proxy like squid (http://www.squid-cache.org/) combined with iptables (http://iptables.org/), so that any outbound port 80 or port 443 requests from the machine can get filtered via squid.

    Then, in squid you can run all your logic through DansGuardian (http://dansguardian.org/?page=whatisdg), a content filter.

  • Avoiding Frustation (Score:4, Informative)

    by shigutso ( 2932389 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @08:34AM (#49104869)
    You can go simple and just avoid frustration by using OpenDNS:
    https://www.opendns.com/home-i... [opendns.com]

    They have a feature to block inappropriate websites, and I think you cannot change the DNS unless you have the sudo/root password.

    Also, Adblock Plus blocks malware and social media (if your kids are too young to use Facebook).

    Finally, YouTube has an option to block sensitive media, under account options.

    Good luck!
  • If they're old enough to surf on their own, they're old enough to handle it on their own.

    It is - to a degree - your call if they are old enough to do so, but countermeasures to keep the "bad internet" away from your children, if you are geek enough to allow them access, is a bit of an oxymoron.

    Hint: If they want to see porn and/or Isis set someone on fire, they will do so. If not at home then at/with their friends. Trying to prevent this is being silly. Once I trusted my daughter to handle her own Ubuntu Netbook I also trusted her to handle the web. ... I did curb her webtime though, it can get out of hand. ... But she uses the web and her smartphone as an extension for her social life, not as a substitute. She's actually more on the go than I am, and unwinds not surfing but streaming american teenie serials to improve her english (currenty the 100 [imdb.com] is hip). Not the worst thing to do, imho. Her homework gets done and she's due for her a-levels, so who am I to complain?

    I had a discussion a few years back with a mom of one of her very close friends. She too was worried that the new laptop would enable them to watch porn and get a false impression about sexuality. I basically said the same thing that I wrote above and bit my lip about her habit of changing boyfriends every odd month - something way more likely of determining her daughters POV on relationships and sexuality.

    Ask them to learn something productive with them - my daughter eventually decided to do a little image editing and I got her a neat colorful book on Gimp [amazon.de] of which she duefully did some excersises and learned a little about files, photography and image manipulation. Good thing for a teenage girl exposed to a cosmetics/fashion industry in constant overdrive. She didn't want to learn programming though. ... I'll survive that I guess.

    Tell them about Facebook, Whatsapp, data mining, automated 24/7 surveilance, scams, rapists, shady friends, online mobbing (both sides of it!), etc.. Give them fake accounts and tell them to never use their real name and adress and to be suspicious of the web in general - including mainstream news.

    Bottom line:
    Be a good father, take care of your kids and make a reasonable judgement as to when they're ready to have their own computer.
    Do the basics to keep them out of harms way (hint: porn is way, way down on that list) and make sure they've understood what you're talking about and have no fear of coming to you whenever they're insecure about something internet related. Let the rest take its course. ... That's parenting 101 for you.

    My 2 cents.

  • by MadCow42 ( 243108 ) on Sunday February 22, 2015 @09:27AM (#49105061) Homepage

    Supervision and education aside,

    Try "Untangle" on a firewall box between them and the internet. Then it doesn't matter what OS they're using, or if they're using an iPad, iPod, or other device to access the internet either.

    Untangle is free (at least the lite version, which is actually more than enough for home use), and will run on an old or cheap box. I have mine running on a book-sized PC I built for under $200, including an SSD HD. It's a Linux-based firewall/NAT/more.

    It'll filter ads (common malware sources), malware, phishing attacks, intrusions, website filtering (whitelist or blacklist) by content type, block certain protocols (TOR, etc.). Basically, you can lock it down tight. My kids are still too young to intentionally get into much trouble yet, but it protects them from the inadvertent trouble. But - it was enough to totally frustrate my teenage nephews over Christmas - and the logs show they weren't able to get around it (which was a good test!).

    www.untangle.com

    Check it out.

    • Thanks, I was looking for people who actually went through it. My kids are also too young currently, but I'd like to be prepared.
  • It's called a whitelisting firewall.
  • I'd rather just discuss these things with my kids. Way easier to give them the tools to make the right decisions on their own than to hide my kids under a rock, deep in a cave.

    • Small note: due to Google's policy of showing different people different search results, your first hit might not be their first hit.
  • My two daughters both had their own computers by the time they were about 10 or 12. They had them in their bedrooms. Other parents we talked to were completely freaked out. "Oh my God, we would never let Tiffany have a computer in her bedroom." Does Tiffany have a smartphone? Well of course. Where does she keep it? In her bedroom. WTF?? It just didn't occur to them that all the reasons they had for not letting their kids have a computer in their bedrooms were equally applicable to smartphones.

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